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Book part
Publication date: 6 December 2017

Roberto Moro Visconti, Anna Doś and Asli Pelin Gurgun

The aim of the chapter is to compare Public–Private Partnership (PPP) healthcare investments in developed countries with those in emerging economies, analysing the…

Abstract

The aim of the chapter is to compare Public–Private Partnership (PPP) healthcare investments in developed countries with those in emerging economies, analysing the sustainability issues of health-led growth. Healthcare PPP best practices in developed nations represent a template that catching-up economies may follow with local adaptations. A comparison starts from the UK case and then examines the Turkish experience as an ideal bridge between advanced and developing countries. Healthcare investments are a primary social infrastructure, with a deep impact on poverty alleviation. Demand for the infrastructure necessary to provide healthcare services has increased substantially in developing and emerging economies due to rapid economic growth, industrialization and urbanization, while public supply is limited by budget constraints. PPP best practices provide a global benchmark (World bank, 2015b). Integrated supply and value chains and management of viability milestone improve healthcare PPP sustainability and bankability. Different legal frameworks and funding issues are not thoroughly investigated. Careful customization and local fine-tuning of best practices require further scrutiny. Homogenization of best practices improves comparison of different projects, fostering competition and easing cross-border investments, accompanied by knowledge transfer, sharing and consequent value co-creation. Best practices improve value for money, bankability and resilience of PPP investments, with potential benefits for healthcare services and quality of life. This chapter makes an innovative and comprehensive comparison of healthcare PPP projects worldwide, looking for a common denominator of value-enhancing rules and resilient pro-growth strategies.

Details

The Emerald Handbook of Public–Private Partnerships in Developing and Emerging Economies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-494-1

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2009

Abstract

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International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Abstract

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International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 25 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Article
Publication date: 3 May 2011

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International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Article
Publication date: 20 January 2021

Marios Adamou, Niki Kyriakidou and Jon Connolly

Since the 1990s, the National Health Service (NHS)advisory officers have developed considerable expertise in managing the process of specifying, procuring, contracting and…

Abstract

Purpose

Since the 1990s, the National Health Service (NHS)advisory officers have developed considerable expertise in managing the process of specifying, procuring, contracting and running public–private partnership (PPP) projects. However, there has been a relatively consistent trajectory in the findings of studies and evaluation of PPP from its initial introduction in the health sector in 1992 to the present time. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to critically evaluate the PPP experience in the UK context using a case study in the NHS.

Design/methodology/approach

The partnership literature is primarily focussed on process issues, and the impact of partnerships on improving outcomes cannot be assumed. By conducting a critical review on most updated research studies and innovative approaches in this area, the literature as to the place of PPPs in health in the context of the UK is critically explored and whether they have a role in system resilience is examined. A case study has be used as well to describing the processes of a PPP arrangement.

Findings

Health-care PPP is one of the options relating to health system resilience. However, their contribution in the NHS has been mixed, with success noted in short-term clinical and services contracts while in the long-term the value for money argument has not been proven. In theory, the role of PPPs in bringing together ingredients supporting system resilience such as finance, management and innovation in the UK has not always been successful, and NHS providers have taken the approach to exit such arrangements.

Research limitations/implications

More research work is needed to capture the 21st-century challenges and critical success factors during its implementation.

Practical implications

The creation of strong partnerships is moving service delivery away from a project-by-project approach to one that includes strategic and policy developments for long-term results.

Originality/value

This is a fresh discussion in the role of PPP in system resilience in the UK perspective through a case study describing an exit from a PPP arrangement.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

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Article
Publication date: 6 April 2010

Muhiuddin Haider and Avinandan Mukherjee

Neonatal healthcare is a critical issue in public health management. The purpose of this paper is to analyze neonatal health in South Asia. This paper specifically…

Abstract

Purpose

Neonatal healthcare is a critical issue in public health management. The purpose of this paper is to analyze neonatal health in South Asia. This paper specifically examines the neonatal period of an infant's development, the time from birth to the first 28 days, and the importance of providing each newborn with the necessary vaccines, treatments, and care they may require. In addition to examining neonatal health and those diseases/problems that afflict children without proper care, a closer look will be taken at Southern Asia, where research shows nearly 75 percent of the neonatal deaths that take place in the world, occur.

Design/methodology/approach

An extensive literature review using recently published works, government documents, and organizational reports is employed. The research is based on case studies of six South Asian countries and several international participating agencies and non‐governmental organizations working on the improvement of neonatal health.

Findings

The research shows that the majority of the countries in this region lack the funds necessary to provide aide, health services, and other preventative care to their populations. Without the global attention, intervention, and resources provided by these organizations, any progress made in the area of neonatal health in these regions will continue to be hampered. A social marketing framework designed to address this critical public health challenge is presented.

Originality/value

In the modern world, much advancement has been made in terms of neonatal and maternal health and well‐being. As the years have passed, the world has seen many improvements on clinical procedures, health policies and regulations, the quality of training for doctors, nurses, and related specialists, and the various pieces of medical equipment used throughout those hospitals and clinics located within the developing world. Unfortunately, data provided by various research efforts have shown that neonatal mortality continues to occur at high rates throughout countries in South Asia. Individuals in these countries lack access to health care, health education, and other essential components that influence a mother's ability to produce a healthy child and keep that child safe and illness/issue free throughout this fragile period.

Details

International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6123

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Book part
Publication date: 29 January 2018

Jari Vuori, Marika Kylänen and Santtu Mikkonen

The chapter aims to compare public, private and non-profit working citizens’ preferences for cross-sectoral relations in England and Finland. Its main contribution is in…

Abstract

The chapter aims to compare public, private and non-profit working citizens’ preferences for cross-sectoral relations in England and Finland. Its main contribution is in identifying preferences in the delivery of services in the respective countries in which citizen choice has become an issue in times of public sector austerity. Challenges arise because in these two similarly institutionalized healthcare systems but pluralistic societies people have contrasting perspectives on the values that should guide policy decisions. The survey data was therefore collected in both England (N = 2,000) and Finland (N = 1,973) in 2013 from cities in which citizens have choices regarding health service delivery. Our informants in England anticipated more potential for better ‘privatized driven public interest’ than did those in Finland. Surprisingly, over 60% of public sector employees in England would like for-profit healthcare to carry main responsibility, and almost 55% of all employees agree with this. Almost 20% of respondents in both countries did not care who the service provider is if only services are available. Thus, the research has pioneering relevance for policymaking, public strategic management and the comparative empirical study of managing people’s preferences in cross-sectoral relations. We conclude that identifying working citizens’ preferences is crucial for effective utilization of current welfare services because the preferences derive from both service and work experience. In sum, strategically, this identification lets public managers balance biased images of the cross-sectoral differences and reconstruct functional hybridity of services.

Details

Cross-Sectoral Relations in the Delivery of Public Services
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-172-0

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Article
Publication date: 16 February 2010

Kathie Thomas and Mary Wolf

Partnerships between public health organizations and private corporations may be best positioned to address many of the major healthcare challenges currently facing…

Abstract

Partnerships between public health organizations and private corporations may be best positioned to address many of the major healthcare challenges currently facing nations across the globe. Strategically chosen partners can collaborate and share resources to develop and successfully implement valuable solutions to achieve common goals. The key is using innovation methods to effectively leverage the best resources provided by each partner. The authors explain the value of public-private partnerships while also providing insight into how specific tactics from projects undertaken by their international communications firm, Fleishman-Hillard, assisted partnerships in their efforts to develop innovative solutions to address healthcare challenges.

Details

International Journal of Innovation Science, vol. 1 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-2223

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Article
Publication date: 5 September 2016

Hariati Abdullah Hashim, Maimunah Sapri and Sheau-Ting Low

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the challenges associated with the delivery of facilities management (FM) under public–private partnership (PPP) for healthcare

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the challenges associated with the delivery of facilities management (FM) under public–private partnership (PPP) for healthcare services in Malaysia.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire survey has been administrated to PPP practitioners in Malaysia. The study has adopted reliability and descriptive method for analysis.

Findings

This research resulted in a series of 14 challenges that have to be faced in the implementation of PPP FM for healthcare services in Malaysia. Inadequate specific PPP risk management model is identified as the most significant challenge followed by the difficulty in reaching agreements and project complexity.

Originality/value

This study is considered the first study that identifies and assesses the challenges of PPP within the Malaysian context. The findings will provide a more informed basis for decision-making process, especially for the FM bidders.

Details

Journal of Facilities Management, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-5967

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Article
Publication date: 5 July 2013

Robert Eadie, Phillip Millar and Rory Grant

Public private partnerships (PPP) and the private finance initiative (PFI) are defined as a range of practical long‐standing relationships between the public and private…

Abstract

Purpose

Public private partnerships (PPP) and the private finance initiative (PFI) are defined as a range of practical long‐standing relationships between the public and private sectors. This paper aims to investigate managers’ perceptions of PPP/PFI in two of the three largest sectors for private sector capital‐spend in PPP/PFI schemes, namely transport (highway infrastructure) and healthcare.

Design/methodology/approach

A web‐based Limesurvey™ questionnaire was used to collect data. A sample of 75 organisations was identified from the Partnerships UK (PUK) online Project Database (Partnerships UK, 2010). Total of 49 responses were received, of which 39 were complete.

Findings

Results from each sector relating to PPP/PFI “best value”, advantages and disadvantages, and government preferred procurement routes, are investigated. The majority of organisations did not consider that PPP/PFI provided “best value” but thought it provided more value than the other two UK Government preferred procurement routes, “design and build” and “prime contracting”.

Practical implications

This questions the UK Government's choice of preferred procurement routes. However, even during a recession and its aftermath, the majority of respondents consider that PPP/PFI remains appropriate to healthcare and transport developments.

Originality/value

Firstly, this paper carries out a ranking of common advantages and disadvantages to PFI/PPP followed by an investigation of “best value” as perceived by contractors and consultants subsequent to the construction phase. Then the three preferred UK Government procurement routes are contrasted in terms of “best value” and finally the paper investigates how PPP/PFI schemes are viewed during recessionary times.

Details

Built Environment Project and Asset Management, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-124X

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