Search results

1 – 10 of over 2000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 4 July 2016

Kristen Marcussen and Christian Ritter

This chapter examines the effects of mental health services and stigma on changes in self-concept and well-being for individuals with SPMI.

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter examines the effects of mental health services and stigma on changes in self-concept and well-being for individuals with SPMI.

Methodology/approach

Data for this chapter come from structured interviews and service data for 140 individuals with severe and persistent mental illnesses. We use structural equation modeling to examine the relationship between perceived and internalized stigma, as well as the relationships among stigma, self-concept (self-esteem and mastery), and well-being (quality of life and functioning).

Findings

We find that case management is negatively related to quality of life and psychiatric services are positively related to functioning. Crisis services and assessment are associated with mastery in opposite directions. Internalized stigma is positively associated with self-esteem and mastery, and negatively associated with functioning. We do not find a relationship between services and stigma.

Research limitations/implications

A limitation to this chapter is the sample size, which prohibits us from examining a full range of services and outcomes. Nonetheless, our findings provide information about how services and stigma impact well-being, and may be used as a starting point for considering strategies for improving services and reducing stigma. Future work should consider pairing outcomes with services to determine their effectiveness.

Originality/value

This chapter builds on previous research that examines the relative effects of services and stigma among individuals in community health care by extending measures of both services and stigma, and by examining the relationship between them, in order to better determine their implications for self-concept and well-being.

Details

50 Years After Deinstitutionalization: Mental Illness in Contemporary Communities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-403-4

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 28 December 2006

Kathleen Biebel and Jeffrey L. Geller

A system of care is a function-specific, rather than agency-specific approach defined as a “comprehensive spectrum of mental health and other necessary services which are…

Abstract

A system of care is a function-specific, rather than agency-specific approach defined as a “comprehensive spectrum of mental health and other necessary services which are organized into a coordinated network to meet the multiple and changing needs of children and adolescents with severe emotional disturbances and their families” (Stroul & Friedman, 1986). A system of care provides a mental health delivery system for children with SED with a wide array of accessible, community-based services that focus on children's individual needs, include the family in treatment planning, and provide culturally competent services. System of care services are provided by multiple child serving agencies and are collaborative and coordinated (Stroul & Friedman, 1986).

Details

Research on Community-Based Mental Health Services for Children and Adolescents
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-416-4

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2001

David Edwards

Abstract

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 8 December 2007

Sue Gena Lurie

Social and economic trends toward local governance form the context for health and mental health policy and the reorganization of care systems for cost-containment in the…

Abstract

Social and economic trends toward local governance form the context for health and mental health policy and the reorganization of care systems for cost-containment in the United States. Local management of public–private collaborations is promoted by state agencies as a means of rationalizing mental health care and community support services. This chapter analyses the local process of developing public–private partnerships for mental health care, based on an ethnographic case study of county Mental Health/Mental Retardation and behavioral health committees and coalitions in Texas, from 1995 to 2001. Following this period, local service agencies continued collaboration to increase community awareness and resources for care. Findings were that while the rapid transition to local control under conditions of reduced resources impeded implementation of a public–private mental health care system, commitment to a service safety net for persons with mental disabilities was sustained.

Details

The Economics of Health and Wellness: Anthropological Perspectives
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-490-4

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 28 December 2006

Tracy J. Pinkard and Leonard Bickman

Two major reform movements have shaped child and adolescent mental health services over the past quarter-century: the Systems of Care movement, and more recently, the…

Abstract

Two major reform movements have shaped child and adolescent mental health services over the past quarter-century: the Systems of Care movement, and more recently, the movement toward evidence-based practice. Results from several studies indicate that youth served in traditional residential or inpatient care may experience difficulty re-entering their natural environments, or were released into physically and emotionally unsafe homes (Bruns & Burchard, 2000; President's Commission on Mental Health, 1978; Stortz, 2000; Stroul & Friedman, 1986; U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 1999). The cost of hospitalizing youth also became a policy concern (Henggeler et al., 1999b; Kielser, 1993; U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 1999). For example, it is estimated that from the late 1980s through 1990 inpatient treatment consumed nearly half of all expenditures for child and adolescent mental health care although the services were found not to be very effective (Burns, 1991; Burns & Friedman, 1990). More recent analyses indicate that at least 1/3 of all mental health expenditures for youth are associated with inpatient hospitalization (Ringel & Sturm, 2001).

Details

Research on Community-Based Mental Health Services for Children and Adolescents
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-416-4

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 9 March 2015

Christopher Alan Griffiths, Samira Heinkel and Bohdana Dock

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the impact on recovery and personal goal attainment of a transition intervention service for return to the community following…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the impact on recovery and personal goal attainment of a transition intervention service for return to the community following exit from an alternative to psychiatric inpatient admission – a residential recovery house. The services seek to facilitate community reintegration, promote recovery and prevent future mental health crisis. The service was funded by the Stone Family Foundation.

Design/methodology/approach

This evaluation employed a within groups design: a single case evaluation follow-up. Analysis of Recovery Star and personal goal achievement data collected at service entry and exit points during routine practice (n=181), at four sites in England. The adults had mental illness diagnoses including depression, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, personality disorder, and anxiety disorder.

Findings

There was a significant increase in overall Recovery Star scores with a large effect size, and significant increases in eight of the ten Recovery Star life domains. There were significant increases in the goal scores linked to “Managing mental health”, “Self-care” and “Living skills”.

Practical implications

A transitional intervention service provided by the third sector for return to community following mental health crisis may contribute to recovery and personal goal achievement. A randomised control trial of this transition intervention service is recommended.

Originality/value

This is first outcome evaluation of an alternative to psychiatric inpatient admission transition intervention service and findings indicate the potential positive effect of having this service incorporated into the design of alternative to admission provision.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 16 September 2013

John Larsen and Christopher Griffiths

– To evaluate the impact of crisis house admission in terms of mental health recovery and achievement of personal goals for people using the service.

Abstract

Purpose

To evaluate the impact of crisis house admission in terms of mental health recovery and achievement of personal goals for people using the service.

Design/methodology/approach

Mental Health Recovery Star (Recovery Star) and Personal Goal Scoring data were collected at entry and exit points in routine practice as part of a bespoke support planning process from 722 adults using one of three Rethink Mental Illness Crisis Houses. The adults had mental illness diagnoses including depression, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, personality disorder, and anxiety disorder.

Findings

There were significant increases in all ten Recovery Star domains, for example: managing mental health (up 2.11 points (1-10 scale)), identity and self-esteem (up 1.56 points), trust and hope (up 1.48 points), and self-care (up 1.35 points). The analysis of Personal Goal Scoring data (scored on 1-10 scale) showed significant increases on how close people were to achieving their goals. For all goals listed there was an average increase of 2.5 point from 3 to 5.5, showing that people made progress during their stay in the service.

Practical implications

Services provided by the third sector may offer an important contribution to support people's recovery and prevent admission to psychiatric hospital.

Originality/value

The findings of the evaluation study support a growing body of evidence regarding the effectiveness of services offering alternatives to admission, and they highlight the value of using recovery-oriented support planning and outcome capture tools in routine practice.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Health and Illness in the Neoliberal Era in Europe
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-119-3

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

Mad Muse: The Mental Illness Memoir in a Writer's Life and Work
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-810-0

1 – 10 of over 2000