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Article
Publication date: 13 May 2020

Amy Elizabeth Fulton, Julie Drolet, Nasreen Lalani and Erin Smith

This article explores the community recovery and resilience element of “building back better” (BBB) through the perspectives and experiences of community influencers who…

Abstract

Purpose

This article explores the community recovery and resilience element of “building back better” (BBB) through the perspectives and experiences of community influencers who provided psychosocial supports after the 2013 floods in southern Alberta, Canada.

Design/methodology/approach

The Alberta Resilient Communities (ARC) project adopted a community-based research methodology to examine the lived realities of children, youth, families and their communities postflood. In-depth semistructured interviews were conducted with 37 community influencer participants representing a range of organizations including not-for-profit agencies, community organizations, social service agencies and government departments.

Findings

The findings were drawn from the interviews held with community influencers in flood-affected communities. Major themes include disaster response challenges, insufficient funding for long-term disaster recovery, community partnerships and collaborations and building and strengthening social capital.

Practical implications

Findings demonstrate the need to build better psychosocial services, supports and resources in the long term to support community recovery and resilience postdisaster for children, youth and families to “build back better” on a psychosocial level.

Social implications

Local social service agencies play a key role in the capacity of children, youth and families to “build back better” postdisaster. These organizations need to be resourced and prepared to respond to psychosocial needs in the long term in order to successfully contribute to postdisaster recovery.

Originality/value

The findings illustrate that adopting a psychosocial framework for disaster recovery can better inform social service disaster response and long-term recovery plans consistent with the BBB framework. Implications for social service agencies and policymakers interested in fostering postdisaster community recovery and resilience, particularly with children and youth, are presented.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 February 2018

Chao-Chih Hung, Tzung-Cheng Huan, Chun-Han Lee, Hsin-Mei Lin and Wen-Long Zhuang

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship of regulatory foci (promotion focus and prevention focus) to expatriate adjustments (general, interaction, and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship of regulatory foci (promotion focus and prevention focus) to expatriate adjustments (general, interaction, and work adjustments) and explore whether mentoring functions (psychosocial support, role modeling, and career development) moderate the aforementioned relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

Using 141 questionnaired primary data (response rate 32.25 percent) gathered from at least six months experienced expatiates of multinational companies in six industries, this study adopts regression method to examine the moderating effect.

Findings

This study found that promotion focus was positively related to the interaction and work adjustment, respectively; prevention focus was positively related to the general, interaction, and work adjustment, respectively. Psychosocial support function moderates the relationship between promotion focus and general adjustment. Career development function moderates the relationships between promotion/prevention foci and work adjustment.

Originality/value

According to the interactionism perspective, behavior is a result of the interaction between personality and situational influences, has a long history in social and personality psychology. This study extends this perspective to the interactive effects of mentorship (situational factor) and expatriates’ regulatory foci (personality factor) on expatriate adjustment.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 40 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 November 2010

Wendy Marcinkus Murphy and Kathy E. Kram

The purpose of this study is to explore the different contributions of work and non‐work relationships that comprise individuals' developmental networks to career success.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore the different contributions of work and non‐work relationships that comprise individuals' developmental networks to career success.

Design/methodology/approach

A multi‐method approach provides a rich understanding of how work and non‐work developmental relationships combine to support individuals' careers. Survey data were analyzed from 254 working adults who were also part‐time MBA students. Semi‐structured interviews were conducted with 37 participants.

Findings

Quantitative results indicate that non‐work developers provide more overall support than work developers. Support from non‐work developers is positively associated with career satisfaction and life satisfaction. In contrast, support from work developers is positively associated with salary level and career satisfaction. Qualitative data indicate differences in the sub‐functions and quality of support offered by work versus non‐work relationships, particularly in terms of role modeling.

Research limitations/implications

Developmental relationships from different domains emphasize different sub‐functions of support and differentially affect career outcomes. While broad functions – career support, psychosocial support, and role modeling – are identifiable across domains, non‐work relationships provide some distinct sub‐functions from work relationships.

Practical implications

Practicing managers should develop and maintain developmental networks that extend beyond the boundaries of their current organization. Human resource professionals will want to consider how well their initiatives encourage individuals to enlist a variety of potential developers into their networks.

Originality/value

The findings indicate that non‐work relationships are a critical part of developmental networks and individuals' career success.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 15 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 October 2011

Yan Shen and Kathy E. Kram

The purpose of this paper is to examine expatriates' developmental networks in terms of their structure and content.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine expatriates' developmental networks in terms of their structure and content.

Design/methodology/approach

The study employed in‐depth interviews with 64 expatriate professionals and managers in Singapore and China.

Findings

The study highlights the unique characteristics of expatriates' developmental networks in cross‐cultural contexts including the nature of cross‐border and culturally diversified network structures, the dominance of psychosocial support, and the importance of cross‐cultural transition support.

Research limitations/implications

Expatriates' self reports and retrospective sense‐making may suffer from hindsight bias and/or attribution bias. A longitudinal study that follows expatriates over time is necessary to examine relationship dynamics through different relocation stages.

Practical implications

The findings suggest the necessity for companies to recognize the limited role of formal mentoring in expatriates' overseas adjustment and relocation success, and to encourage a wider range of developmental relationships that comprise expatriates' developmental networks.

Originality/value

This paper makes two main contributions to the mentoring, developmental networks, and expatriate literature. First, it highlights the necessity of using “network base” as a new structural dimension of developmental networks to examine expatriation and repatriation adjustment. Second, it points out the importance of psychosocial and cross‐cultural transition support in expatriates' relocation success.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 16 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 April 2016

Rimjhim Banerjee-Batist and Thomas G. Reio

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationships between attachment styles, mentoring (psychosocial support and career support), organizational commitment, and…

1013

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationships between attachment styles, mentoring (psychosocial support and career support), organizational commitment, and turnover intent of protégés in formal faculty mentoring.

Design/methodology/approach

An internet survey was conducted with a population of 125 protégés in a formal faculty mentoring program at a US university.

Findings

Results from linear regression analyses revealed that protégés’ secure attachment was positively and significantly related with their organizational commitment and was negatively and significantly related to intent to turnover. Additional linear regression analyses revealed that psychosocial support and career support were positively and significantly related with protégé organizational commitment and were negatively and significantly related to intent to turnover. Hierarchical regression showed that secure attachment alone was a unique predictor of protégés’ organizational commitment and intent to turnover. Further, attachment and career support interacted to predict both organizational commitment and intent to turnover.

Research limitations/implications

Although psychosocial support and career support in mentoring influence organizational commitment and turnover intent, protégés who are securely attached experience more support. Furthermore, career support the positive association between secure attachment and organizational commitment and the negative association between secure attachment and turnover intent.

Originality/value

Little research has specifically addressed attachment and its links to mentoring and organizational outcomes such as organizational commitment and turnover intent in the context of faculty mentoring. Therefore, the study contributes to the understanding of how attachment and mentoring influence organizational commitment and turnover intent in academe.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 35 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 March 2021

Chantal van Esch, William Luse and Robert L. Bonner

This study examined the effects of gender and pandemic concerns on mentorship seeking behavior during the pandemic caused by the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) and its…

Abstract

Purpose

This study examined the effects of gender and pandemic concerns on mentorship seeking behavior during the pandemic caused by the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) and its relationship to self-efficacy.

Design/methodology/approach

This study analyzes the data collected from 253 academics in a quantitative survey administered online.

Findings

Women and those with higher levels of concern about the COVID-19 pandemic were more likely to seek mentorship. During this time of uncertainty role modeling was sought more than career support and psychosocial support. All three functions of mentorship seeking were positively associated with higher levels of self-efficacy.

Research limitations/implications

The present study finds that individuals turn to mentors when they are concerned about macro-level events (e.g. a global pandemic). Additionally, individuals who self-identify as women sought mentorship to a greater extent than men. In this way, it is not only the situation that matters (like women having fewer resources and more demands than men) but also the perception of a situation (like how concerned individuals were about the COVID-19 pandemic). Additionally, this paper helps to further develop the understanding of the mentorship function of role modeling.

Practical implications

Organizations and mentors ought to be cognizant of role modeling during times of crisis, especially for women, this may be counterintuitive to the inclination to provide career and psychosocial support for mentees.

Originality/value

This study examines the gendered implications for mentoring during the COVID-19 pandemic. This study specifically examines mentorship seeking behavior and its influence on self-efficacy during uncertain times.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 41 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 July 2015

Frankie J. Weinberg, Jay P. Mulki and Melenie J. Lankau

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of mentor beliefs about effort related to the knowledge and learning process on their extent of mentoring at work, and to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of mentor beliefs about effort related to the knowledge and learning process on their extent of mentoring at work, and to determine the role that the mentor’s perception of psychological safety plays in tempering this relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

This study was conducted at an 820-member organization maintenance and operations organization consisting of a number of professions in which apprenticeship-style learning is prevalent. Data collection resulted in 570 members self-identifying as having mentored a less experienced colleague. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to confirm that the measurement instrument represents one unified factor, and a structural equation modelling approach was used to assess the relationships among the study’s latent variables.

Findings

Results reveal that mentors who hold sophisticated effort-oriented beliefs are more likely to offer psychosocial support to their protégés. Further, although the relationship between effort-oriented beliefs and vocational support is not significant, the mentor’s perception of a psychologically safe work environment significantly moderates both sets of relationships.

Research limitations/implications

As approximately 88 per cent of respondents work in service, as opposed to administrative groups, caution should be exercised in generalizing this study’s findings to the general workforce population. Further, the present study did not differentiate mentors who identified a current or previous subordinate as their protégé from those whose protégés were not a subordinate, nor did the authors differentiate formal from informal mentoring relationships. Thus, further investigation is needed to determine whether our hypothesized relationships differ in any unique manifestations of mentoring relationships at work.

Practical implications

By providing a better understanding of the relationship between effort-oriented beliefs and mentoring at work, this study may help in the design of more effective mentoring relationships and ultimately enhance knowledge management and workplace learning.

Originality/value

There is no previous research that investigates how one’s cognitions about the effort associated with the knowledge and learning process, in particular, influence mentoring at work. This study provides a model for understanding and developing enhanced mentoring relationships, which are considered a critical element of organizational learning.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 27 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 May 2010

Rowena Ortiz‐Walters, Kimberly‐Ann Eddleston and Kathleen Simione

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of gender identity on protégés' satisfaction with mentoring relationships. More specifically, it aims to investigate…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of gender identity on protégés' satisfaction with mentoring relationships. More specifically, it aims to investigate whether or not a protégé's feminine or masculine identity, by virtue of emphasizing different criteria, roles, and preferences, impacts his or her satisfaction with the performance of a mentor.

Design/methodology/approach

Managers and/or professionals, identified by in‐career MBA students at large universities in the East, completed surveys to assess relationship satisfaction as a mentoring outcome.

Findings

The results of this study indicate that masculine protégés, who strongly identify with their career roles, report being more satisfied with mentors who provide career development support. Conversely, feminine protégés, who measure career success using socio‐emotional‐based criteria, report being more satisfied with mentors who provide psychosocial support.

Research limitations/implications

The study is limited in its generalizability due to the type of sample studied. The sample consisted of managers from a variety of male‐dominated occupations. In addition, since the data were self‐reported on a single survey, common method bias may also be an issue.

Practical implications

Despite limitations, the study implies that assessment of gender identity and related skills can provide organizations with more effective guidance and matching of mentors and protégés to maximize perceived satisfaction on the part of the protégé.

Originality/value

Although many studies have investigated a variety of factors that affect mentoring, few have examined the influence of gender identity on the functioning of these relationships.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 February 2014

Laura Gail Lunsford

A psychosocial, developmental perspective was used to examine the mentoring experiences of scientists. Little is known about the timing of when mentors first appear, the…

2600

Abstract

Purpose

A psychosocial, developmental perspective was used to examine the mentoring experiences of scientists. Little is known about the timing of when mentors first appear, the quality of these relationships, the specific mentoring support behaviors, or how scientists typically learn to mentor. The paper aims to discuss the above issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The author conducted 23, semi-structured interviews with Australian scientists. Questions focussed on mentor-like support scientists received and provided. Interviews were analyzed and themes were coded using Dedoose software.

Findings

Scientists who had mentors as undergraduates were more likely to report long-lasting relationships with their mentors and more positive interactions with their protégés. Scientists reported the following career mentoring behaviors: modeling how to do science, sponsorship, collaboration, and practical supervision. Important psychosocial mentoring behaviors were being approachable, building confidence and providing encouragement. Almost half of the scientists never had a mentor. Most (n=14) scientists learned to mentor by emulating their mentors. Findings highlight the prevalence of dysfunctional behaviors, even in supportive relationships.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that graduate program managers might consider investing resources to improve mentoring experiences of doctoral students as this is a critical period for their professional development. Further, activities involving collaboration deserve emphasis in mentoring relationships.

Originality/value

The study identified a “window” when mentoring support is important for scientists; highlighted specific behaviors that support career development in science; and clarified how some scientists learn to mentor others. Results add to the literature on dysfunctional mentoring relationships.

Details

International Journal of Mentoring and Coaching in Education, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6854

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 June 2019

Chunjiang Yang, Nan Guo, Yuting Wang and Chunling Li

Mentoring was considered as an efficient way to facilitate staff attachment with hotels. Such a strong attachment has been demonstrated to reduce employees’ intention to…

1820

Abstract

Purpose

Mentoring was considered as an efficient way to facilitate staff attachment with hotels. Such a strong attachment has been demonstrated to reduce employees’ intention to quit. This study aims to investigate the mediating roles of organizational and occupational embeddedness in the relationships between mentoring functions and turnover intention.

Design/methodology/approach

The responses were collected from a sample of 354 employees in four hotels group across three Chinese provinces. A structural equation model (SEM) was applied to test the model and mediating roles of organizational and occupational embeddedness.

Findings

The results of SEM suggest that both organizational and occupational embeddedness mediated the relationships between mentoring functions (career and psychosocial support) and turnover intention. Specifically, employees who are able to receive successful mentoring can easily embed in their organization and occupation. Thus, these employees are reluctant to leave.

Research limitations/implications

Although this study reveals the important role of mediation, it has several limitations. First, the data drawn from Hebei, Beijing and Zhejiang provinces may lack geography representativeness. Second, this paper neglects potential moderating role of certain personal or context factors. Third, the time lag between the three data collections are not the same.

Practical implications

Managers should retain proper employees by introducing mentoring programs. Furthermore, to increase organizational and occupational embeddedness, managers should also consider the person-organization/occupation attachments of this industry.

Originality/value

This study tests organizational and occupational embeddedness simultaneously as mediators between mentoring and turnover intention through data obtained from the Chinese hotels.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 31 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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