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Article

Mary W Ghikas

Document delivery is a rapidly growing area of interest, yet public policy issues have not been clearly defined and discussed. For that reason, it is essential to begin by…

Abstract

Document delivery is a rapidly growing area of interest, yet public policy issues have not been clearly defined and discussed. For that reason, it is essential to begin by defining what we mean by ‘public’ and ‘private’ sector and by the term ‘document delivery’. Public policy issues can then be identified in four areas: (1) marketplace competition, (2) intellectual property, (3) fair use of public resources, and (4) public good. Because past perception of the issues has been vague, the volume of activity and the economic stakes relatively low, it is still possible for public/private sector roles to be defined in a non‐combative atmosphere, to mutually‐beneficial ends.

Details

Interlending & Document Supply, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-1615

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Article

Veronica Johansson

Government practices concerning self‐administered, direct Internet publishing of material are burgeoning. In this situation, local public libraries can balance…

Abstract

Government practices concerning self‐administered, direct Internet publishing of material are burgeoning. In this situation, local public libraries can balance democratically unfavourable consequences of new ICT practices in early e‐government initiatives, an important task, especially considering that the intermediary and disseminating functions of traditional mass media are being questioned. Using Habermas’s theories on public spheres and mass media, the concept of intermediary in today’s society is discussed in the context of international information policy documents and public library manifestos. Against this background, two Swedish cases concerning work within a municipal library and regional politics are presented. In conclusion, it is suggested that public libraries have both the obligation and the possibility to counteract tendencies toward shallow representation of public administration, fragmentation of societies and documents, and dislocations of responsibilities from government agencies to libraries. If handled properly, library practices that add value might even strengthen and rejuvenate the democratic system.

Details

New Library World, vol. 105 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Book part

Lilia Pavlovsky

It has been suggested that “space and artifacts constitute systems of communication which organizations build up within themselves” (Gagliardi, 1992a, b, p. vi) and…

Abstract

It has been suggested that “space and artifacts constitute systems of communication which organizations build up within themselves” (Gagliardi, 1992a, b, p. vi) and reflect the cultural life within that organization. This is a study of how the “landscape” of a public library (“Library X”), as an information retrieval system, relates to the values of the people who created it. The efforts here are geared towards understanding the physical instantiation of institutional culture and, more specifically, institutional values as they are reflected through the artifact.

Details

Advances in Library Administration and Organization
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-338-9

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Article

Ralf Klischewski

This research seeks to explore the potential of ontologies for reorganizing e‐document management in public administration with the aim of supporting administration in…

Abstract

Purpose

This research seeks to explore the potential of ontologies for reorganizing e‐document management in public administration with the aim of supporting administration in organizing cross‐organizational document and information management.

Design/methodology/approach

Since ontologies are suitable for organizing metadata for annotation of informational resources, the research question is: How can public administrations make use of ontologies for organizing and improving their e‐document management? Findings, based on an action research project in the state administration of Schleswig‐Holstein (Germany).

Findings

The research findings indicate that structuring documents and information through ontologies requires a socio‐technical infrastructure consisting of a number of regularities, services and support on the level of organization as well as information technology.

Research limitations/implications

Since the case of Schleswig‐Holstein is typical for governments trying to enter the information age without having the power and resources to be on the leading edge, the recommendations based on this research may support the strategy development and solution finding in other administrations as well.

Practical implications

A rather small government (such as that of Schleswig‐Holstein) must be aware of its strategic goals and step ahead carefully in order to avoid the risks of misinvestment while reorganizing its e‐document management.

Originality/value

The paper systematically addresses the question “How can public administration make use of ontologies for organizing and improving their e‐document management?”.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

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Article

Basma Makhlouf Shabou

This paper aims to present a recent study on the definition and measurement of quality dimensions of public electronic records and archives (QADEPs: Qualités des archives…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present a recent study on the definition and measurement of quality dimensions of public electronic records and archives (QADEPs: Qualités des archives et documents électroniques publics). It develops an original model and a complete method with tools to define and measure electronic public data qualities within public institutions. It highlights also the relationship between diplomatics principles and the measurement of trustworthiness of electronic data in particular. This paper presents a general overview of the main results of this study, with also illustrative examples to demonstrate the feasibility of measuring the qualities of electronic archives in the context of public institutions.

Design/methodology/approach

This research was conducted in two phases. The first one was the conceptual phase in which the quality dimensions were identified and defined with specific sets of indicators and variables. The second phase was the empirical phase which involved the testing of the model on real electronic documents belonging to several public institutions to validate its relevance and applicability. These tests were performed at the Archives of the State of Wallis and the Archives of the State of Geneva, thanks to different measurement tools designed especially for this stage of the research.

Findings

The QADEPs model analyzes the qualities of electronic records in public institutions through three dimensions: trustworthiness, exploitability and representativeness. These dimensions were divided into eight sub-dimensions comprising 17 indicators for a total of 46 variables. These dimensions and their variables tried to cover the main aspects of quality standards for electronic data and public documents. The study demonstrates that nearly 60 per cent of the measured variables could be automated.

Research limitations/implications

The QADEPs model was defined and tested in a Swiss context on a limited sample of electronic public data to validate, essentially, its feasibility. It would be useful to extend this approach and test it on a broader sample in different contexts abroad.

Practical implications

The decisionmaking of records retention in organizations and public institutions in particular is difficult to establish and justify because it is based generally on subjective and non-defendable practices. The QADEPs model offers specific metrics with their related measuring tools to evaluate and identify what is valuable and what is eliminable within the whole set of institutional electronic information. The model should reinforce the information governance of those institutions and help them control the risks related to information management.

Originality/value

The current practice of archival appraisal does not yet invest in a meticulous examination of the nature of documents that should be preserved permanently. The lack of studies on the definition and measurement of the qualities of electronic and public electronic records prevents verification as to whether archival materials are significant. This paper fills in some of the gaps.

Details

Records Management Journal, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-5698

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Article

Katleen Janssen

This paper aims to address the recent trends and developments relating to the re‐use of public sector information (PSI) and open government data.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to address the recent trends and developments relating to the re‐use of public sector information (PSI) and open government data.

Design/methodology/approach

It starts from the European Commission's Digital Agenda, which stressed the importance of opening up access to content to promote the single market. While the 2003 PSI directive has contributed to this, barriers to the re‐use of PSI still remain, often based on a lack of awareness with public sector data holders and users. Some of these barriers are currently being challenged by the open government data (OGD) movement. While this movement has comparable objectives to the PSI directive, it is based on different arguments. This raises the question of how the two approaches relate.

Findings

The paper argues that the proponents of the re‐use of PSI and OGD should join forces to promote the availability of public sector data.

Originality/value

In this way, the public sector can be encouraged to rethink its information policy and move to a more coherent view on how data can be used to increase the benefits for the information society and the market for digital content.

Details

info, vol. 13 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6697

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Book part

Paul A. Pautler

The Bureau of Economics in the Federal Trade Commission has a three-part role in the Agency and the strength of its functions changed over time depending on the…

Abstract

The Bureau of Economics in the Federal Trade Commission has a three-part role in the Agency and the strength of its functions changed over time depending on the preferences and ideology of the FTC’s leaders, developments in the field of economics, and the tenor of the times. The over-riding current role is to provide well considered, unbiased economic advice regarding antitrust and consumer protection law enforcement cases to the legal staff and the Commission. The second role, which long ago was primary, is to provide reports on investigations of various industries to the public and public officials. This role was more recently called research or “policy R&D”. A third role is to advocate for competition and markets both domestically and internationally. As a practical matter, the provision of economic advice to the FTC and to the legal staff has required that the economists wear “two hats,” helping the legal staff investigate cases and provide evidence to support law enforcement cases while also providing advice to the legal bureaus and to the Commission on which cases to pursue (thus providing “a second set of eyes” to evaluate cases). There is sometimes a tension in those functions because building a case is not the same as evaluating a case. Economists and the Bureau of Economics have provided such services to the FTC for over 100 years proving that a sub-organization can survive while playing roles that sometimes conflict. Such a life is not, however, always easy or fun.

Details

Healthcare Antitrust, Settlements, and the Federal Trade Commission
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-599-9

Keywords

Content available
Article

Tomi Rajala and Petra Kokko

This study examines unexplored horizontal accountability types between public, private and third sector actors within a hybrid organization. The case organization was…

Abstract

Purpose

This study examines unexplored horizontal accountability types between public, private and third sector actors within a hybrid organization. The case organization was applying a novel alliance model to generate service paths for heterogeneous clientele consuming cultural, educational, health and social services. It was first to do so in Finland.

Design/methodology/approach

This research is on a case study that used documents and interviews to examine the design of the horizontal accountability. The descriptive analysis focused on identifying what type of formal accountability system was designed (i.e. who is the account holder, and who is accountable and for what and why).

Findings

An imbalanced accountability system was identified because accountability obligations were unevenly distributed between public, private and third sector actors. The private sector was the most accountable for performance, and the third sector (i.e. voluntary sector) was the least accountable. As account holders, the public, private and third sector actors were judging their conduct as account providers. This created a biased horizontal accountability system. The hybrid's accountability system was dynamic because the contracts made to establish the hybrid included opportunities to change horizontal accountability if future changes to the external environment affect too drastically the potential to achieve the hybrid's goals.

Originality/value

Three new concepts are proposed for studying dysfunctional accountability systems: dynamic, biased and horizontally imbalanced accountability.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

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Book part

Carmela Barbera, Elio Borgonovi and Ileana Steccolini

The purpose of this contribution is to investigate whether popular reports can strengthen public governance by fostering greater transparency and public participation.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this contribution is to investigate whether popular reports can strengthen public governance by fostering greater transparency and public participation.

Methodology/approach

The analysis is based on the case of the “Bilancio in Arancio” of the Municipality of Milan. Data are collected through a triangulation of sources, including the authors’ direct observation, conversational interviews, the press, and a questionnaire distributed to the citizens participating in the experience.

Findings

The analysis discusses how popular reports can improve Public Governance, and identify related critical issues. More specifically, four key aspects of Popular reporting appear to play a central role in strengthening governance, that is, their capacity to ensure greater transparency, neutrality, enhanced participation and impacts on decision making. We suggest that every aspect represents an important “step” to be taken in an ideal “ladder of participation.”

Practical implications

Governments that want to enhance public governance may have an interest in developing popular reports, paying attention at ensuring transparency, neutrality, stakeholders’ participation, and their contribution to decision-making processes.

Social implications

Popular reports can provide to citizens the education on public budgeting issues required to consciously participate in public decision-making processes and give them greater voice and power to express their instances. Popular reports can also promote a two-way communication and dialogue between citizens and governments.

Originality/value

Drawing on the experience of the Municipality of Milan, more general lessons are learnt on the role of popular reports in strengthening public governance, and on the related strengths and weaknesses.

Details

Governance and Performance in Public and Non-Profit Organizations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-107-4

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Article

Lenka Pokorná, Michal Indrák, Maroš Grman, Frantisek Stepanovsky and Martina Smetánková

The paper aims to describe a digital library (DL) model that attempts to replace traditional library services during the lockdown caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, set in…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to describe a digital library (DL) model that attempts to replace traditional library services during the lockdown caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, set in the context of current copyright laws. A server instance protected by shibboleth authentication enabled students and academic staff access remotely even copyright-protected works for the period of the lockdown. Through brief observation of user behaviour in this server instance, the paper explores accessed titles, especially with focus on their copyright status.

Design/methodology/approach

Library usage was observed in a branch of a DL, which enabled remote access to copyright-protected documents. Data were obtained from Google Analytics and access logs enriched with metadata.

Findings

Academic DL users overwhelmingly preferred titles that are copyright protected, monographs in particular. Their spectrum of interests was wide, and thus, mass digitisation is essential.

Originality/value

The paper presents a solution to provide free remote access to library users during closure on a national level. The case study reveals the needs and interests of DL users via a brief analysis of accessed titles and gives grounds for further changes towards a more open remote access DL model, which would be possible within the current copyright restrictions.

Details

Digital Library Perspectives, vol. 36 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5816

Keywords

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