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Article
Publication date: 14 March 2016

Byoung Kwon Choi and Hyoung Koo Moon

Building on trait activation theory, theory of other orientation, and self-perception theory, the purpose of this paper is to examine how employees’ perceptions of helping…

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1729

Abstract

Purpose

Building on trait activation theory, theory of other orientation, and self-perception theory, the purpose of this paper is to examine how employees’ perceptions of helping efficacy and instrumentality influence the relationship between their prosocial motive and helping behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

Data from 304 supervisor-subordinate dyads in South Korea were analyzed. Hypotheses were tested using hierarchical multiple regression.

Findings

The results show that prosocial motive had a stronger positive influence on helping behavior among employees with high levels of helping efficacy. However, contrary to our expectation, prosocial motive was more positively related to helping behavior when employees had high levels of helping instrumentality.

Practical implications

Organizations need to present employees with effective, standardized work procedures to make them feel efficacy in helping others. It is also necessary for organizations to consider helping behavior an important factor in performance evaluation and to signify to employees that helping behavior will be rewarded.

Social implications

Helping behavior is critical for the effectiveness of both organizations and society at large; voluntarily helping people can enhance various kinds of performance at the societal level and can contribute to people’s welfare. Thus, it is necessary to teach people how to help others and to recognize helping behavior.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the understanding of when the influence of prosocial motive on helping is more strongly activated by incorporating employees’ perceptions of the contexts in which helping behavior operates – efficacy and instrumentality.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Book part
Publication date: 23 September 2009

Kyle Irwin

Why do strangers in collectivist societies act prosocially? Previous work indicates that generalized trust (trust in strangers) is necessary for prosocial behavior;…

Abstract

Why do strangers in collectivist societies act prosocially? Previous work indicates that generalized trust (trust in strangers) is necessary for prosocial behavior; however, generalized trust exists at low levels in collectivist societies. Researchers have also argued that without trust among strangers, social order is threatened. Yet, collectivist societies are not characterized by social disorder; therefore, individuals must be acting prosocially. Without generalized trust, how is this possible? In this work I argue that institutional trust (a belief that institutions induce others to act in a trustworthy manner) is responsible for prosociality in collectivist societies, not generalized trust. Does a similar relationship hold in individualist societies? Although some evidence suggests that prosocial behavior is predicated by generalized trust, other evidence indicates that the stronger predictor is institutional trust. All arguments are tested with data from the World Values Survey (WVS) with data from 14 countries. Results from regression analyses are reported. The chapter concludes with implications and directions for future work.

Details

Altruism and Prosocial Behavior in Groups
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-573-0

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Article
Publication date: 25 August 2021

Baobao Song

Public relations practitioners worldwide are attempting to enhance the overall organization–stakeholder relationships by applying strategic communication techniques and…

Abstract

Purpose

Public relations practitioners worldwide are attempting to enhance the overall organization–stakeholder relationships by applying strategic communication techniques and skills to corporate social responsibility (CSR) management and communications. In this light, drawing on the prosocial motivation literature, this paper aims to investigate consumers’ implicit and explicit motivations for prosocial behavior, and how these two motivations interact to affect consumers’ willingness to contribute to CSR activities. Second, through the lens of sensemaking theory, this study evaluates the influence of successful prosocial behavior engagement on consumers’ perceptions of both self and companies’ prosocial identities, CSR authenticity and company evaluations.

Design/methodology/approach

This study adopts a dictator game experiment with 2 × 2 factorial design to gauge consumers’ prosocial behavioral response toward companies’ CSR communication with implicit and explicit motivations and to examine its effect on company evaluation.

Findings

In all, the results of this study suggest that implicit motivation, i.e. self-affirmation intervention, in CSR communication will cause consumers to donate more money to CSR programs; whereas explicit motivation does not exert an effect on consumers’ prosocial behavior. In addition, such donation will trigger consumers’ prosocial sensemaking process and lead to strong identification with the company, positive attitudes and behavioral intentions toward the company.

Originality/value

This study aims to build a consumer- and social cause-oriented CSR communication model, which maximizes the impact of CSR investments on consumer relationship building, business bottom line and social causes.

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

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Article
Publication date: 15 June 2015

Carmen Orte, Lluís Ballester, Martí X. March, Josep L. Oliver, Belén Pascual and Maria Antònia Gomila

This research assesses the predictive capacity of key factors in the development of family competences: parent-children relationship, family involvement, family resilience…

Abstract

Purpose

This research assesses the predictive capacity of key factors in the development of family competences: parent-children relationship, family involvement, family resilience and positive parenting. It also aims to establish which are the most discriminating factors between the groups showing the most and the least prosocial behaviours.

Design/methodology/approach

The study involves a longitudinal study of one child from 181 families; 155 families in the experimental group and 26 in the control group. Both boys and girls are included and their ages range from 8 to 14 years. The instruments employed are all validated for use with a Spanish population and include Karol Kumpfer’s questionnaires on family competence and the BASC questionnaire.

Findings

All of the factors analysed, with the exception of family involvement, proved to be predictive for prosocial behaviour, and the most discriminating among these were: parent-children relationship, family resilience and positive parenting.

Originality/value

One key issue in family prevention programmes is the development of prosocial behaviour. In this sense, the research developed here aims at highlighting protective factors as key to developing a prosocial behaviour.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2015

Aron O'Cass and Deborah Griffin

While social marketing has been utilised to bring about positive social change, ultimately, the decision to engage in prosocial behaviour resides with the individual. The…

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1001

Abstract

Purpose

While social marketing has been utilised to bring about positive social change, ultimately, the decision to engage in prosocial behaviour resides with the individual. The purpose of this paper is to explore the determinants and outcomes of prosocial behaviours.

Design/methodology/approach

A web-based self-administered survey was used to collect data from a convenience sample of largely university staff and students. Data obtained were analysed using SEM-based partial least squares methodology.

Findings

The results show that individuals who are future oriented and issue involved are more likely to engage in prosocial behaviour. Also, these individuals are more likely to assess fewer negative consequences and experience more positive feelings as a result of their prosocial behaviour.

Research limitations/implications

While the study focuses on two social issues, it does provide some explanation of self-reported behaviour, rather than intention to behave. However, future research could pay attention to a wider array of social issues and undertake post hoc testing to measure the characteristics of the chosen social issues. This may enhance findings, and provide greater support for the generalisability of the model. Also, future research could be directed towards the examining the role of perceived risk and feelings as an outcome of behaviour.

Practical implications

A better understanding of the prosocial individual can assist in designing more effective social marketing campaigns. In particular, focusing on positive feelings as a result of engaging in prosocial behaviour has practical implications.

Originality/value

Little attention has been given in the marketing and consumer behaviour literature to understanding the prosocial individual. To this end, this research empirically tests a model of prosocial behaviour for two social issues that integrates determinants (social responsibility, time orientation and issue involvement) and outcomes (assessment of negative consequences and feelings). Moreover, the results highlight that positive feelings are a significant outcome of prosocial behaviour.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 33 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Book part
Publication date: 18 December 2016

Sheheryar Banuri and Philip Keefer

Recent research suggests that prosocial organizations are likely to have more prosocial employees, and that this match plays a significant role in organization contracting…

Abstract

Recent research suggests that prosocial organizations are likely to have more prosocial employees, and that this match plays a significant role in organization contracting practices and productivity – for example, in government. Evidence suggests that selection plays a role: prosocial employees are more likely to join prosocial organizations. In this paper, we ask whether prosocial behavior increases with tenure in prosocial organizations. Using a unique sample of nearly 300 mid-career Indonesian public officials, we find that subjects with longer tenure in the public sector exhibit greater prosocial behavior.

Details

Experiments in Organizational Economics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-964-0

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Article
Publication date: 16 June 2021

Aluisius Hery Pratono and Ling Han

This article seeks to understand the role of prosocial behaviour and moral obligation in family business to explain the indirect relationship between family business…

Abstract

Purpose

This article seeks to understand the role of prosocial behaviour and moral obligation in family business to explain the indirect relationship between family business orientation and citizenship behaviour.

Design/methodology/approach

This study proposes a model to examine the role of moral obligation and prosocial behaviour in such a relationship to understand a link between family orientation and organisational citizenship behaviour. The authors provide empirical evidence to test the hypothesis by conducting an online survey of family business behaviour in the Indonesia context.

Findings

The family business orientation has a significant impact on citizenship behaviour, while prosocial behaviour and moral obligation offer an additional contribution. The results suggest that family business performance demonstrates how a family that owns the business sets the social purposes from various performance alternatives beyond profit, such as family orientation, prosocial behaviour, moral obligation and organisational citizenship behaviour.

Originality/value

This study extends the agency and stewardship theory by examining how family business performance becomes different from other firm performance where the mainstream of economic theory argues that the business attempts to maximise profit for the stakeholders. The findings suggest that incorporating the theory of social practice in family business enhances the concept of prosocial behaviour in family business value.

Details

Journal of Family Business Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2043-6238

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Article
Publication date: 6 July 2015

Jurgita Lazauskaite-Zabielske, Ieva Urbanaviciute and Dalia Bagdziuniene

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of prosocial and intrinsic motivation and their interaction in predicting employees’ organizational citizenship behaviour

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4811

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of prosocial and intrinsic motivation and their interaction in predicting employees’ organizational citizenship behaviour (OCB) and its dimensions.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 884 employees from Lithuanian public sector were surveyed. The hypotheses were tested using hierarchical regression and moderation analyses.

Findings

The results revealed that prosocial and intrinsic motivations predicted OCB and its dimensions. Moreover, intrinsic motivation was found to moderate the relationship between prosocial motivation and OCB and four of its dimensions, i.e. intrinsic motivation strengthened the relationship between prosocial motivation and OCB and its dimensions of altruism, courtesy, conscientiousness, and initiative.

Research limitations/implications

The correlational design of the study does not allow making causal statements. In addition, the sample consisted of public sector employees only; therefore, caution should be made when applying the results to private sector employees. Finally, since all measures were self-reported, the data may suffer from common method bias.

Originality/value

This study contributes to investigation of motivational antecedents of OCB by revealing the importance of prosocial and intrinsic motivation in predicting employees’ citizenship behaviour.

Details

Baltic Journal of Management, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5265

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Article
Publication date: 17 February 2012

Rachel E. Kane, Marshall J. Magnusen and Pamela L. Perrewé

This research aims to utilize Social Identity Theory to examine the role of identification on two forms of extra‐role behaviors, namely, organizational citizenship…

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2090

Abstract

Purpose

This research aims to utilize Social Identity Theory to examine the role of identification on two forms of extra‐role behaviors, namely, organizational citizenship behaviors (OCB) and prosocial behaviors.

Design/methodology/approach

This study examined college students' reports of their identification with the university, organizational citizenship behaviors, and prosocial behaviors.

Findings

Results indicate that individuals who are highly identified with their organization are more likely to perform OCB, whereas individuals who are highly identified with their community are more likely to participate in prosocial behaviors. In addition, the relationship between organizational identification and prosocial behavior was found to be fully mediated by community identification.

Research limitations/implications

The authors suggest that scholars take care when operationalizing OCB with actual behaviors that surpass task performance; these should differ from attitudes and common courtesy. Limitations include having constructs measured by the same source which can lead to common method variance.

Practical implications

Organizational identification may be an important factor when determining which individual will be willing to go the extra mile for the organization. Organizations may want to recruit, hire, and retain individuals who will identify with the organization as these individuals are more likely to go above and beyond task performance.

Originality/value

This study examined these two forms of extra‐role behavior simultaneously in order to better understand these behaviors as they occur.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2018

Spencer M. Ross and Sommer Kapitan

This work aims to use equity theory to explore how consumers assess prosocial actions as part of a mental portfolio of purchases and behaviors in a broader marketplace…

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2690

Abstract

Purpose

This work aims to use equity theory to explore how consumers assess prosocial actions as part of a mental portfolio of purchases and behaviors in a broader marketplace, seeking balance in market exchanges. Conceptualizing marketing exchange as both an exchange of perceived value and a balance between self- and collective-interest allows for segmentation by consumer sensitivity to equity and sheds light on why prosocial consumption might occur.

Design/methodology/approach

Two studies validate and segment consumers via their equity sensitivity. Between-subject designs with samples of consumers and marketing managers validate an equity sensitivity index that segments how people balance self- and collective-interests in marketplace exchange and predicts prosocial consumption choices.

Findings

The results indicate that Entitled decision makers are more willing to exchange collective-interest for self-interest and emphasize choices that maximize lower prices for consumers or greater profits for firms in lieu of prosocial outcomes. Benevolent decision makers, however, are more willing to exchange self-interest for collective-interest and support prosocial outcomes.

Originality/value

This work moves beyond research that focuses on attitudes, values and situational factors, instead using equity theory to uncover broader marketplace motivations for prosocial consumption. The research reveals that a motivating force behind prosocial consumption is how much consumers perceive they have given to, and gotten, from, the marketplace. Segmenting the market according to how consumers balance gains and losses provides an alternate approach to studying prosocial consumption, as well as a practical approach to developing targeted marketing strategies.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 52 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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