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1 – 10 of 381
Article
Publication date: 15 February 2008

A.G. Bache

The present field of prosthetics/orthotics is an erratic agglomerate of vague guidelines, skills and knowledge. The author conceived prosthotology to clarify, expand and…

502

Abstract

Purpose

The present field of prosthetics/orthotics is an erratic agglomerate of vague guidelines, skills and knowledge. The author conceived prosthotology to clarify, expand and enlighten prosthetics/orthotics into a science with a solid foundation and clear framework. This paper seeks to present itself as an introduction to the field and its relationship with cybernetics and systems.

Design/methodology/approach

Prosthotology achieves this by disregarding the established barriers between the human body, mind and environment. This traditional scheme is replaced by focusing on goals and goal systems instead. A goal system consists of a goal former and a goal achiever. When a goal achiever cannot achieve a goal, it can be amended. If a goal achiever cannot initialise, a prosthesis may provide amendment. If a goal achiever cannot propagate, an orthosis may provide amendment.

Findings

This perspective enables one to focus on a person's needs, what exactly is inhibiting these needs, and how best to permit the needs to be granted. It does not assume that, in order to achieve a goal, only the human body can be used.

Practical implications

Prosthotology provides direction and advancement for prosthetics and orthotics. It also enhances integration of prosthetics and orthotics with other engineering disciplines.

Originality/value

So far one has only scratched the surface of the potential of prosthetics and orthotics, using prosthotology, this potential is obvious and a step closer.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 37 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 March 2010

Richard Bibb, Dominic Eggbeer and Peter Evans

Maxillofacial prosthetics is faced with increasing patient numbers and cost constraints leading to the need to explore whether computer‐aided techniques can increase…

1699

Abstract

Purpose

Maxillofacial prosthetics is faced with increasing patient numbers and cost constraints leading to the need to explore whether computer‐aided techniques can increase efficiency. This need is addressed through a four‐year research project that identified quality, economic, technological and clinical implications of the application of digital technologies in maxillofacial prosthetics. The purpose of this paper is to address the aspects of this research that related to the application of rapid prototyping (RP).

Design/methodology/approach

An action research approach is taken, utilising multiple case studies to evaluate the current capabilities of digital technologies in the preparation, design and manufacture of maxillofacial prostheses.

Findings

The research indicates where RP has demonstrated potential clinical application and where further technical developments are required. The paper provides a technical specification towards which RP manufacturers can direct developments that would meet the needs of maxillofacial prosthetists.

Originality/value

Whilst research studies have explored digital technologies in maxillofacial prosthetics, they have relied on individual studies applying a single RP technology to one particular aspect of a prosthesis. Consequently, conclusions on the wider implications have not been possible. This research explored the application of digital technologies to every aspect of the design and manufacture of a series of maxillofacial prostheses. Unlike previous research, the cases described here addressed the application of RP to the direct manufacture of substructures, retention components and texture. This research analyses prosthetic requirements to ascertain target technical specifications towards which RP processes should be developed.

Details

Rapid Prototyping Journal, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2546

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 August 2020

Chunchun Wang

The purpose of this paper is to examine the transformations of prosthetic practices in China, as well as the daily experiences and dilemmas arising from the everchanging…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the transformations of prosthetic practices in China, as well as the daily experiences and dilemmas arising from the everchanging practices since 1949. On the basis of materials, this paper explores an everyday perspective to review the history of technology.

Design/methodology/approach

Ethnography was collected with the application of participant observations, informal interviews and in-depth interviews during a 13-months study at a rehabilitation center in Chengdu, China. The literature on prosthetic manufacturing was also reviewed for this paper.

Findings

China's prosthetic technology seems to evolve from traditional to modern. However, this progressive narrative – innovation-based timeline (Edgerton, 2006, xi) – has been challenged by daily practices. Due to institutional pressures, prosthetists are in a dilemma of selectively using their knowledge to create one kind of device for all prosthesis users with a certain kind of disability, thereby regulating the physical and social experiences of prosthesis users. Besides, prosthesis users are accustomed to prostheses made with old techniques, and must correct themselves from old experiences to the daily practices recognized by the selected techniques.

Originality/value

This paper provides a cross-cultural case to reexamine Edgerton's criticism of the progressive and orderly innovation-centric technological narrative. More importantly, it reviews the history and practices of China's prosthetics from daily experiences rather than Edgerton's concentration on technology; therefore, it provides an everyday perspective for future research on technological transformations.

Details

Asian Education and Development Studies, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-3162

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 August 2009

Robert Bogue

The purpose of this paper is to review recent developments in exoskeletons and robotic prosthetics.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review recent developments in exoskeletons and robotic prosthetics.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper first describes a number of recently developed exoskeletons for military, civil and medical applications. It then discusses robotic prosthetics and concludes with a brief consideration of progress in brain‐computer interface (BCI) technology.

Findings

Robotic exoskeletons are the topic of a major research effort, much being funded by the US military, and aims to impart superhuman strength to the wearer. Japanese research is also well advanced and concerns a range of non‐military applications, including strength enhancement and medical rehabilitation. Some products have recently been commercialised. There has also been significant progress in the development of robotic prosthetic limbs, a topic which is also attracting support from the US military. A key aim is the development of thought‐controlled prosthetics which will arise from advances in BCI technology.

Originality/value

This paper provides a detailed review of the latest developments in exoskeletons and robotic prosthetics.

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 36 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 May 2011

Robert Bogue

This paper aims to review of the use of robots in two healthcare applications: surgery and prosthetics.

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to review of the use of robots in two healthcare applications: surgery and prosthetics.

Design/methodology/approach

Following a brief introduction, this paper first considers robotic surgery and discusses a selection of commercial products, applications and recent technological advances. It then considers recent developments in robotic prosthetics.

Findings

It is shown that surgical robots are being employed in an ever‐growing range of clinical procedures. Systems employing tactile feedback are under development. Improved robotic prosthetics are the topic of a major research effort and recent developments include hands and grippers, walking aids and novel control techniques, including thought‐activated systems which exploit advances in brain‐computer interface technology.

Originality/value

This paper provides details of recent developments and applications of robotic surgery and prosthetics.

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 38 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 August 2022

Tom Bieling, Melike Şahinol, Robert Stock and Anna–Lena Wiechern

This contribution shows perspectives of experts from different disciplines and professional backgrounds in order to elaborate on maker approaches such as do-it-yourself…

Abstract

Purpose

This contribution shows perspectives of experts from different disciplines and professional backgrounds in order to elaborate on maker approaches such as do-it-yourself prosthetics and collaborative tools. As a result, aspects of open source practices related to medical and assistive technologies will be critically reflected upon. In addition, implications of heterogeneous interests, economic implications and everyday achievements of social material assemblages produced through participatory design research are discussed.

Design/methodology/approach

In order to address an interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary perspective on the relationships between body (differences) and technology, it is necessary to bring together studies from both Science and Technology Studies (STS) and crip technoscience as well as approaches from participatory design research and practice. This challenge was addressed by a roundtable organized as part of the third network meeting of the Dis/Ability and Digital Media Research Network on 16 September 2020.

Findings

Against the backdrop of “crip technoscience” DIY and collaborative open source practices are not only understood as valuable alternatives to standardized medical prosthetics and assistive devices. These bottom-up approaches which draw from the expert knowledge of disabled users (Hamraie and Fritsch, 2019) also facilitate devices that defy categories such as “prosthetic” or “medical aid” not only aesthetically but semantically, too.

Originality/value

The Network Dis/Abilities and Digital Media intends to integrate media and technology studies with disability studies on a theoretical level. This round table discussion delivers proof of how – on the practical level – technology and dis/ability need to be thought of as relational and co-constitutive (Mills and Sterne, 2017).

Details

Journal of Enabling Technologies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-6263

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 October 2018

Mukul Ramola, Vinod Yadav and Rakesh Jain

The purpose of this paper is to discuss different 3D printing techniques and also illustrate the issues related to 3D printing and cost-effectiveness in the near future.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss different 3D printing techniques and also illustrate the issues related to 3D printing and cost-effectiveness in the near future.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic literature review methodology is adopted for this review paper. 3D printing is in the initial phase of implementation in healthcare; therefore, a study of 70 research papers is done, which discusses the research trends of 3D printing in healthcare sector from 2007 to mid-2018.

Findings

Though additive manufacturing has a vast application, it has not been used to its full potential. Therefore, more research is required in that direction. It is revealed from the review that only a few researchers have explored issues related to cost, which can clearly show cost-effectiveness of adopting 3D printing.

Originality/value

This paper helps in understanding the different 3D printing techniques and their application in the healthcare. It also proposed some methods which can be applied in delivering customized pharmaceuticals to the customer and to improve surgery.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 October 2016

Sean Peel, Dominic Eggbeer, Adrian Sugar and Peter Llewelyn Evans

Post-traumatic zygomatic osteotomy, fracture reduction, and orbital floor reconstruction pose many challenges for achieving a predictable, accurate, safe, and…

Abstract

Purpose

Post-traumatic zygomatic osteotomy, fracture reduction, and orbital floor reconstruction pose many challenges for achieving a predictable, accurate, safe, and aesthetically pleasing result. This paper aims to describe the successful application of computer-aided design (CAD) and additive manufacturing (AM) to every stage of the process – from planning to surgery.

Design/methodology/approach

A multi-disciplinary team was used – comprising surgeons, prosthetists, technicians, and designers. The patient’s computed tomography scan data were segmented for bone and exported to a CAD software package. Medical models were fabricated using AM; for diagnosis, patient communication, and device verification. The surgical approach was modelled in the virtual environment and a custom surgical cutting guide, custom bone-repositioning guide, custom zygomatic implant, and custom orbital floor implant were each designed, prototyped, iterated, and validated using polymer AM prior to final fabrication using metal AM.

Findings

Post-operative clinical outcomes were as planned. The patient’s facial symmetry was improved, and their inability to fully close their eyelid was corrected. The length of the operation was reduced relative to the surgical team’s previous experiences. Post-operative scan analysis indicated a maximum deviation from the planned location for the largest piece of mobilised bone of 3.65 mm. As a result, the orbital floor implant which was fixed to this bone demonstrated a maximum deviation of 4.44 mm from the plan.

Originality/value

This represents the first application of CAD and AM to every stage of the process for this procedure – from diagnosis, to planning, and to surgery.

Details

Rapid Prototyping Journal, vol. 22 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2546

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 April 2020

Sara M. Martins, Fernando A.F. Ferreira, João J. M. Ferreira and Carla S.E. Marques

The prosthodontics sector is facing major challenges because of scientific and technological advances that imply a clearer definition of lines of action and decision…

502

Abstract

Purpose

The prosthodontics sector is facing major challenges because of scientific and technological advances that imply a clearer definition of lines of action and decision making processes. Measuring quality of service in this sector is a complex decision problem since the perceptions of three main players need to be considered: patients, dentists and dental technicians. This study sought to develop an artificial-intelligence-based (AI-based) method for assessing service quality in the dental prosthesis sector.

Design/methodology/approach

Using strategic options development and analysis (SODA), which is grounded on cognitive mapping, and the measuring attractiveness by a categorical based evaluation technique (MACBETH), a constructivist decision support system was designed to facilitate the assessment of service quality in the dental prosthesis sector. The system was tested, and the results were validated both by the members of an expert panel and by the vice-president of the Portuguese association of dental prosthesis technicians.

Findings

The methodological process developed in this study is extremely versatile and its practical application facilitated the development of an empirically robust evaluation model in this study context. Specifically, the profile analyses carried out in actual clinics allowed the cases in which improvements are needed to be identified.

Originality/value

Although already applied in the fields of AI and decision making, no prior work reporting the use of SODA and MACBETH for assessing service quality in the prosthodontics sector has been found.

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2002

Francis E.H. Tay, M.A. Manna and L.X. Liu

As an application of the computer aided design and computer aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) technology in prosthetics, computer aided socket design and computer aided socket…

1979

Abstract

As an application of the computer aided design and computer aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) technology in prosthetics, computer aided socket design and computer aided socket manufacturing (CASD/CASM) is becoming an active field in the prosthetics research. In this paper, a CASD/CASM method for prosthetic socket fabrication is described in detail. This is different from other fabrication methods in its novel combination of the CAD/CAM technology with fused deposition modeling (FDM) technology. Prosthetic sockets for volunteer amputees have been designed and fabricated in a FDM machine. In order to test the fabrication result, a final product was used to perform a clinical trial and some results are reported. In addition, the deficiency of the long fabrication time is addressed and some feasible solutions are discussed.

Details

Rapid Prototyping Journal, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2546

Keywords

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