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Article
Publication date: 7 November 2016

Thokozani Bvumbwe

The purpose of this paper is to explore newly graduated nurses’ experiences of their preparation for psychiatric nursing practice in Malawi. Knowledge of how basic or…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore newly graduated nurses’ experiences of their preparation for psychiatric nursing practice in Malawi. Knowledge of how basic or undergraduate nursing training programs prepare nurses for mental health services will inform educators to maximize the teaching and learning processes. Students are a key stakeholder in professional training hence an understanding of their experiences of training programs is critical.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative exploratory study was undertaken. In total, 16 newly graduated nurses with six months work experience at three psychiatric hospitals in Malawi were purposively sampled and recruited into the study. One to one interviews which lasted almost 45 minutes were conducted. Data were analyzed using content analysis.

Findings

Findings show that training programs fall short in preparing students for psychiatric nursing practice. Participants reported little attention to the specialty as compared to other specialties by educators. Inadequate academic support during practice sessions was highlighted by the majority of participants.

Research limitations/implications

The study needed to compare the findings with experiences of students who have been allocated to other nursing specialties.

Originality/value

Psychiatric nursing specialty remains the least preferred career choice for many nursing students. However, preservice nursing education programs are expected to socialize, motivate and prepare students for psychiatric practice as well. It is therefore critical to understand gaps that exist in student preparation for psychiatric nursing services in order to improve mental health training.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 11 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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Article
Publication date: 15 February 2016

John M Majer, Hannah M Chapman and Leonard A Jason

– The purpose of this paper is to compare the effects of two types of community-based, residential treatment programs among justice involved persons with dual diagnoses.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to compare the effects of two types of community-based, residential treatment programs among justice involved persons with dual diagnoses.

Design/methodology/approach

A randomized clinical trial examined treatment conditions among justice involved persons with substance use disorders who reported high baseline levels of psychiatric severity indicative of diagnosable psychiatric comorbidity. Participants (n=39) were randomly assigned to one of three treatment conditions upon discharge from inpatient treatment for substance use disorders: a professionally staffed, integrated residential treatment setting (therapeutic community), a self-run residential setting (Oxford House), or a treatment-specific aftercare referral (usual care). Levels of psychiatric severity, a global estimate of current psychopathological problem severity, were measured at two years as the outcome.

Findings

Participants randomly assigned to residential conditions reported significant reductions in psychiatric severity whereas those assigned to the usual care condition reported significant increases. There were no significant differences in psychiatric severity levels between residential conditions.

Research limitations/implications

Findings suggest that cost-effective, self-run residential settings such as Oxford Houses provide benefits comparable to professionally run residential integrated treatments for justice involved persons who have dual diagnoses.

Social implications

Results support the utilization of low-cost, community-based treatments for a highly marginalized population.

Originality/value

Little is known about residential treatments that reduce psychiatric severity for this population. Results extend the body of knowledge regarding the effects of community-based, residential integrated treatment and the Oxford House model.

Details

Advances in Dual Diagnosis, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0972

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Article
Publication date: 13 September 2021

Kristin Klimley, Bethany Broj, Brittany Plombon, Caroline Haskamp, Rachel Christopher, Estefania Masias, Vincent B. Van Hasselt and Ryan A. Black

Police officers are increasingly interacting with individuals with mental illnesses. Officers who encounter these persons have three choices: detain, arrest and transport…

Abstract

Purpose

Police officers are increasingly interacting with individuals with mental illnesses. Officers who encounter these persons have three choices: detain, arrest and transport to a correctional facility; resolve the situation informally; or initiate an involuntary psychiatric admission. The decision to place someone under an involuntary psychiatric admission is based on a variety of factors. This paper aims to collaborate with two metropolitan Police Departments in South Florida to explore individual and departmental factors that contribute to involuntary psychiatric admissions initiated by their officers.

Design/methodology/approach

This investigation examined 1,625 police reports of involuntary psychiatric admissions in 2013, 2014 and 2015. Descriptive statistics for the entire sample were computed, and percentages of Crisis Intervention Team (CIT)-trained officers for both departments in each year were determined.

Findings

Results highlighted differences in rates of involuntary commitments, CIT-trained officers and associated variables (e.g. mental health diagnoses, substance use) between the two cities.

Practical implications

Implications of the findings, and directions that future research in this area might take, are discussed.

Originality/value

There is a dearth of literature pertaining to involuntary psychiatric admissions in general and factors specific to involuntary psychiatric admissions initiated by police. This paper adds preliminary findings and implications to this body of research.

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Article
Publication date: 10 June 2014

Rachel Strimas, Michelle M. Dionne, Stephanie E. Cassin, Susan Wnuk, Marlene Taube-Schiff and Sanjeev Sockalingam

Evidence suggests high rates of psychiatric disorders in bariatric surgery candidates (e.g. Mitchell et al., 2012), although no rigorous studies have examined the…

Abstract

Purpose

Evidence suggests high rates of psychiatric disorders in bariatric surgery candidates (e.g. Mitchell et al., 2012), although no rigorous studies have examined the prevalence in a Canadian sample. Improved understanding of the prevalence of psychopathology among female patients is an important area of study, as females comprise approximately 80 percent of surgical candidates (Martin et al., 2010; Padwal, 2005). The purpose of this paper is to assess the prevalence of Axis I disorders and associations with quality of life in a Canadian sample of female bariatric surgery candidates.

Design/methodology/approach

Female patients (n=257) were assessed using a structured psychodiagnostic interview and completed a health-related quality of life questionnaire.

Findings

Results indicated that 57.2 percent of patients met DSM-IV-TR criteria for a lifetime psychiatric disorder and 18.3 percent met criteria for a current psychiatric disorder. Major depressive disorder was the most common lifetime psychiatric disorder (35.0 percent) and binge eating disorder was the most prevalent current psychiatric disorder (6.6 percent). Patients scored significantly lower than Canadian population norms on all domains of the SF-36 (all p's<0.001). Patients with a current Axis I disorder also reported significantly worse functioning on four mental health domains and one physical health domain (p's<0.01) compared to patients without a current Axis I disorder.

Originality/value

Results confirm high rates of psychiatric disorders in Canadian female bariatric surgery candidates and provide evidence for associated functional health impairment. Further study is needed to elucidate how pre-operative psychopathology may impact female patients’ post-operative outcomes.

Details

Ethnicity and Inequalities in Health and Social Care, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0980

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2003

Theodore Mutale

Although substance misuse by adolescents is widespread, few previous studies have investigated illicit drug use in adolescent psychiatric populations. The literature on…

Abstract

Although substance misuse by adolescents is widespread, few previous studies have investigated illicit drug use in adolescent psychiatric populations. The literature on adolescent substance misuse has focused on risk factors, and protective factors have received little or no attention. The study examined substance misuse and its correlates among young people referred to a regional adolescent psychiatric service. Co‐morbidity of substance misuse and psychiatric disorder was discussed, and the possible role of substance misuse as a gateway to adolescent offending examined. Recommendations for the development of adolescent substance misuse services are made.

Details

The British Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6646

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Article
Publication date: 13 July 2015

Tamsin Newlove-Delgado, Darren Moore, Obioha C Ukoumunne, Ken Stein and Tamsin Ford

The purpose of this paper is to describe mental health-related contact with educational professionals amongst children in the British Child and Adolescent Mental Health…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe mental health-related contact with educational professionals amongst children in the British Child and Adolescent Mental Health Survey (BCAMHS) 2004.

Design/methodology/approach

BCAMHS 2004 was a community-based survey of 5,325 children aged 5-16, with follow-up in 2007. This paper reports the percentage of children with a psychiatric disorder that had mental health-related contact with education professionals (categorised as teachers or specialist education services) and the percentage with specific types of psychiatric disorders amongst those contacting services.

Findings

Two-thirds (66.1 per cent, 95 per cent CI: 62.4-69.8 per cent) of children with a psychiatric disorder had contact with a teacher regarding their mental health and 31.1 per cent (95 per cent CI: 27.5-34.7 per cent) had contact with special education either in 2004 or 2007, or both. Over half of children reporting special education contact (55.1 per cent, 95 per cent CI: 50.0-60.2 per cent) and almost a third reporting teacher contact in relation to mental health (32.1 per cent, 95 per cent CI: 29.7-34.6 per cent) met criteria for a psychiatric disorder.

Practical implications

Many children in contact with education professionals regarding mental health experienced clinical levels of difficulty. Training is needed to ensure that contact leads to prompt intervention and referral if necessary.

Originality/value

This is the first paper to report on mental health-related service contact with education professionals in the 2004 BCAMHS survey along with its 2007 follow-up. It identifies high levels of teacher contact which represent challenges in supporting staff with training, resources and access to mental health services.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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Article
Publication date: 29 November 2013

Aikaterini Nomidou

The purpose of this paper is to assess the quality of healthcare offered by a Greek Public Psychiatric Clinic. Special attention is paid to the degree to which the Clinic…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the quality of healthcare offered by a Greek Public Psychiatric Clinic. Special attention is paid to the degree to which the Clinic promotes human rights, social inclusion, and autonomy.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper opted for an exploratory study using the open-ended approach of grounded theory, including 21 depth interviews with patients, staff members and patients’ relatives, documentation review and observation by an independent assessment team consisting of the author, a sociologist with mental disabilities, and a psychologist using the World Health Organization QualityRights tool kit which uses the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) as its frame. The data complemented by a group discussion with employees in another Clinic of the same hospital.

Findings

The paper provides empirical insights about how the steps taken by the Psychiatric Clinic to address several of the themes drawn from the CRPD require either improvement or initiation to comply fully with the convention's themes, and how this compares unfavorably with the Urology Clinic.

Research limitations/implications

Sample size and restriction of the data to only one mental health facility limit the generalizibility of the results. Staff who reported professional burnout and cuts in wages may have been be susceptible to recall bias due to current negative mood. Respondent patients may also have failed to disclose their true experiences due to fear of punishment.

Originality/value

The paper uses a new methodology and instrument to assess current practice in mental health facilities in relation to international human rights standards emanating from the CRPD as well as the degree of parity between mental health and general health services.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2000

J. Parkes

A review of literature concerning the over‐representation of young, African‐Caribbean males within secure psychiatric services.

Abstract

A review of literature concerning the over‐representation of young, African‐Caribbean males within secure psychiatric services.

Details

The British Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6646

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Article
Publication date: 2 October 2017

Eddie Chaplin, Jane McCarthy and Andrew Forrester

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of liaison and diversion services working in the lower courts (also known as Magistrates’ courts) with regard to autism…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of liaison and diversion services working in the lower courts (also known as Magistrates’ courts) with regard to autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) and their assessment, in particular, the role of pre-sentence and psychiatric reports and interviews.

Design/methodology/approach

Current practice is described in the lower courts in the context of current legislation and procedures.

Findings

When writing reports, there is a need for expertise to offer an opinion on future risk, disposal and what needs to be in place to support people with ASDs. No assumptions should be made when reporting on the basis of an ASD diagnosis alone and each case must be assessed on its individual merits while ensuring that individual human rights are protected.

Originality/value

There is currently a sparse literature examining ASD in court settings. This paper seeks to clarify the current practice.

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2005

Michael Loughran and Kishane Seewoonarain

High levels of need and complexity were identified in women referred to and accepted by the inreach team in HMP & YOI Bullwood Hall during the first two years of…

Abstract

High levels of need and complexity were identified in women referred to and accepted by the inreach team in HMP & YOI Bullwood Hall during the first two years of operation. They included mental health problems, personality disorder, substance misuse and social factors. During the first and second years of operation, there were 124 and 194 referrals respectively. Prevalence of substance misuse was high, and a large proportion of women were involved in multi‐drug use. Low mood was the most common reason for referral. The prevalence of intentional self‐injury was high, and was significantly associated with previous suicide attempts, history of abuse and personality disorder traits. A number of factors were identified that compromised effective through‐care to the community, including lack of accommodation and primary care access on release, and that disrupted the connectivity of care. These factors contributed to the social exclusion of this vulnerable group.

Details

The British Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6646

Keywords

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