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Article
Publication date: 19 September 2022

Seow Eng Ong, Woei Chyuan Wong, Davin Wang and Choon Peng Lai

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of visual technology on the price discovery process in listings of residential properties in Singapore from 2015 to 2018.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of visual technology on the price discovery process in listings of residential properties in Singapore from 2015 to 2018.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors empirically model the effects of 360 virtual tours and drone video on four dimensions in price discovery – buyers’ arrival rate, sale probability, transaction prices and time-on-market – using a comprehensive data set for the residential properties in Singapore.

Findings

The analysis shows that the availability of virtual tours or drone video in a listing increases the arrival rate from potential buyers, the probability of a successful sale and the selling price. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that technologically enhanced tools improve the quality of information and the marketability of property. However, listings with virtual tours tend to be associated with longer marketing time, which is consistent with the prediction of the information overload hypothesis.

Research limitations/implications

This paper extends the housing and price discovery literature by examining how technologically enabled new information affects property transactions.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first paper to consider the impact of drone video on property market outcome.

Details

International Journal of Housing Markets and Analysis, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8270

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 5 August 2022

Philippos Nikiforou, Thomas Dimopoulos and Petros Sivitanides

The purpose of this study is to investigate how the degree of overpricing (DOP) and other variables are associated with the time on the market (TOM) and the final selling…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate how the degree of overpricing (DOP) and other variables are associated with the time on the market (TOM) and the final selling price (SP) for residential properties in the Paphos urban area.

Design/methodology/approach

The hedonic pricing model was used to examine the association of TOM and SP with various factors. The association of the independent variable of DOP and other independent variables with the two dependent variables of TOM and SP were investigated via ordinary least squares (OLS) regression models. In the first set of models the dependent variable was TOM and in the second set of models the dependent variable was SP. A sample of N = 538 completed transactions from Q1 2008 to Q2 2019 was used to estimate the optimum DOP that a seller must apply on the current market value of a property in order to achieve highest SP price in the shortest TOM.

Findings

The results of this study also suggest that the degree of overpricing in thin and less transparent markets is higher than that in transparent markets with high property transaction volumes. In mature markets like the USA and the UK where the actual sold prices are published, the DOP is around 1.5% which is much lower than the 11% DOP identified in this study.

Practical implications

It was found that buyers are willing to pay more for the same house in a bigger plot than a bigger house in the same plot. The outcome is that smaller houses sell faster at a higher price per square meter than larger houses. Smaller houses are more affordable than larger houses.

Social implications

There is a large pool of buyers for smaller houses than bigger houses. Higher demand for smaller houses results in a higher price per square meter for smaller houses than the price per square meter for bigger houses. Respectively the TOM for smaller houses is shorter than the TOM for bigger houses.

Originality/value

The database used is unique, from an estate agent located in Paphos that managed to sell more than 27,000 properties in 20 years. This data set is the most accurate information for Cyprus' property transactions.

Details

Journal of European Real Estate Research, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-9269

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1996

Shunichi Maekawa

In the past, the profit from property investments was always higher than that from other assets, because of the expectation of high rates of increase in land prices

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Abstract

In the past, the profit from property investments was always higher than that from other assets, because of the expectation of high rates of increase in land prices. However, as Japan′s economic growth has been slowing down, these circumstances for property investments have changed. The income yield rate of commercial property investments in Tokyo decreased sharply from 1982 to 1987 because of the sharp increase in land prices. Though commercial land prices in Tokyo have decreased since 1992, the income yield rate is too low because of decrease of office rents. If the income yield rate does not increase, demand for commercial property investments will not recover because a high rate of increase in land prices cannot be expected in the future.

Details

Journal of Property Valuation and Investment, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-2712

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 April 2022

David Rodriguez

Investors often utilize brokers to assist them in property acquisitions. These brokers are compensated through a cooperative commission, or bonus, that is publicized on…

Abstract

Purpose

Investors often utilize brokers to assist them in property acquisitions. These brokers are compensated through a cooperative commission, or bonus, that is publicized on the listing service. The purpose of this paper is to determine the relationship between advertised compensation packages and selling price, time-on-market and listing characteristics.

Design/methodology/approach

To examine variables likely to influence earnings of the buyers' broker, this study utilizes multiple and logistic regressions. Given the range of prices found in the 196,276 listings, the data was sorted on listing price and then split into ten, approximately equal, deciles.

Findings

The explanatory power of models with cooperative commission as the dependent variable was highest in the lowest deciles with type of financing, size and distressed status being highly significant. When comparing list- to selling price the average was 96.1%. As cooperative commission increased, the higher priced parcels sold at a higher price relative to list price. This potentially justifies higher cooperative commissions or exemplifies the principal-agent problem where effort is based on potential earnings. Fixed bonuses were used predominately for parcels under $62,234, likely to provide a minimum earnings amount. However, surrounding the median, it seems they may differentiate a property.

Practical implications

This research provides insight for practitioners on the impact of different variables, including cooperative commissions, on sale price and time-on-market. For example, cooperative commission increased for properties in the outer deciles implying that agents may be compensating for suspected difficulty. Additionally, the seasonality findings imply that agents can determine when to list and when to provide a fixed bonus to solicit attention. Results also suggest that practitioners will find it beneficial to market at an appropriate price rather than list high to create negotiating room.

Originality/value

This paper follows only one paper that covered a similar topic. However, this paper uses twenty years of multi-unit property listings from a major US city from 1996 to 2015. The focus on multi-unit properties is an effort to focus on a more sophisticated group of buyers that may be more experienced and make decisions more rationally.

Details

Property Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2022

Abdul Wahid, Oskar Kowalewski and Edmund H. Mantell

This research aims to identify the statistically significant characteristics of a hedonic model to explain the pricing of residential properties in two cities in Pakistan.

Abstract

Purpose

This research aims to identify the statistically significant characteristics of a hedonic model to explain the pricing of residential properties in two cities in Pakistan.

Design/methodology/approach

The research methodology applies extreme bounds analysis and the least absolute shrinkage and selection operator. Estimators of efficient pricing were measured via stochastic frontier analysis.

Findings

The study findings show that the market valuation of residential properties in Islamabad and Rawalpindi is systematically related to numerous factors, including property location, neighborhood characteristics, environmental characteristics, structural characteristics and administrative qualities of local housing societies. The authors also find statistical evidence that suggests that residential estate properties in the two cities are overpriced in the sense that the market transaction prices tend to be higher than the fair prices of the properties in the two cities.

Practical implications

In Pakistan, the term “real estate” is used rather synonymously with the word “investment.” The findings of this research will help investors to identify the measurable factors that affect the transaction prices of residential real estate. These identifications will facilitate the development of strategic plans toward achieving sustainable rates of return in residential real estate markets.

Social implications

The residential real estate sector in Pakistan is constantly changing. There are myriad causes for these changes, including changes in social structure, cultural attitudes and technology. Customary methods for forecasting market prices for residential properties have been rendered unreliable because of the dynamics of the market. This study will contribute to the understanding of the changing dynamics of residential real estate pricing.

Originality/value

Although Pakistan's residential real estate market is growing very rapidly, there is little published research identifying the drivers of this growth. This study covers these aspects to fill the theoretical gap in a real estate context.

Details

Journal of Property Investment & Finance, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-578X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 June 2021

Jayantha Wadu Mesthrige

“Ill-maintenance of common areas” in multi-owner residential properties is described as the “tragedy of anti-commons problem”. The problem can be addressed by outsourcing…

Abstract

Purpose

“Ill-maintenance of common areas” in multi-owner residential properties is described as the “tragedy of anti-commons problem”. The problem can be addressed by outsourcing the management of the property to a company possessing quality property management (PMGT) certification. The PMGT certification is normally hailed as an effective means of reassuring occupiers and prospective property buyers of the good level of quality of the property management to be expected. This study investigated whether PMGT certification carries with it a price premium for residential properties.

Design/methodology/approach

A fixed-effects modelling approach was employed in relation to a large residential properties dataset in Hong Kong, in the period 2009–2018.

Findings

The results indicate, on average, that the PMGT certification commands a price premium of between 3.3 and 3.9%. This premium can be called, the “tragedy of anti-commons premium (TAC premium)”. The results further suggest that significant price premium differences relate to the four different types of certifications studied. The price of a residential unit managed by a property management company (PMC) with Q-mark certification is about 3.4% higher than a unit managed by a non-certified PMC, ceteris paribus. Likewise, corresponding price premiums for units certified related to ISO9001 and HKMAQA certifications are 3.5 and 2.4%, respectively.

Originality/value

To the best of author's knowledge, this is the first attempt to investigate if there is any relationship between the property price premium attributed to “tragedy of anti-commons” and PMGT certification.

Details

Property Management, vol. 39 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 21 August 2018

Jonas Hahn, Jens Hirsch and Sven Bienert

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the role of distinct types of heating technology and their price impact in German residential real estate markets, considering…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the role of distinct types of heating technology and their price impact in German residential real estate markets, considering a wide range of other housing market determinants. The authors aim to test and to verify specifically, whether the obsolescence of heating technology leads to a significant price discount and whether higher technological standards (and environmental friendliness) come with a price premium on the market.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors create housing market models for rental and sales segments by constructing generalized additive models with explicit multi-layered spatial components. To elaborate a profound and contemporary answer using these models, the authors perform large-sample regression analyses based on more than 400,000 observations covering German residential properties in 2015.

Findings

First and foremost, the heating system indeed shows significant explanatory importance for measuring housing rents and purchasing price. Second, the authors find that it makes a difference whether clean “green” technologies are implemented or whether “brown” systems with obsolete technology or fossil energy sources is on hand. Ultimately, the authors conclude that while low energy consumption indeed comes with a price premium, this needs to be interpreted together with the property’s heating type, as housing markets seem to outweigh the “green premium” by “brown discounts” if low energy consumption figures are powered by a certain type of heating technology system.

Research limitations/implications

Aside of a possible omitted variable bias, the main research limitation is constituted by the integration of asking prices in the analysis, as actual transaction prices are not systematically transparent on national level in Germany. Limitations are discussed at the end of the paper.

Practical implications

This work supports investors who face the challenge of making environmental- and energy-related decisions as well as appraisers who deliver financial fundamentals for such. Third, the paper supports both asset managers as well as investment strategists in argumentation pro-environmental investments beyond all ecological necessity.

Social implications

This paper contributes to the current discussion on climate change and the eclectic role of real estate in this context. The authors deliver evidence on pricing effects as a measure of socioeconomic acceptance of progressive heating technology and environmental friendliness as an imperative of twenty-first century societies.

Originality/value

This is the first study on “green premiums” or “brown discounts” that includes heating technology as a potential and distinct driver of value and rents. It is a contemporary contribution and delivers original information on the quantitative impact of contemporary and anachronistic technology in heating to researchers as well as investors and appraisers.

Details

Property Management, vol. 36 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2000

Index by subjects, compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals: Facilities Volumes 8‐17; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes 8‐17; Property

26894

Abstract

Index by subjects, compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals: Facilities Volumes 8‐17; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes 8‐17; Property Management Volumes 8‐17; Structural Survey Volumes 8‐17.

Details

Facilities, vol. 18 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2001

K.G.B. Bakewell

Compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals published by MCB University Press: Facilities Volumes 8‐18; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes…

17193

Abstract

Compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals published by MCB University Press: Facilities Volumes 8‐18; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes 8‐18; Property Management Volumes 8‐18; Structural Survey Volumes 8‐18.

Details

Structural Survey, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-080X

Article
Publication date: 30 March 2020

Joseph Awoamim Yacim and Douw Gert Brand Boshoff

The paper introduced the use of a hybrid system of neural networks support vector machines (NNSVMs) consisting of artificial neural networks (ANNs) and support vector…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper introduced the use of a hybrid system of neural networks support vector machines (NNSVMs) consisting of artificial neural networks (ANNs) and support vector machines (SVMs) to price single-family properties.

Design/methodology/approach

The mechanism of the hybrid system is such that its output is given by the SVMs which utilise the results of the ANNs as their input. The results are compared to other property pricing modelling techniques including the standalone ANNs, SVMs, geographically weighted regression (GWR), spatial error model (SEM), spatial lag model (SLM) and the ordinary least squares (OLS). The techniques were applied to a dataset of 3,225 properties sold during the period, January 2012 to May 2014 in Cape Town, South Africa.

Findings

The results demonstrate that the hybrid system performed better than ANNs, SVMs and the OLS. However, in comparison to the spatial models (GWR, SEM and SLM) the hybrid system performed abysmally under with SEM favoured as the best pricing technique.

Originality/value

The findings extend the debate in the body of knowledge that the results of the OLS can significantly be improved through the use of spatial models that correct bias estimates and vary prices across the different property locations. Additionally, utilising the result of the hybrid system is thus affected by the black-box nature of the ANNs and SVMs limiting its use to purposes of checks on estimates predicted by the regression-based models.

Details

Property Management, vol. 38 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

Keywords

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