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1 – 10 of over 2000
Article
Publication date: 7 January 2020

Jian Pei Kong, Basmawati Baharom, Norshariza Jamhuri, Khalizah Jamli, Siti Farah Zaidah Mohd Yazid, Norafidza Ashiquin, Lina Isnin, Chooi Wah Leow and Siew Mee Lim

The provision of meals has long been regarded as an essential part of treatment of hospitalized patients complementing medical procedures and nursing management. Today…

Abstract

Purpose

The provision of meals has long been regarded as an essential part of treatment of hospitalized patients complementing medical procedures and nursing management. Today, despite changes in the health-care landscape, which focused on improving the quality and efficiency of hospital care, malnutrition among inpatient was still a common worldwide concern.

Design/methodology/approach

This was a multi-centre, randomized study conducted in 21 study sites comprising 21 state and specialist government hospitals under the Ministry of Health, Malaysia. The sample size for this study was calculated with purposive sampling method, followed by proportionate sampling to determine the random sample size of each of the study sites. The total sample size required for this study was 2,759 subjects. A validated data collection form was used in the study.

Findings

Only 32.2 % and 37.6 % of subjects achieved adequate energy and protein intake, respectively, during their admission to medical ward. The study result showed that the overall mean energy and protein intake was 794.6 ± 487.8 kcal and 35.2 ± 24.3 g, respectively. The estimated energy (p = 0.001) and protein (p = 0.001) intake of all study sites was significantly lower compared to the adequacy value.

Research limitations/implications

The adequacy intake in this study was only carried out in medical wards, thus reproducible result among other wards in different study sites could not be confirmed. Besides, this study assumed that the portion eaten by subjects during lunch and dinner was the same, and therefore, either one was recorded together with breakfast and either lunch or dinner to represent a subject’s daily intake.

Originality/value

This was the first nationwide study to report the adequacy of energy and protein intake of patients receiving therapeutic diets in the government hospital setting in Malaysia.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. 50 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 January 2014

Dare Akerele, Mohammed Kebiru Ibrahim and Samuel Adewuyi

– The study aimed to investigate the problem of malnutrition among Nigerian households with emphasis on protein and calorie intake.

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Abstract

Purpose

The study aimed to investigate the problem of malnutrition among Nigerian households with emphasis on protein and calorie intake.

Design/methodology/approach

Multi-stage random sampling approach was used to select 321 household members drawn from a total of 80 households. A combination of descriptive and inferential statistics was applied in analysing the data.

Findings

The study revealed that household income, dependency ratio, education and gender of household head, among others, are factors that would significantly influence per capita daily calorie and protein intake of households. Protein-energy malnutrition is more of inadequate calorie than protein intake. There was confirmatory evidence of inadequate consumption of calorie among pre-school and school age children, while adult male members seemed to consume the above requirements with the possibility of being at the risk of obesity. Though children were undernourished, they are unlikely to be marasmic.

Originality/value

The study examined the problem of malnutrition among Nigerian households with emphasis on protein and calorie intake. Socio-economic factors influencing per capita calorie and protein intakes as well as the possible risks of protein-energy malnutrition among household members were also examined. The patterns of intake of calorie and protein consumption among household members indicated the possibility of over-nutrition and under-nutrition coexisting among members of the households with over-nutrition and potential risks of obesity in adult males and under-nutrition among pre-school and school age children.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 41 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1999

Clara R.B. Oguntona, Monsurat Apoyin and Anne‐Marie Olateju

The food and nutrient intake of 250 (135 male, 115 female) adolescent Nigerian high school students have been surveyed to determine the contributions of different food…

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Abstract

The food and nutrient intake of 250 (135 male, 115 female) adolescent Nigerian high school students have been surveyed to determine the contributions of different food groups to their intakes of protein, calcium and iron. Twenty‐four‐hour dietary recall technique was used to obtain details of food intake and questionnaires administered to obtain social and economic circumstances of subjects’ family. Male subjects had more energy, protein, calcium and iron intake but no significant (p < 0.05) differences when compared with females. Cereal based foods were the most important sources of dietary protein, supplying between 40‐52 per cent for all subjects and 60 per cent or more for 29 per cent of the subjects. Proportions of dietary protein from legumes, meats, vegetables and roots ranged from10‐21 per cent, 3‐13 per cent, 7‐17 per cent, 6.5‐12.9 per cent respectively. Cereals were also the most important source of dietary calcium (56.8 per cent) and iron (33.16 per cent) for most subjects. The contribution of meats and legumes however, approximate that of cereals for 36 per cent of subjects. Apart from gender, residence at home or in boarding house and the socio‐economic status of the subject’s family significantly affect the sources of dietary protein, calcium and iron.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 99 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 June 2017

Joy W. Douglas, Jeannine C. Lawrence and Adam P. Knowlden

Food fortification with common kitchen ingredients has been suggested to improve nutritional intake. The purpose of this paper was to systematically review the efficacy of…

Abstract

Purpose

Food fortification with common kitchen ingredients has been suggested to improve nutritional intake. The purpose of this paper was to systematically review the efficacy of food fortification on calorie and protein intake among older adults.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic search was conducted using Boolean search logic and seven research databases to identify interventions using fortified foods to increase calorie and protein intake among older adults. Ten studies published in English since 1996 were eligible for inclusion. Study quality was evaluated using an adapted Modified Jadad Questionnaire.

Findings

Food fortification was associated with increased calorie intake in eight studies, increased protein intake in five studies, and increased body weight in three studies. However, studies were limited by lack of rigor in methodology and small sample sizes.

Originality/value

Food fortification may improve calorie and protein intake, but results are limited by study weaknesses. Additionally, it is unclear whether improved intake results in improved clinical outcomes.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 25 February 2021

Qian Sun, Xiaoyun Li and Dil Bahadur Rahut

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of urbanicity on rural–urban migrants' dietary diversity and nutrition intake and whether its effect differs across…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of urbanicity on rural–urban migrants' dietary diversity and nutrition intake and whether its effect differs across various urban environments of migrants.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the individual- and time-invariant fixed effects (two-way FE) model and five-year panel data from the China Health and Nutrition Survey (CHNS), this paper estimates a linear and nonlinear relationship between urbanicity and nutrition. The paper also explores the spatial heterogeneity between rural–urban migrants and rural–suburban migrants. Dietary diversity, total energy intake and the shares of energy obtained from protein and fat, respectively, are used to measure rural–urban migrants' nutrition on both quality and quantity aspects.

Findings

The study shows that rural–urban migrants have experienced access to more diverse, convenient and prepared foods, and the food variety consumed is positively associated with community urbanicity. Energy intake is positively and significantly affected by community urbanicity, and it also varies with per capita household income. The obvious inverse U-shaped relationship reveals that improving community urbanicity promotes an increase in the shares of energy obtained from protein and fat at a decreasing rate, until reaching the urbanicity index threshold of 66.69 and 54.26, respectively.

Originality/value

This paper focuses on the nutritional status of rural–urban migrants, an important pillar for China's development, which is often neglected in the research. It examines the urbanicity and the nutrition of migrants in China, which provides a new perspective to understand the dietary and nutritional intake among migrants in the economic and social development. Moreover, the urbanicity index performs better at measuring urban feathers rather than the traditional rural/urban dichotomous classification.

Details

China Agricultural Economic Review, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-137X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 February 2017

Elina Maseta, T.C. Mosha, Cornelio Nyaruhucha and Henry Laswai

Child undernutrition is a persistent problem in Africa, especially in areas where the poor largely depend on starchy staples with limited access to diverse diets. The…

Abstract

Purpose

Child undernutrition is a persistent problem in Africa, especially in areas where the poor largely depend on starchy staples with limited access to diverse diets. The purpose of this study was to determine the protein quality, growth and rehabilitating potential of composite foods made from quality protein maize.

Design/methodology/approach

Four composite diets were prepared from quality protein maize, namely quality protein maize-soybeans; quality protein maize-soybeans-cowpeas; quality protein maize-soybeans-common beans and quality protein maize alone. A fifth diet was prepared from common maize alone. The control diet (Chesta®) was made from maize, soybeans, fish, bone and blood meal. The formulations were made to meet the greatest amino acid score and the desired amount of energy and fat according to the FAO/WHO (1985) recommendation for pre-school children. Albino rats were used in evaluating the protein quality of the formulations.

Findings

The food intake was significantly different (p < 0.05) among diets; with a trend of intake decreasing from quality protein maize-based to conventional maize alone diets (apart from the control diet). Protein efficiency ratio and net protein ratio varied significantly (p < 0.05) across the experimental diets. Protein digestibility-corrected amino acid score (PDCAAS) was 80 per cent (quality protein maize-soybeans-cowpeas), 87 per cent (quality protein maize-soybeans), 103 per cent (common maize alone), 98 per cent (quality protein maize), 80 per cent (quality protein maize-soybeans-common beans) and 53 per cent (control).

Research limitations/implications

Two diets, namely quality protein maize-soybeans-common beans and quality protein maize-soybeans-cowpeas, showed the greatest potential to support growth and rehabilitation of undernourished rats. Human trial is proposed to validate the findings.

Originality/value

Despite adoption of quality protein maize in several parts of the country, there are no studies that have been done to determine the potential of quality protein maize to support optimal growth and rehabilitation of undernourished children. The objective of this study was, therefore, to evaluate the protein quality, growth and rehabilitating potential of composite foods made from quality protein maize.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 47 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 September 2022

Hadith Tangestani, Maryam Ghaseminasab-Parizi, Seyed Mohammad Mazloomi, Mesbah Shams, Afsane Ahmadi and Mohammad Fararouei

Osteoporosis is increasingly affecting the young female adults of the Iranian population. The role of nutrition and physical activity on bone mineral content (BMC) and…

Abstract

Purpose

Osteoporosis is increasingly affecting the young female adults of the Iranian population. The role of nutrition and physical activity on bone mineral content (BMC) and bone mineral density (BMD) in young female students has not been fully examined. This study aims to assess the dietary intake of several nutrients, such as calcium, phosphorus and protein; serum concentrations of vitamin D; and physical activity and their relationship with BMC and BMD in young female students.

Design/methodology/approach

Three-day dietary intakes of 67 female students were measured via duplicate portion sampling (DPS) method. Calcium and phosphorus content of the food samples were determined using atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Protein intake was determined by Kjeldahl method. Serum 25(OH) D concentrations were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Lumbar spine and femoral neck BMD were measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA).

Findings

The mean ±SD dietary intake of protein, calcium and phosphorus was 58.8 ± 16.9 g/day, 388 ± 135 mg/day and 1884 ± 682 mg/day, respectively. Significant positive correlation was found between serum vitamin 25(OH) D concentrations and BMC of lumbar spine (r = 0.28, p = 0.016) and BMD of femoral neck (r = 0.29, p = 0.016). Moreover, the authors observed a significant positive correlation between physical activity and femoral neck BMC (r = 0.26, p = 0.03) and BMD (r = 0.28, p = 0.02). This study found no significant associations between dietary intakes of protein, calcium and phosphorus and bone density measurements.

Originality/value

In this study, the authors measured the dietary intake of protein, calcium and phosphorus using DPS method. This study highlights the role of physical activity and serum vitamin 25(OH) D concentrations in female students’ bone health.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 May 2015

Li Zhou and Calum G. Turvey

– The purpose of this paper is to investigate the linkages between climate change, income dynamics and nutrition intake in rural China.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the linkages between climate change, income dynamics and nutrition intake in rural China.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a system of simultaneous equations in a three-stage least squares model instrumented with carbohydrates, fats, proteins and farm income the authors found generally that the greatest impact on nutrition would be from changes in temperature.

Findings

The authors do not find that modest changes in precipitation affect nutrient intake, but extreme events such as drought do. Furthermore, the authors found a strong income effect and this income effect is opposite the heating effect. This may suggest that large swings in nutrient intake brought about by climate change may be countermanded by equivalent increases in income. The authors also found that in terms of general measures of elasticity that market effects, especially in the price of meats, can impact carbohydrate, fat and protein intake as much as global warming.

Originality/value

The authors believe that three aspects of this manuscript will make it interesting. First, in the short term, poorer households would be the most vulnerable and sensitive to climate change. However, in the long term, all households in rural China appear able to deal with changing climatic conditions through adaptation. Second, the authors do not find evidences to prove the existence of a poverty nutrition trap in rural China. Third, the results also indicate that, the nutrition intake of households in rural China is more prone to gradual changes, rather than extreme events.

Details

China Agricultural Economic Review, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-137X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 May 2012

Muhammad Muzaffar Ali Khan Khattak and Zenub Akram

The purpose of this paper is to compare the nutritional status of two socio‐economic classes, i.e. upper and middle class females, using different approaches apart from…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to compare the nutritional status of two socio‐economic classes, i.e. upper and middle class females, using different approaches apart from body mass index (BMI).

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 50 houses were randomly selected from a military officer colony, 25 in each social class on the basis of rank of the retired military officers. From each house a female in between the age range of 30‐50 years was selected and interviewed.

Findings

On overall basis, i.e. socio‐economic class, age and activity level, the respondents were having increase over reference protein and carbohydrate, while decrease over reference fat intake. The respondents were also having lower calcium and iron intakes by 31‐34 per cent and 39‐44 per cent, respectively. The vitamin A intake was also lower by 22‐43 per cent. These data suggest that there are faulty food habits and unnecessary restrictions among the females on energy and nutrients intakes in both classes.

Research limitations/implications

This research will have significant effect on the readers and will not only warn about the food habit but will also provide information on the misconceptions about dietary intakes and therefore, the energy and nutrients consumptions. Generally, the privileged classes of the society hold the misconceptions about healthy food habits. Furthermore, this study was conducted on free‐living individuals and the data reported are based on confronted questionnaire. Therefore, in such data there are chances of bias because of over‐ or under‐estimation. The sample size was small, which might have affected the results.

Practical implications

Improved life style and healthy eating is of great concern in the learned societies, since the healthy outcome solely depends on these two factors. This paper provides baseline data on two privileged classes, which may be useful in planning of studies and recommendation for social classes.

Social implications

This could be useful information and could be used in healthy lifestyle and energy and nutrients intakes when studies are to be planned on socioeconomic status.

Originality/value

This research takes into consideration the effect of social class on energy and nutrients intake in the two privileged socioeconomic classes in a military officer colony.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 42 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 February 2018

João Pedro Marques Lima, Sofia A. Costa and Ada Rocha

Excessive high caloric and nutritional intake has been associated with weight gain which is linked to an increased prevalence of cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes…

Abstract

Purpose

Excessive high caloric and nutritional intake has been associated with weight gain which is linked to an increased prevalence of cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes and several types of cancers. The purpose of this paper is to characterize the nutritional intake pattern of the population in terms of energy, macro and micronutrients.

Design/methodology/approach

There were assessed 513 workers of the University of Porto (UP) randomly selected. The Food Processor Plus was used to convert foods into nutrients and, to assess nutritional intake adequacy. Data were compared to Dietary Reference Intakes and with recommended ranges by the World Health Organization.

Findings

The intake of most individuals was above recommendations for protein, carbohydrates and sodium. The average of energy intake observed in UP employees was lower than data available for Portuguese general population. The protein, carbohydrates, total fat and water intake, cholesterol, saturated, monounsaturated, polyunsaturated fatty acids and sodium intake were found to be significantly higher for men. Significant differences were found for vitamin D and calcium between age ranges; Carbohydrates, sugar, monounsaturated fatty acids, cholesterol, water and vitamin K was significantly different between teachers and non-teachers.

Originality/value

According to nutritional intake analysis, food consumption of this population was unbalanced, attending to high protein, carbohydrates and sodium intake.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 120 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 2000