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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1996

Peter Wyatt

Property valuers in England and Wales face a difficult task; they must collect and assimilate data from a variety of sources which differ widely with regard to quality…

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2591

Abstract

Property valuers in England and Wales face a difficult task; they must collect and assimilate data from a variety of sources which differ widely with regard to quality, currency and coverage. This is because of legislative restrictions on access to public sector data sources and organizational constraints on access to property data within the private sector, such as confidentiality and commercial secrecy. Proposes a system for the dissemination of property data for valuation and other property‐related procedures, namely, a National Land Information Service (NLIS). Suggests that a NLIS should be developed using geographical information system technology. Describes a methodology which shows how a spatial analysis technique available on a GIS was used to examine the influence of accessibility on property value.

Details

Journal of Property Valuation and Investment, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-2712

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Article
Publication date: 21 August 2017

Kwasi Gyau Baffour Awuah, Frank Gyamfi-Yeboah, David Proverbs and Jessica Elizabeth Lamond

Adequate reliable property market data are critical to the production of professional and ethical valuations as well as better real estate transaction decision-making…

Abstract

Purpose

Adequate reliable property market data are critical to the production of professional and ethical valuations as well as better real estate transaction decision-making. However, the availability of reliable property market information represents a major barrier to improving valuation practices in Ghana and it is regarded as a key challenge. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the sources and reliability of property market information for valuation practice in Ghana. The aim is to provide input into initiatives to address the availability of reliable property market data challenges.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed methods research approach is used. The study, thus, relies on a combination of a systematic identification and review of literature, a stakeholder workshop and a questionnaire survey of real estate valuers in Accra, Ghana’s capital city to obtain requisite data to address the aim.

Findings

The study identifies seven property market data sources used by valuers to obtain market data for valuation practice. These are: valuers own database; public institutions; professional colleagues; property owners; estate developers; estate agents; and the media. However, access to property market information for valuations is a challenge although valuers would like to use reliable market data for their valuations. This is due to incomplete and scattered nature of data often borne out of administrative lapses; non-disclosure of details of property transactions due to confidentiality arrangements and the quest to evade taxes; data integrity concerns; and lack of requisite training and experience especially for estate agents to collect and manage market data. Although professional colleagues is the most used market data source, valuers own databases, was regarded as the most reliable source compared to the media, which was considered as the least reliable source.

Research limitations/implications

Findings from the study imply a need for the development of a systematic approach to property market data collection and management. This will require practitioners to demonstrate care, consciousness and a set of data collection skills suggesting a need for valuers and estate agents to undergo regular relevant training to develop and enhance their knowledge, skills and capabilities. The establishment of a property market databank to help in the provision of reliable market data along with a suitable market data collection template to ensure effective and efficient data collection are considered essential steps.

Originality/value

The study makes a significant contribution to the extant knowledge by providing empirical evidence on the frequency of use and the reliability of the various sources of market data. It also provides useful insights for regulators such as the Ghana Institution of Surveyors (GhIS), the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) and other stakeholders such as the Commonwealth Association of Surveying and Land Economy (CASLE) and the Government to improve the provision of reliable property market information towards developing valuation practice not only in Ghana, but across the Sub-Saharan Africa Region. Also, based on these findings, the study proposes a new property market data collection template and guidelines towards improving the collection of effective property market data. Upon refinement, these could aid valuation practitioners to collect reliable property market data to improve valuation practice.

Details

Property Management, vol. 35 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

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Article
Publication date: 14 November 2016

Sara J. Wilkinson and Julie R. Jupp

Building information modelling (BIM) offers rich opportunities for property professionals to use information throughout the property life cycle. However, the benefits of…

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1355

Abstract

Purpose

Building information modelling (BIM) offers rich opportunities for property professionals to use information throughout the property life cycle. However, the benefits of BIM for property professionals are largely untapped. BIM was developed by the architecture, engineering and construction (AEC) sector to assist in managing design and construction data. As these technologies mature and evolve, so does the opportunity for other professional groups to use data within, or linked to, BIM models. This paper aims to explore the potential for corporate real estate managers (CREM) and investment surveyors to use data contained in BIM models and building management systems, which could help these professionals with strategic planning, portfolio rationalisation and acquisitions.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a scoping study to explore the potential to expand the scope of BIM to other professional activities. As such, the research adopted a Delphi approach with a series of workshops with experienced stakeholders in Australia and England. Qualitative research is inductive and hypothesis-generating. That is, as the researcher assimilates knowledge and information contained in the literature, ideas and questions are formed, which are put to research participants, and, from this process, conclusions are drawn.

Findings

It is technologically feasible for some property professionals, such as CREM, to use some data contained within BIM, and linked building management systems. The types of data used by property professionals were identified and ranked in importance. Needs are varied, both in the range of data and the points in the property life cycle when they are required. The benefits identified include potentially accessing and using more reliable and accurate data in professional tasks; however, challenges exist around the fidelity of the data and assurances that it is current.

Research limitations/implications

The key limitations of the research were that the views expressed are those of a select group of experienced practitioners and may not represent the consensus view of the professions and industry as a whole. The limitations and criticisms of focus group data collection are that individuals holding strong views may dominate the sessions.

Practical implications

The findings show that expanding access to BIM could enable some property professionals, including CREM, to utilise relevant data that could improve the quality and accuracy of their professional services. A simple initial system could be trialled to ascertain the value of the data. Over time, the availability of data could be extended to allow more professionals access. Furthermore, there is potential to link BIM to other digitised property data in the future.

Originality/value

To date, no one has considered the practicality or potential utility of expanding the access to data contained in 3D BIM models to property professionals, nor has anyone considered which data would be useful to them. The value of using BIM data is that, as more property stock is delivered and maintained via BIM-enabled processes, it will be possible for a wider range of professionals such as CREM and investment surveyors to offer more accurate advice and services to clients.

Details

Journal of Corporate Real Estate, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-001X

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Article
Publication date: 27 April 2018

Rotimi Boluwatife Abidoye and Albert P.C. Chan

The demand for accurate property value estimation by valuation report end users has led to a shift towards advanced property valuation modelling techniques in some property

Abstract

Purpose

The demand for accurate property value estimation by valuation report end users has led to a shift towards advanced property valuation modelling techniques in some property markets and these require a sizeable number of data set to function. In a situation where there is a lack of a centralised transaction data bank, scholars and practitioners usually collect data from different sources for analysis, which could affect the accuracy of property valuation estimates. This study aims to establish the suitability of different data sources that are reliable for estimating accurate property values.

Design/methodology/approach

This study adopts the Lagos metropolis property market, Nigeria, as the study area. Transaction data of residential properties are collected from two sources, i.e. from real estate firms (selling price) and listing prices from an online real estate company. A portion of the collected data is fitted into the artificial neural network (ANN) model, which is used to predict the remaining property prices. The holdout sample data are predicted with the developed ANN models. Thereafter, the predicted prices and the actual prices are compared so as to establish which data set generates the most accurate property valuation estimates.

Findings

It is found that the listing data (listing prices) produced an encouraging mean absolute error (MAE), root mean square error (RMSE) and mean absolute percentage error (MAPE) values compared with the firms’ data (selling prices). An MAPE value of 26.93 and 29.96 per cent was generated from the listing and firms’ data, respectively. A larger proportion of the predicted listing prices had property valuation error of margin that is within the industry acceptable standard of between ±0 and 10 per cent, compared with the predicted selling prices. Also, a higher valuation accuracy was recorded in properties with lower values, compared with expensive properties.

Practical implications

The opaqueness in real estate transactions consummated in developing nations could be attributed to why selling prices (data) could not produce more accurate valuation estimates in this study than listing prices. Despite the encouraging results produced using listing prices, there is still an urgent need to maintain a robust and quality property data bank in developing nations, as obtainable in most developed nations, so as to achieve a sustainable global property valuation practice.

Originality/value

This study does not investigate the relationship between listing prices and selling prices, which has been conducted in previous studies, but examines their suitability to improve property valuation accuracy in an emerging property market. The findings of this study would be useful in property markets where property transaction data bank is not available.

Details

International Journal of Housing Markets and Analysis, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8270

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Article
Publication date: 7 June 2019

Daramola Thompson Olapade, Benjamin Gbolahan Ekemode and Abel Olaleye

Earlier studies have suggested the creation of a central database of concluded property transactions as a panacea to the property data debacle. It is in this regard that…

Abstract

Purpose

Earlier studies have suggested the creation of a central database of concluded property transactions as a panacea to the property data debacle. It is in this regard that the purpose of this paper is to examine the perception of potential users of centralised property database on the consideration for the design and management of such database.

Design/methodology/approach

Questionnaires were administered on 190 property practitioners (referred as estate surveying and valuation firms) in Lagos property market. Frequency index, frequency distribution and percentage were employed for data analysis.

Findings

The result showed that respondents preferred a web-based databank and free access to the information in the databank by those who recorded their market data in it. They also preferred uniform recording standard in the databank, an interface that must be user friendly and secure to prevent unauthorised user from gaining access, amongst others. The practitioners also preferred that their professional body manage the databank when it is created.

Practical implications

The paper provides useful insights into creating a property database that will improve accessibility to property data in opaque markets.

Originality/value

There is still little or no empirical research on framework/end-users’ requirements for the creation of property transaction database in emerging property markets.

Details

Journal of Property Investment & Finance, vol. 37 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-578X

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2006

Alastair Adair, Suzanne Allen, Jim Berry and Stanley McGreal

This paper seeks to assess issues of data and the extent to which property markets are becoming more transparent in Central and Eastern Europe, discussing stages in the…

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2359

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to assess issues of data and the extent to which property markets are becoming more transparent in Central and Eastern Europe, discussing stages in the transformation and evolution of markets with reference to sources of real estate information.

Design/methodology/approach

Current perspectives on data sharing and drivers for change in Central and Eastern Europe draw on evidence from structured interviews with key market players in the region. This is supported by a consideration of secondary data sources.

Findings

The analysis indicates that information on stock characteristics, notably offices, has developed since the start of the 1990s but there remains an absence of performance benchmarking in the investment market. Conclusions highlight the significant process of change but identify the need for property investment markets to be more accurately measured and tracked.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations arise from data, in particular restricted time series data, lack of disclosure of data due to their intrinsic value, the perceived benefit of holding a competitive advantage and issues arising from the compatibility between various data sources.

Originality/value

The paper considers the relationship between the availability of market data and the development of properly functioning markets in Central and Eastern Europe; the attributes that have encouraged the development, availability and effective use of property market data; and the impacts of data availability on patterns of property market development in Central and Eastern Europe.

Details

Journal of Property Investment & Finance, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-578X

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Article
Publication date: 2 August 2011

Franz Fuerst, Patrick McAllister, Jorn van de Wetering and Peter Wyatt

Given the centrality of data and information to the evaluation and operation of policies to reduce carbon emissions, the purpose of this paper is to investigate potential…

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3193

Abstract

Purpose

Given the centrality of data and information to the evaluation and operation of policies to reduce carbon emissions, the purpose of this paper is to investigate potential sources of data within in the UK on the commercial building stock in terms of its physical characteristics, financial performance, energy consumption and environmental performance. The research aimed to increase understanding of the potential sources of data on property attributes, financial performance and energy use or environmental performance, with a particular emphasis on evaluating their strengths and weaknesses in terms of scope, quality, availability and practicability.

Design/methodology/approach

This is an explorative, qualitative study that uses semi‐structured interviews conducted with 11 different data holding organisations.

Findings

Whilst public sector organisations have the potential to provide the data required for large samples, there are major barriers to obtaining and linking the different databases. Data on the three key data elements (prices, attributes and environmental performance) tend to be split between different governmental agencies. There are likely to be substantial problems (and costs) of linking the databases due, in particular, to definitional differences. There is a conflict between government's public good objective of increasing knowledge of the environmental performance of buildings and its objective of maximising revenues from the commercial exploitation of data. Since the private sector organisations that hold data are commercially motivated, the samples that they have gathered are largely client driven and, consequently, tend to be partial, particular, proprietary, private and product‐related.

Originality/value

Since pricing studies are central to evaluating the effectiveness of eco‐labelling in property markets, this paper improves one's understanding of the role of information and data barriers to improving the allocative efficiency of commercial property markets.

Details

Journal of Financial Management of Property and Construction, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-4387

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1997

William McCluskey, William Deddis, Adam Mannis, Dillon McBurney and Richard Borst

Provides an outline of research seeking to apply to computer assisted mass appraisal (CAMA) model capable of use within a geographic information system (GIS). The end…

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2242

Abstract

Provides an outline of research seeking to apply to computer assisted mass appraisal (CAMA) model capable of use within a geographic information system (GIS). The end product will be a working GIS/valuation integrated model. The model, in an operational context, can be utilized for property taxation purposes, to facilitate the rating and revaluation of residential properties in Northern Ireland. As the value of land and property is a function of economic, legal, physical and locational factors, consequently access to comprehensive, reliable and up‐to‐date transaction evidence is a prerequisite to property valuation. Valuation techniques depend on the collection and analysis of relevant data. Historically, the application of these techniques took place within a non‐spatial environment. Ultimately, market data support any estimate of value. Data searches and collection can prove both time consuming and expensive in relation to the fee earning potential of a valuation report. GIS can facilitate, in a spatial and aspatial context, the storage, manipulation and analysis of data, in a fraction of the time previously required. Current techniques for the mass appraisal of property, and for the prediction of residential property values, can be enhanced by utilizing the data handling capacity of GIS. Integration of a mass appraisal model within a GIS will add value to the valuation process.

Details

Journal of Property Valuation and Investment, vol. 15 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-2712

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Article
Publication date: 14 August 2018

Daramola Thompson Olapade and Abel Olaleye

With a focus on Lagos property market, the purpose of this paper is to examine the factors that influence accessibility to data for valuation and investment analysis in…

Abstract

Purpose

With a focus on Lagos property market, the purpose of this paper is to examine the factors that influence accessibility to data for valuation and investment analysis in Nigeria. This was with a view to improving accessibility to property data in the market, thereby enhancing investment appraisal practice.

Design/methodology/approach

Primary data utilized for the study were sourced through the use of questionnaire administered on property practitioners (referred to as estate surveying and valuation (ESV) firms) in Lagos property market. A total of 190 ESV firms were selected using stratified random sampling based on their geographical location. Relative significance index (RSI), frequency distribution and principal component analysis (PCA) were employed for data analysis.

Findings

A total of 19 factors were identified as affecting accessibility to data. Confidentiality attached to property data by practitioners was ranked as the most significant factor with RSI of 0.81. The next three factors were lack of cooperation within members of professional body (0.79), accuracy of data (0.76) and duty of care to client (0.75), while the least ranked factor was duplication of data set (0.63). All the 19 variables were further grouped into six principal factors using PCA, namely, economic, attitudinal, ethical, legal, administrative and technical factors; with each factor explaining the following variance, 16.75, 16.1, 13.64, 12.78, 10.51 and 7.95, respectively.

Practical implications

The paper’s results will enable stakeholders to address the challenges to data accessibility in Lagos property market and similar opaque markets elsewhere thereby enhancing property data accessibility and investment analysis.

Originality/value

The paper is an attempt to examine the factors affecting accessibility to data identified in different studies holistically together in a single study and from the perspective of an emerging property market like Nigeria.

Details

Property Management, vol. 37 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

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Article
Publication date: 11 October 2021

Paul Korsi Simpson and Peter Korsi Simpson

The credibility of valuation is enhanced by the use of quality and reliable property market data. Nonetheless, the availability of quality and reliable market data remains…

Abstract

Purpose

The credibility of valuation is enhanced by the use of quality and reliable property market data. Nonetheless, the availability of quality and reliable market data remains a problem for valuers in Ghana, as current market data sources are tainted with issues of reliability. The purpose of this study is to examine the possibility of establishing property market data banks in Ghana, to help solve the market data problem faced by valuers.

Design/methodology/approach

This study adopted a mixed-method approach consisting of the identification and review of literature, interviews with officials from the Lands Valuation Division of the Lands Commission and a questionnaire survey of property valuers.

Findings

The study finds that it is possible for property market data banks to be established, and in the absence of facilitating legislation, partnerships among various stakeholders are the best way of achieving this. The study identifies the lack of initiative and the lack of partnerships among the various stakeholders inter alia as the major factors limiting the establishment of property market data banks. The findings imply a need for stakeholders to take initiative to establish a property market data bank aimed at improving the quality and reliability of market data to enhance the valuation practice.

Originality/value

The study asserts the possibility of creating a property market data bank in Ghana, notwithstanding the limiting factors. The findings will provide a basis for relevant institutions and agencies to take cooperative action for the establishment of property market data banks, towards enhancing the valuation practice in Ghana as well as in other developing countries. The study will also prompt research into various tools and mechanisms to be adopted towards the establishment of property market data banks through participatory means.

Details

Property Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

Keywords

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