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1 – 10 of over 3000
Article
Publication date: 28 March 2022

Georg-Friedrich Göhler, Judith Hattke and Markus Göbel

This paper aims to determine whether prosocial motivation acts as a mediator between the individual motivation types of self-determination theory and knowledge sharing.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to determine whether prosocial motivation acts as a mediator between the individual motivation types of self-determination theory and knowledge sharing.

Design/methodology/approach

A partial least squares structural equation model (PLS-SEM) based on data collection (N = 303) ) was calculated, using “Smart PLS 3” software.

Findings

In respect of the influence of individual motivation types on knowledge sharing, it was found that prosocial motivation provides indirect mediation for external motivation and complementary mediation for introjected motivation, whereas it has no mediation effect on intrinsic and identified motivation.

Research limitations/implications

Future research should consider the use of prosocial motivation as a mediator to reveal indirect effects that, otherwise, are at risk of remaining hidden.

Practical implications

To foster knowledge sharing within organizations, measures should be taken to increase external, introjected and prosocial motivation, as it was found that these types of motivation have a significant positive impact on knowledge sharing.

Originality/value

The current unanswered question – whether or not prosocial motivation acts as a mediator between the motivation types of self-determination theory and knowledge sharing – is examined, thereby providing insights into the hitherto largely unexplored role of prosocial motivation in knowledge-sharing models.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 June 2020

Chuanpeng Yu, Baosheng Ye and Shenghui Ma

The purpose of this study is to investigate how individuals' prosocial motivation affects their social entrepreneurship intentions (SEI) through the mediating effect of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate how individuals' prosocial motivation affects their social entrepreneurship intentions (SEI) through the mediating effect of creativity and the moderating effect of family-to-work support.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire survey was conducted in the Pearl River Delta region in Guangdong, China, and data were collected from 318 respondents who had rich social work experience. To test the hypotheses, a hierarchical linear regression analysis was conducted using SPSS 24.0 software.

Findings

Results offer empirical support for the hypotheses that creativity in social work plays a full mediating role in the relationship between individuals' prosocial motivation and SEI, and family-to-work support plays a positive moderating role in the relationship between creativity in social work and SEI.

Research limitations/implications

This study shows the importance of prosocial motivation, creativity in social work and family support in driving individuals' social entrepreneurship intentions and behaviours. Future research needs to further examine how the dynamic relationships between these factors unfold over time, as well as consider the effect of other motivational factors on creativity and SEI.

Practical implications

This study suggests that the cultivation of individual prosocial motivation is crucial and requires the efforts of family, school and society. Relevant organisations should encourage individuals to incorporate creative thinking into their work, as well as offer training opportunities. In addition, social entrepreneurs should also strengthen communication with their families and strive to gain their understanding and support.

Originality/value

The findings of this study extend existing views on the relationship between individuals' motivation and entrepreneurship intentions in the social entrepreneurship research field by focusing on the perspective of prosocial motivation. In particular, this study reveals the complex process of how prosocial motivation promotes SEI by identifying the role of creativity and family-to-work support, which has rarely been explored in the extant literature.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 59 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 August 2019

Katja Babič, Matej Černe, Catherine E. Connelly, Anders Dysvik and Miha Škerlavaj

Although organizations expect employees to share knowledge with each other, knowledge hiding has been documented among coworker dyads. This paper aims to draw on social…

2129

Abstract

Purpose

Although organizations expect employees to share knowledge with each other, knowledge hiding has been documented among coworker dyads. This paper aims to draw on social exchange theory to examine if and why knowledge hiding also occurs in teams.

Design/methodology/approach

Two studies, using experimental (115 student participants on 29 teams) and field (309 employees on 92 teams) data, explore the influence of leader-member exchange (LMX) on knowledge hiding in teams, as well as the moderating role of collective (team-level) prosocial motivation.

Findings

The results of experimental Study 1 showed that collective prosocial motivation and LMX reduce knowledge hiding in teams. Field Study 2 further examined LMX, through its distinctive economic and social facets, and revealed the interaction effect of team prosocial motivation and social LMX on knowledge hiding.

Originality/value

This study complements existing research on knowledge hiding by focusing specifically on the incidence of this phenomenon among members of the same team. This paper presents a multi-level model that explores collective prosocial motivation as a cross-level predictor of knowledge hiding in teams, and examines economic LMX and social LMX as two facets of LMX.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 23 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 February 2022

Danping Shao and Yun Peng

Based on the role theory and prosocial motivation literature, this research aims to explore the bright and dark side of socially responsible human resource management…

Abstract

Purpose

Based on the role theory and prosocial motivation literature, this research aims to explore the bright and dark side of socially responsible human resource management (SRHRM) on hotel employees' outcomes through the mediation of role conflict. Besides, this study examines the moderating effect of prosocial motivation between role conflict and volunteering and organizational citizenship behavior (OCB).

Design/methodology/approach

The authors collected 326 employee-supervisor dyads data in two waves from 12 hotels in the province of Wuhan, China. Besides, structural equation modeling (SEM) analysis was adopted to test the hypothesized model.

Findings

As expected, the result shows that SRHRM can increase employees' volunteering and decrease their OCB through the mediation of the role conflict. Further, prosocial motivation strengthens the linkage between role conflict and volunteering, but not the relationship between role conflict and OCB.

Practical implications

This result enables hotel managers to adopt SRHRM as a useful tool of carrying out suitable corporate social responsibility (CSR) activities. Additionally, this study highlights the vital role of employee in successful CSR implementation.

Originality/value

Although the hotel industry contributes a lot to global economic development, CSR research specifically focused on hotel industry has been unexplored. Therefore, this research brings SRHRM into hotel industry and establishes a model specifying both the bright side and dark side effect of SRHRM in the hotel industry.

Details

Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Insights, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9792

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 December 2019

Waheed Ali Umrani, Imdad Ali Siyal, Umair Ahmed, Ghulam Ali Arain, Hassan Sayed and Sumera Umrani

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the perceptions of faculty members about the influence of family motivation on their self-efficacy and organizational…

1425

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the perceptions of faculty members about the influence of family motivation on their self-efficacy and organizational citizenship behavior-individual (OCBI).

Design/methodology/approach

The proposed model was tested on a sample of 353 faculty members from different public and private universities of Pakistan. Partial least squares structural equation modeling was used to analyze data.

Findings

Surprisingly, results reveal that family motivation was not positively related to faculty members’ OCBI; instead, this relationship is fully mediated by self-efficacy. The findings suggest that it is employees’ self-efficacy belief through which their family motivation translates to their increased OCBI. This study also finds that supporting the family is a powerful source of motivation to work, offering meaningful practical and theoretical implications for policy-makers, leaders, managers and researchers on the new dynamics of work and family engagements.

Originality/value

The study contributes to human resource management (HRM) and organizational behavior (OB) literatures by providing some useful practical implications for managers and HRM and OB consultants who are interested in understanding the underlying psychological mechanisms (i.e. self-efficacy) through which employees’ family motivation results in the increased OCBI.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 49 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 August 2017

Colin B. Gabler, Raj Agnihotri and Omar S. Itani

The purpose of this paper is to investigate guilt proneness as a prosocial salesperson trait and its impact on outcomes important to the firm, the customer as well as the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate guilt proneness as a prosocial salesperson trait and its impact on outcomes important to the firm, the customer as well as the salesperson. Specifically, the authors look at how this variable relates to job effort and the indirect effects on customer satisfaction. The corollary purpose is to uncover how managers influence these constructs through positive outcome feedback.

Design/methodology/approach

Prosocial motivation theory grounds the conceptual model which the authors test through survey implementation. The final sample consisted of 129 business-to-business (B2B) salespeople working across multiple industries in India. Latent moderated structural equation modeling was utilized to test the proposed model.

Findings

The results suggest that guilt proneness positively influences the likelihood that a salesperson adopts a relational orientation, which has a direct effect on individual effort and an indirect effect on customer satisfaction. Supervisors have the ability to amplify this effort through positive outcome feedback, but only when relational orientation is low. Their support had no effect on salespeople with a high relational orientation.

Originality/value

The study is unique in that it combines an overlooked prosocial trait with a B2B Indian dataset. We provide value for firms because our results show that guilt-prone salespeople put more effort into their job – ”something universally desirable among sales managers” – through the development of a relational orientation. The authors also give practical implications on how to support salespeople given their level of relational orientation.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 32 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 March 2018

Hussain Tariq and Donghong Ding

Synthesizing theories of prosocial motivation and action identification, the purpose of this paper is to test several hypotheses associating abusive supervisory behavior…

2711

Abstract

Purpose

Synthesizing theories of prosocial motivation and action identification, the purpose of this paper is to test several hypotheses associating abusive supervisory behavior with employees’ work behaviors via intervening variables, i.e., intrinsic motivation and family motivation.

Design/methodology/approach

The two-study examination of outcomes of abusive supervision stands in contrast to prior research, which has primarily focused on family motivation that influences supervisor-subordinate relationship. A lagged survey study at a Fortune 500 company and an experience sampling study at multi-organizations located in Anhui province of People’s Republic of China (PRC) support the moderated-mediation motivational model.

Findings

In the first study, designed as a lagged survey study, the authors found that abusive supervision is negatively associated with employees’ job performance and positively associated with employees’ turnover intentions. As anticipated, the results also found that family motivation moderates the direct relationship between abusive supervision and employees’ work behaviors. Furthermore, these results were then replicated and expanded in an experience sampling study. Consistent with the predictions, the authors found that intrinsic motivation acts as a mediator between abusive supervision and employees’ work behaviors and family motivation has the capacity to compensate for the absence of intrinsic motivation.

Research limitations/implications

Although the paper contributes to leadership and motivation literature, there are several noteworthy limitations to be discussed in the future. The subjective measurement, the validity of abusive supervision in the Chinese context and generalizing of the study in western countries are the key limitations of the study. Moreover, the authors measure abusive supervision only on high/low frequency based rather than high/low intensity. Hence, there is a possibility that intensity and frequency have dissimilar effects.

Originality/value

The study with meaningful implications on motivation and leadership research concludes that family as a powerful source of motivation encourages subordinates’ job performance and discourages employees’ turnover intentions at the workplace, even under abusive supervision.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 47 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 October 2019

John Nadeau, Leslie Wardley and Alexander Dorohoi

The purpose of this paper is to explore the understudied topic of sustainability as a factor in the Canadian residential real estate purchase decision using the unique…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the understudied topic of sustainability as a factor in the Canadian residential real estate purchase decision using the unique lens of justice motivation theory.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a qualitative approach, the study draws on transcripts from 14 interviews with realtors and residential buyers in three different Ontario cities. This paper adopts an exploratory perspective to investigate justice-based motivations related to sustainability in the real estate decision process.

Findings

The research finds that the three requirements of justice motivation are satisfied in the context of a broad understanding of sustainability that includes social, economic and environmental dimensions. The residential real estate decision offers opportunities for sellers to appeal to those motivated by justice.

Practical implications

Policymakers should consider ways of easing these barriers for those consumers who a financially unable to satisfy their justice motivation when purchasing a home as well as bolstering regulatory enforcement. Sellers should clearly articulate functional explanations of features as well as benefits to enhance the cognitive processing of the sustainable home as a choice alternative.

Originality/value

This paper makes a unique contribution by arguing that the social psychology theory of justice motivation helps explain the role of sustainability in the residential real estate purchase decision-making process.

Details

International Journal of Housing Markets and Analysis, vol. 13 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8270

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2022

Zhi Yang, Hui Lu and Jiaxin Bao

Makerspaces, which serve as fertile grounds for makers' innovation activities, are rapidly increasing in emerging markets to help unleash a massive wave of bottom-up…

Abstract

Purpose

Makerspaces, which serve as fertile grounds for makers' innovation activities, are rapidly increasing in emerging markets to help unleash a massive wave of bottom-up innovation and encourage broader participation in entrepreneurial activities. Makers' motivations to innovate are key antecedents of their subsequent innovative behavior. The paper aims to investigate the impact of makers' innovation motivations (both economic and social motivations) on their exploration and exploitation activities in makerspaces and the moderating role of the makerspace climate for innovation.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was conducted for 139 individual makers from five makerspaces in China to test the research hypotheses.

Findings

Economic motivation positively affected the degree of exploitative innovation and was negatively related to the degree of exploratory innovation. In contrast, social motivation negatively affected the degree of exploitative innovation and was positively related to the degree of exploratory innovation. The makerspace climate for innovation strengthened the relationship between social motivation and exploratory innovation and exacerbated the negative effect of economic motivation on exploration.

Practical implications

The results offer managers a better understanding of how makers' motivation to participate in makerspaces affects their innovative behavior. Such information can guide makerspaces in designing their incentive policies and recruiting makers in line with their values to amplify makers' creative potential.

Originality/value

The empirical results reveal the impacts of economic and social motivations on makers' exploration and exploitation activities in makerspaces. They thus provide new insights into how different motivations give rise to different innovative behaviors and imply how makers' innovation activities can be managed effectively.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 December 2018

David Gligor, Siddik Bozkurt, Ivan Russo and Ayman Omar

Although supply chain scholars have acknowledged the fundamental disruptive changes experienced by today’s supply chains and the ensuing novelty of the research problems…

2915

Abstract

Purpose

Although supply chain scholars have acknowledged the fundamental disruptive changes experienced by today’s supply chains and the ensuing novelty of the research problems worthy of investigation, they have primarily relied on a limited number of theories to help explain the phenomena of interest. The purpose of this paper is to use a systematic literature review to address this gap and propose additional theories that supply chain researchers can use to help address novel supply chain phenomena, such as those caused by technological disruptions.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use a systematic literature review to examine the studies published over the last 10 years in six of the top supply chain management journals (411 articles) and six of the top marketing and management journals (1,214 articles).

Findings

First, the findings show that 15 theories have been relied upon by over 95 per cent of the studies within supply chain management that use formal theories. Second, the authors identify the most frequently used theories within marketing and management (217 theories). Third, as space limitations make it impossible to offer a rich description of each of the 217 theories, the authors identify 30 theories that they considered to be the most salient to supply chain research and suggest areas where supply chain scholars can apply these theoretical lenses.

Originality/value

The research effort allowed the authors to map the current use of theories within the field to gain a better understanding of what other theories could augment the body of theories used within supply chain management. Thus, the current study is a “one stop shop” that supply chain scholars can consult when in a quandary about what theoretical lens to utilize.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 3000