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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Nick French

Provides a brief overview of the methods that used in real estate valuation with a particular emphasis on the valuation of specialised property. Proposes that the…

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8307

Abstract

Provides a brief overview of the methods that used in real estate valuation with a particular emphasis on the valuation of specialised property. Proposes that the underlying requirement is to estimate market value and that the role of the valuer is to choose the method that is the best model to achieve this objective. Concludes that a valuer must work with the recognised techniques and, in the case of specialised property, these are methods that go back to analysing value from first principles by identifying the value of the property to the business.

Details

Journal of Property Investment & Finance, vol. 22 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-578X

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Article
Publication date: 13 February 2007

Bioye Tajudeen Aluko

The purpose of this research is to examine whether valuers consider and interpret intrinsic value elements in a residential property the same way in a familiar location…

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1483

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to examine whether valuers consider and interpret intrinsic value elements in a residential property the same way in a familiar location. The price people pay for a complex commodity like residential property is a sum of the utility of various intrinsic and extrinsic characteristics. The skill of the valuer rests in the recognition of value‐enhancing elements in order to arrive at a value for the subject property.

Design/methodology/approach

Relevant data for the study were gathered from a controlled‐experiment involving some residential properties and administration of questionnaires backed up with oral interviews on a random sample of 59 valuation firms in metropolitan Lagos, a commercial nerve‐center in the country. The data were analyzed using both descriptive statistics and analysis of variance.

Findings

The study showed that there are differences in the means and interpretation of value‐enhancing variables amongst valuation firms sampled. The study, inter alia, concluded that non‐duplicative nature of real estate, differences in the skills and degree of technical competence of the valuation firms including length of practice, absence of a centralized database and lack of valuation practice statements as well as updated guidance notes are the key factors, amongst others, responsible for the variability in the valuers' judgement in the study area.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the empirical literature in valuation accuracy by establishing the level of interpretative errors in residential property valuations and the key factors responsible for the variability in the valuers' judgement in the study area.

Details

Property Management, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

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Article
Publication date: 11 October 2021

Paul Korsi Simpson and Peter Korsi Simpson

The credibility of valuation is enhanced by the use of quality and reliable property market data. Nonetheless, the availability of quality and reliable market data remains…

Abstract

Purpose

The credibility of valuation is enhanced by the use of quality and reliable property market data. Nonetheless, the availability of quality and reliable market data remains a problem for valuers in Ghana, as current market data sources are tainted with issues of reliability. The purpose of this study is to examine the possibility of establishing property market data banks in Ghana, to help solve the market data problem faced by valuers.

Design/methodology/approach

This study adopted a mixed-method approach consisting of the identification and review of literature, interviews with officials from the Lands Valuation Division of the Lands Commission and a questionnaire survey of property valuers.

Findings

The study finds that it is possible for property market data banks to be established, and in the absence of facilitating legislation, partnerships among various stakeholders are the best way of achieving this. The study identifies the lack of initiative and the lack of partnerships among the various stakeholders inter alia as the major factors limiting the establishment of property market data banks. The findings imply a need for stakeholders to take initiative to establish a property market data bank aimed at improving the quality and reliability of market data to enhance the valuation practice.

Originality/value

The study asserts the possibility of creating a property market data bank in Ghana, notwithstanding the limiting factors. The findings will provide a basis for relevant institutions and agencies to take cooperative action for the establishment of property market data banks, towards enhancing the valuation practice in Ghana as well as in other developing countries. The study will also prompt research into various tools and mechanisms to be adopted towards the establishment of property market data banks through participatory means.

Details

Property Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

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Article
Publication date: 31 May 2021

Masresha Belete Asnakew and Minale Kassahun Amogne

The causes of valuation inaccuracy, the approaches, basis and procedures used for value estimation were not profoundly identified in Ethiopia. Particularly, the causes of…

Abstract

Purpose

The causes of valuation inaccuracy, the approaches, basis and procedures used for value estimation were not profoundly identified in Ethiopia. Particularly, the causes of property valuation inaccuracy for court decisions have not been assiduously studied by scholars. Hence, the ultimate goal of this study aims to identify the determinant variables of valuation inaccuracy, the approaches, basis and procedures used for court execution purposes.

Design/methodology/approach

This study employed both qualitative and quantitative approaches. The target populations of the study were the courts at the federal and regional levels. A purposive sampling technique was employed to undertake this study. The survey data was analyzed using the Relative Importance Index (RII).

Findings

The finding of this research revealed that courts have not outshined and uniform valuation manuals and guidelines that clearly state the approaches, procedures and bases of valuation. As a consequence, courts execute based on the opinion of value determined by other institutions. The insignificant numbers of independent valuation institution with the lack of uniform standards in the country prejudice the implementation of the decision of the court and faced injustice. The finding also reveals as there are several causative variables for real property valuation inaccuracy.

Practical implications

To alleviate the problem, the government should strengthen the valuation sector by creating an independent institution for advancing valuation regulation and policymaking.

Originality/value

This study was the first of all and could be a pointer for different government and non-government bodies regarding the limitations of valuation for judgment execution purposes.

Details

Property Management, vol. 39 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

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Article
Publication date: 26 February 2021

Georgia Warren-Myers and Lucy Cradduck

The purpose of this research is to investigate Australian property valuers' identification and consideration of physical risks to properties in valuation practice. The…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to investigate Australian property valuers' identification and consideration of physical risks to properties in valuation practice. The research further explores valuers' considerations of climate change-related risks.

Design/methodology/approach

The research approach comprised an online survey of Australian valuers who were members of the Australian Property Institute. The online survey included structured and unstructured questions to explore types and extent of risk investigations in valuation practice.

Findings

The analysis reflects that while valuers easily identified and engaged with physical risks, there is a lack of understanding of, and engagement with, climate change risks. This supports the need for better information sources and guidance to inform valuers of climate change risks per se, as well as the development of specific mechanisms for consideration of such risks to be included in valuation processes, practices and reports.

Research limitations/implications

The research is limited by the small sample size achieved due to the timing of the survey deployment, which occurred during the first wave of COVID-19 lockdowns in Australia. Thus, the findings are not necessarily representative of the Australian valuation profession, but they do provide indications of current approaches to risk identification in practice and the need for more guidance in relation to climate change risks.

Practical implications

This research identifies that more support, guidance, information and tools, as well as awareness-raising, are required to enable valuers to accurately identify all risks affecting a property.

Originality/value

The research provides a snapshot of current understandings of physical risk identification in valuation practice. As investors and other organisations integrate and build up their analysis of climate risks to their portfolios and organisations, this research indicates that valuers also need to be aware of changing market assessment of physical and climate risks associated with property for consideration in valuation.

Details

Journal of Property Investment & Finance, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-578X

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1994

Nick French and Neil Crosby

In the last few years a number of large operational companies in theUnited Kingdom have chosen to segregate the management of their propertyholdings from the day‐to‐day…

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4807

Abstract

In the last few years a number of large operational companies in the United Kingdom have chosen to segregate the management of their property holdings from the day‐to‐day running of their core business. This has either been achieved by forming property sections within the main company structure, or in some cases the hierarchy has been more clearly defined by the formation of subsidiary companies feeding into the parent company. The operational arm would then pay the property subsidiary an open market rental for each property that they occupy. The advantage of separating the property function from the core business is twofold. First, it allows the performance of each operational outlet to be measured on the same basis; and second, the investment performance of the properties themselves can now be measured. However, for the latter to occur, the properties need to be valued as investments and not as owner occupied. Under current RICS regulations this is not allowed and any property subject to an inter‐company let must be valued as if the lease agreement did not exist. Investigates the effect of the RICS guidelines on the valuation of properties let to related companies and highlights the problems of measuring the performance of the company′s property assets against a suitable benchmark.

Details

Journal of Property Finance, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0958-868X

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2000

Index by subjects, compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals: Facilities Volumes 8‐17; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes 8‐17; Property

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25524

Abstract

Index by subjects, compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals: Facilities Volumes 8‐17; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes 8‐17; Property Management Volumes 8‐17; Structural Survey Volumes 8‐17.

Details

Facilities, vol. 18 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2001

K.G.B. Bakewell

Compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals published by MCB University Press: Facilities Volumes 8‐18; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes…

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15564

Abstract

Compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals published by MCB University Press: Facilities Volumes 8‐18; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes 8‐18; Property Management Volumes 8‐18; Structural Survey Volumes 8‐18.

Details

Structural Survey, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-080X

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2000

K.G.B. Bakewell

Compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals published by MCB University Press: Facilities Volumes 8‐17; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes…

Downloads
22274

Abstract

Compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals published by MCB University Press: Facilities Volumes 8‐17; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes 8‐17; Property Management Volumes 8‐17; Structural Survey Volumes 8‐17.

Details

Property Management, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2001

Index by subjects, compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals: Facilities Volumes 8‐18; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes 8‐18; Property

Downloads
13700

Abstract

Index by subjects, compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals: Facilities Volumes 8‐18; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes 8‐18; Property Management Volumes 8‐18; Structural Survey Volumes 8‐18.

Details

Facilities, vol. 19 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

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