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Book part
Publication date: 13 August 2018

Robert L. Dipboye

Abstract

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The Emerald Review of Industrial and Organizational Psychology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-786-9

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Book part
Publication date: 30 June 2004

Lynn M Shore, Lois E Tetrick, M.Susan Taylor, Jaqueline A.-M Coyle Shapiro, Robert C Liden, Judi McLean Parks, Elizabeth Wolfe Morrison, Lyman W Porter, Sandra L Robinson, Mark V Roehling, Denise M Rousseau, René Schalk, Anne S Tsui and Linn Van Dyne

The employee-organization relationship (EOR) has increasingly become a focal point for researchers in organizational behavior, human resource management, and industrial…

Abstract

The employee-organization relationship (EOR) has increasingly become a focal point for researchers in organizational behavior, human resource management, and industrial relations. Literature on the EOR has developed at both the individual – (e.g. psychological contracts) and the group and organizational-levels of analysis (e.g. employment relationships). Both sets of literatures are reviewed, and we argue for the need to integrate these literatures as a means for improving understanding of the EOR. Mechanisms for integrating these literatures are suggested. A subsequent discussion of contextual effects on the EOR follows in which we suggest that researchers develop models that explicitly incorporate context. We then examine a number of theoretical lenses to explain various attributes of the EOR such as the dynamism and fairness of the exchange, and new ways of understanding the exchange including positive functional relationships and integrative negotiations. The article concludes with a discussion of future research needed on the EOR.

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Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-103-3

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Article
Publication date: 2 July 2018

Martin Morgan Tuuli

The purpose of this paper is to explore the impact of project settings on empowerment experiences of individuals and teams by examining the effects of specific project…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the impact of project settings on empowerment experiences of individuals and teams by examining the effects of specific project characteristics on facets of the empowerment concept (i.e. the structural and psychological perspectives).

Design/methodology/approach

A parallel questionnaire survey of client, consultant and contractor organisations was conducted in Hong Kong to test hypotheses relating three facets of the empowerment concept and five project-level antecedents. Hierarchical linear modelling and ordinary least square regression were employed to test the hypotheses.

Findings

The analyses show that dynamic project environments, high project team integration and high interdependence of project tasks lead to high individual psychological empowerment, while public-client projects (compared with private-client projects), a hostile project environment and high client integration lead to a low individual psychological empowerment. Uncertainty in project technology also leads to high team psychological empowerment, while hostile project environments lead to low team psychological empowerment. Further, dynamic project environments lead to more empowering work climate, while hostile project environments lead to less empowering work climate. However, project team integration, project complexity, project lifecycle and quasi-public-client projects (compared with private-client projects) have no significant association with the empowerment of individuals and teams.

Originality/value

This study examined task-related factors (i.e. project in this case) which traditionally have not been the focus of studies examining the antecedents of empowerment. Further, project-level antecedents and their link to an integrated perspective of empowerment comprising a sociostructural perspective, a psychological perspective and a team-based perspective are examined, which is a significant departure from the unitary perspective of empowerment taken in most previous studies.

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International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

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Article
Publication date: 7 June 2013

Harveen Chugh

The purpose of this paper is to explore the involvement of technology transfer officers in the development of university start‐ups from a psychological ownership perspective.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the involvement of technology transfer officers in the development of university start‐ups from a psychological ownership perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

A three‐year qualitative study of three university start‐ups was conducted using a longitudinal, case study and theory building design, whereby the theoretical perspective of psychological ownership was linked to the data during the analysis stage.

Findings

When university start‐ups are running low on funds, technology transfer officers develop psychological ownership for the start‐up through the investment of the self and control routes (Pierce et al., 2001, 2003).

Originality/value

There is a paucity of empirical studies that examine psychological ownership in new venture creation. This study shows technology transfer officers develop psychological ownership for the university start‐up they are working with and contributes to both the psychological ownership and entrepreneurship literatures.

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International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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Article
Publication date: 14 May 2018

Haiyan Kong, Xinyu Jiang, Wilco Chan and Xiaoge Zhou

This study aims to conduct an overview of previous studies on job satisfaction, particularly its determinants and outcomes, and the research objectives, main themes and…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to conduct an overview of previous studies on job satisfaction, particularly its determinants and outcomes, and the research objectives, main themes and years of publication of previous studies. This study also seeks to analyze research trends on job satisfaction in the field of hospitality and tourism.

Design/methodology/approach

The top hospitality and tourism journals were reviewed, and relevant papers were searched using the keyword “job satisfaction.” Content analysis was performed to identify the research objectives, main themes, influencing factors, outcomes and journals.

Findings

A total of 143 refereed journal papers were collected, of which 128 papers explored the influencing factors of job satisfaction, and 53 papers aimed to investigate outcomes. The predictors of job satisfaction were further classified into four groups, namely, organizational, individual, social and family and psychological factors.

Research limitations/implications

This study conducted a literature review on job satisfaction by using content analysis. A relatively comprehensive review of job satisfaction is provided. However, this preliminary study still has considerable room for improvement given the extensive studies on job satisfaction. Future studies may perform meta-analysis and attempt to find new values of job satisfaction.

Practical implications

Findings may shed light on practical management. From the individual perspective, education, interest and skills were found to be related to job satisfaction. Thus, managers should provide their employees with opportunities to train and update their skills. From the organizational perspective, organizational support and culture contributed positively to job satisfaction. This perspective highlighted the importance of effective management activities and policies. From the social and family perspective, family–work supportive policies must be implemented to enhance job satisfaction. From the psychological perspective, psychological issues were found to be closely related to job satisfaction. Thus, the employees’ stress should be reduced to ensure that they perform their jobs well.

Social implications

This study analyzed the determinants and outcomes of job satisfaction and highlighted the importance of enhancing job satisfaction from different perspectives. The interest of employees should be enhanced, their family–work conflict should be reduced and their psychological issues should be addressed to stimulate their enthusiasm. As job satisfaction contributes positively to organizational commitment and intention to stay, managers should conduct a series of organizational supportive activities to enhance job satisfaction, which will retain qualified employees.

Originality/value

This study conducted extensive research on job satisfaction and drew a systematic picture of job satisfaction on the basis of its determinants and outcomes, research objectives, main themes and journals. All findings were comprehensive and combined to contribute to the literature and serve as a foundation for further study.

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International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 30 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 4 June 2018

Hang Zhu, Pengxiang Zhang, Xiaoyan Han and Ting Huang

The purpose of this paper is to unveil how family involvement in management teams of private Chinese companies affects professional managers’ psychological ownership and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to unveil how family involvement in management teams of private Chinese companies affects professional managers’ psychological ownership and sense of “us”, in the hopes of understanding why their devotion cannot coexist with the higher level of commitment of family managers.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper includes two main studies. The first uses regression to analyze survey data provided by 165 professional managers working in Chinese private companies. The second is a scenario experiment in which 106 MBA candidates participate.

Findings

The study finds that there is a negative relationship between family management involvement and professional managers’ perceived relationship closeness to owners and psychological ownership of firms. It also finds that relationship closeness fully mediates the negative influence of family management involvement on managers’ psychological ownership.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to both the theoretical literature and management practice. From a theoretical perspective, it connects studies in indigenous sociological psychology with new literature on psychological ownership. The paper finds that personal relationships nurture the shared psychological ownership of managers by generating a sense of “us”, providing a new theoretical explanation for its formation process. Furthermore, this study offers an explanation for the negative signal effect of family involvement in management. From a practical perspective, this study finds that family involvement in management acts as a critical boundary condition for using personal relationships to stimulate professional managers.

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Nankai Business Review International, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8749

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Article
Publication date: 12 February 2018

Patrick Hartmann, Vanessa Apaolaza and Clare D’Souza

This paper aims to address the role of psychological empowerment in proenvironmental consumer behaviour, focussing on climate protection.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to address the role of psychological empowerment in proenvironmental consumer behaviour, focussing on climate protection.

Design/methodology/approach

Study 1 analyses the interaction of the effects of psychological empowerment and personal norms on two environmental behaviours with a sample of 600 individuals drawn form a representative online panel of the Australian population. Study 2 addresses the reinforcing influence of empowerment with a quasi-experimental design comparing 300 consumers of green electricity with 300 conventional electricity clients.

Findings

Psychological empowerment moderates the effects of personal norms on climate-protective consumer behaviour in a value-belief-norm (VBN) framework. Personal norms have a stronger influence for consumers experiencing high psychological empowerment than for disempowered feeling consumers. Furthermore, psychological empowerment experienced as an outcome of actual proenvironmental behaviour mediates the relationship between prior climate protection and future climate-protective intentions.

Research limitations/implications

Future research should focus on the experimental manipulation of psychological empowerment with communicational claims, studying how perceived empowerment can be enhanced.

Practical implications

To promote climate friendly products and behaviours, marketers should use communication claims aimed at enhancing consumer’s subjective experience of empowerment.

Social implications

Public policy aimed at climate protection should focus on consumer education increasing consumers’ awareness of their potential influence.

Originality/value

Psychological empowerment has not been studied previously as either an antecedent or outcome of proenvironmental behaviour. This is the first study to show that psychological empowerment moderates normative influences on climate-protective consumer behaviour. This research further reveals a novel behavioural reinforcement process, in which psychological empowerment intervenes as a behavioural outcome as well as an antecedent of climate-protective consumer behaviour. Findings contribute to the development of the VBN framework as well as to the consumer-empowerment perspective on proenvironmental behaviour.

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European Journal of Marketing, vol. 52 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2000

Thomas N. Garavan, Patrick Gunnigle and Michael Morley

Addresses some of the key debates within the HRD literature and considers the extent to which HRD can be described as a field of study. The paper addresses the issues…

Abstract

Addresses some of the key debates within the HRD literature and considers the extent to which HRD can be described as a field of study. The paper addresses the issues raised in the contributions that make up this special issue and identifies a broad range of methodologies and use of research methods. It argues that all of the contributions fit into at least one theoretical perspective: capabilities, psychological contacts and the learning organization/organizational learning. The paper concludes with a consideration of the prescriptions which the perspectives advocate for HRD in organizations.

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Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 24 no. 2/3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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Article
Publication date: 8 April 2019

Kanchan Mukherjee and Divya Upadhyay

This paper aims to explore the psychological antecedents and processes that lead to competitive or cooperative attitudes in conflict management using the lens of construal…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the psychological antecedents and processes that lead to competitive or cooperative attitudes in conflict management using the lens of construal level theory (CLT). CLT suggests that adopting a distal versus proximal psychological perspective changes the way people think and behave. This research explores the systematic effect of these abstract versus concrete mental construals on preferred conflict management styles.

Design/methodology/approach

First, theoretically grounded hypotheses linking different mental construals to cooperative and competitive conflict management styles were formulated. Subsequently, four empirical studies were conducted to test the hypotheses.

Findings

The studies provide support to the hypotheses showing that high construal abstract thinking is linked to preference for cooperation while low construal thinking is linked to preference for competition. Further, two different psychological processes mediate participants’ preferences for cooperative and competitive conflict management styles, the former mediated by perspective taking and empathic concern and the latter by impulsivity and aggression.

Research limitations/implications

The research measures conflict management styles rather than actual behavior. Also, focus is on trait mental construals rather than priming of high or low construal thinking.

Practical implications

Deeper understanding of the psychology of cooperative and competitive conflict management styles can help parties attain better outcomes and can potentially contribute to training and talent development by educating conflict management practitioners.

Social implications

The findings of this research can potentially inform effective interventions aimed at reducing intergroup conflicts.

Originality/value

Mental construals and related psychological processes are linked to conflict management styles for the first time.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

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Article
Publication date: 2 December 2014

Joon Hyung Park, Je’Anna Lea Abbott and Steve Werner

– The purpose of this paper is to propose a model that explains how proactive cognitive processes, such as perspective-taking, relates to expatriates’ effectiveness.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose a model that explains how proactive cognitive processes, such as perspective-taking, relates to expatriates’ effectiveness.

Design/methodology/approach

This conceptual paper presents the model that is based on the perspective-taking models developed by Parker et al. (2008) and applies them to the expatriate context.

Findings

The authors present a framework that delineates how the perspective-taking process leads to an expatriate’s effectiveness. The authors provide propositions about which factors motivate expatriates to engage in perspective-taking and which factors influence higher accuracy of understanding of the host country nationals’ (HCN) perspective.

Practical implications

Guidance is provided for the training of expatriate to develop perspective-taking.

Originality/value

The paper expands the expatriate research by incorporating the perspective-taking model to identify which factors may motivate expatriates to see the HCN view point. Also, the paper contributes to the literature by identifying how resources such as expatriates’ psychological capital may promote the degree of accuracy or comprehension with respect to the HCN thoughts and feelings.

Details

Journal of Global Mobility, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-8799

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