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Open Access
Article
Publication date: 17 June 2019

Pooja Chaoji and Miia Martinsuo

This paper empirically investigates the processes by which manufacturing firms create radical innovations in their core production process, referred to as radical…

2157

Abstract

Purpose

This paper empirically investigates the processes by which manufacturing firms create radical innovations in their core production process, referred to as radical manufacturing technology innovations (RMTI). The purpose of this paper is to improve the understanding of the processes and practices manufacturing firms use to create RMTI.

Design/methodology/approach

Creation processes for 23 RMTI projects from diverse industry and technology contexts are explored. Data were collected via semi-structured interviews, and an inductive analysis was carried out to identify similarities and differences in RMTI types and creation processes.

Findings

Three types of RMTI and three alternative RMTI creation processes are revealed and characterized. An integrated view is developed of the activities of the equipment supplier and the manufacturing firm, highlighting their different roles and interaction across the three RMTI creation process types.

Research limitations/implications

The exploratory design limits the depth of the analysis per RMTI project, and the focus is on manufacturing technology innovations in one country. The results extend previous case and context-specific findings on RMTI creation processes and provide novel frameworks for cross-case comparisons.

Practical implications

The manufacturing firms’ proactive role in RMTI creation is defined. A framework is proposed for using different RMTI creation processes for different types of RMTI.

Originality/value

This study addresses recent calls for empirical research on understanding the ways in which process innovations unfold in manufacturing firms. The findings emphasize the role of manufacturing firms as creators of RMTI in addition to their role as innovation adopters and implementers and reveal the suitability of different RMTI creation processes for different RMTI types.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 30 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 16 September 2017

Ramana Nanda and Matthew Rhodes-Kropf

Past work has shown that failure tolerance by principals has the potential to stimulate innovation, but has not examined how this affects which projects principals will…

Abstract

Past work has shown that failure tolerance by principals has the potential to stimulate innovation, but has not examined how this affects which projects principals will start. We demonstrate that failure tolerance has an equilibrium price – in terms of an investor’s required share of equity – that increases in the level of radical innovation. Financiers with investment strategies that tolerate early failure will endogenously choose to fund less radical innovations, while the most radical innovations (for whom the price of failure tolerance is too high) can only be started by investors who are not failure tolerant. Since policies to stimulate innovation must often be set before specific investments in innovative projects are made, this creates a trade-off between a policy that encourages experimentation ex post and the one that funds experimental projects ex ante. In equilibrium, it is possible that all competing financiers choose to offer failure tolerant contracts to attract entrepreneurs, leaving no capital to fund the most radical, experimental projects in the economy. The impact of different innovation policies can help to explain who finances radical innovations, and when and where radical innovation occurs.

Details

Entrepreneurship, Innovation, and Platforms
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-080-8

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 July 2019

Anne Live Vaagaasar, Ralf Müller and Donatella De Paoli

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the triadic relationship between project workspace (i.e. spatial context), project type and project manager’s leadership style…

1193

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the triadic relationship between project workspace (i.e. spatial context), project type and project manager’s leadership style. It develops the concept of leadership construct (i.e. mental models of leadership to predispose the way leadership is performed) to explain related preferences for workspace and behaviors.

Design/methodology/approach

A combination of phenomenological inquiry on preferred workspaces in different project types is combined with a conceptual study on related leadership styles in these settings.

Findings

Four different leadership constructs are identified, which are conditioned by workspace and project type: one-on-one, virtual, interactive and mixed leadership. Also, four leadership patterns are identified, and these are related to open office and virtual office settings in product, service, software development and infrastructure construction projects.

Research limitations/implications

The results show the interaction of workspace, project type and leadership styles, which extends existing leadership theory and provides more granularity in determining appropriate leadership styles for project managers.

Practical implications

Practitioners benefit from a more conscious selection of appropriate leadership styles, which positively impacts project results.

Originality/value

By linking workspace, project type and leadership styles, the study is the first of its kind and a novel contribution to theory in project leadership.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Integrated Land-Use and Transportation Models
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-080-44669-1

Book part
Publication date: 17 March 2020

John E. Kello and Joseph A. Allen

Previous research on workplace meetings identified critical design features, leader behaviors, group dynamics, post-meeting actions, and other factors which help determine…

Abstract

Previous research on workplace meetings identified critical design features, leader behaviors, group dynamics, post-meeting actions, and other factors which help determine the effectiveness of the meeting. But as much as the authors acknowledge that meetings may differ from each other, much of the research appears to assume that it is meaningful to talk about “the meeting” as a single, generic entity (most commonly, the regularly scheduled staff or department meeting). In fact, though, there are several common types of meetings which vary among themselves in terms of a number of measurable parameters such as structure, meeting members, meeting leader, timing and duration, and scope. It is a gratuitous assumption that what the authors know about workplace meetings based on one especially common type applies to all workplace meetings. This chapter offers a historical review of previous attempts to classify meeting types; it then overviews several common types which deviate from the standard staff meeting paradigm, including project team meetings, debrief meetings, committee meetings, site-wide meetings, shift change meetings, and crew formation meetings. In comparing these types to the staff meeting, the authors identify some of the critical differences, thereby providing a first step toward a true taxonomy of meetings.

Article
Publication date: 18 February 2021

Kangning Wei, Kevin Crowston and U. Yeliz Eseryel

This paper explores how task characteristics in terms of trigger type and task topic influence individual participation in community-based free/libre open source software…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper explores how task characteristics in terms of trigger type and task topic influence individual participation in community-based free/libre open source software (FLOSS) development by considering participation in individual tasks rather than entire projects.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative study was designed using choose tasks that were carried out via the email discourse on the developers' email fora in five FLOSS projects. Choice process episodes were selected as the unit of analysis and were coded for the task trigger and topic. The impact of these factors on participation (i.e. the numbers of participants and messages) was assessed by regression.

Findings

The results reveal differences in participation related to different task triggers and task topics. Further, the results suggest the mediating role of the number of participants in the relationships between task characteristics and the number of messages. The authors also speculate that project type serves as a boundary condition restricting the impacts of task characteristics on the number of participants and propose this relationship for future research.

Research limitations/implications

Empirical support was provided to the important effects of different task characteristics on individual participation behaviors in FLOSS development tasks.

Practical implications

The findings can help FLOSS participants understand participation patterns in different tasks and choose the types of tasks to attend to.

Originality/value

This research explores the impact of task characteristics on participation in FLOSS development at the task level, while prior research on participation in FLOSS development has focused mainly on factors at the individual and/or project levels.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 31 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 July 2015

Jongsoo Choi

The purpose of this paper is to examine the stock market reactions at the time of new construction contract winning announcements to explore whether the managements made…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the stock market reactions at the time of new construction contract winning announcements to explore whether the managements made wise bidding decisions and thus create values.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 813 new contracts awarded to publicly traded US construction firms for the years 2000 through 2009 are screened and these are analyzed by applying event study methodology. This paper estimates the effect of an event on stock market’s responses, using cumulative abnormal returns (CARs), and the CAR values are estimated for four types of windows: days 0 (i.e. the day of the event announcement), (−1, +1), (−2, +2), and (−3, +3). The market responses are further subdivided according to such variables as the project type, owner type, project location, work scope, and bidder size.

Findings

The results of this study show that the stock market did not curse contract winners by positively responding to the announcements of new contract awards. The sample firms’ market value, on average, is increased by 1.168 percent during the seven-day window period, and is highly significant. In addition, the followings are observed: first, the stock market tends to favor larger contracts over smaller ones; second, small firms’ events receive better market responses than those of large ones; and third, the level of returns varies considerably across the project types. Meanwhile, no statistical differences are observed in CARs for the owner type, work scope, and project location variables.

Research limitations/implications

This study has several limitations. First, potential factors that may have effects on CAR could not be incorporated in the analysis, because a contract award announcement provides only limited information. Second, the level of consistency between stock market responses and the contract’s actual outcomes could not be assessed.

Practical implications

Wise bidding decision has critical implication considering the impact of a new contract award on a firm; a new contract increases the backlog of a firm while it may harm/improve the operating performance or decrease/increase the stockholders’ wealth. Although the overall success level of the current sample, in terms of CARs, is positive and significant, CAR values vary significantly depending on the window period and/or variables. Therefore, managements should exercise careful discretion in selecting a target project and arriving at a bidding decision.

Originality/value

While event study has been widespread for assessing the effect of numerous event types, project award received scarcely any attention. Moreover, it has widely been believed that cost/pricing and contract value are the primary sources for winners’ curse argument. Accordingly, this study can be considered as a seminal work assessing stock market responses to validate winners’ curse argument. This study contributes to the body of knowledge of decision-making discipline. In addition, from a strategic management perspective, the evidence and implications drawn from the analysis results will be valuable resources for bid or no-bid decision making in the project-based industry.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 53 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 October 2016

Ayedh Alqahtani and Andrew Whyte

This paper aims to identify the main non-cost factors affecting accurate estimation of life cycle cost (LCC) in building projects.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to identify the main non-cost factors affecting accurate estimation of life cycle cost (LCC) in building projects.

Design/methodology/approach

Ten factors affecting LCC in building project cost estimates are identified through literature and interviews. A questionnaire survey is conducted to rank these factors in order of priority and provide the views of cost practitioners about the significance of these factors in the accurate estimation of LCC. The data from 138 construction building projects completed in UK were collected and analysed via multiple regression to discover the relationship between capital and LCCs and between non-cost factors and cost estimation at each stage of the life cycle (capital, operation, maintenance and LCC).

Findings

The results of analysis of existing LCC data of completing project and survey data from cost professionals are mostly consistent with many literature views and provide a reasonable description of the non-cost factors affecting the accuracy of estimates.

Originality/value

The value of this study is in the method used, which involves analysis of existing life data and survey data from cost professionals. The results provide a plausible description of the non-cost factors affecting the accuracy of estimates.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 May 2011

Gangcheol Yun, Dohyoung Shin, Hansoo Kim and Sangyoub Lee

The purpose of this study was to investigate and propose the appropriate K‐mapping models as an approach to integrating key project components and technologies for the

3919

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to investigate and propose the appropriate K‐mapping models as an approach to integrating key project components and technologies for the effective improvement of project performance within and across construction projects.

Design/methodology/approach

In this holistic, single‐case study, one of the largest construction consulting firms in South Korea has been studied by conducting 15 semi‐structured interviews and the different loci for each of the K‐mapping components are identified and analyzed. Based on the different loci, four types of the K‐mapping model are provided and elucidated.

Findings

Research findings indicate that these four types of the K‐mapping model provide the criteria to identify the appropriate types of K‐map for construction project organizations, according to the characteristics and conditions of their own construction personnel, construction processes, and K‐transfer technologies. With the K‐mapping models, an appropriate knowledge management system (KMS) can be developed more effectively.

Research limitations/implications

First, as interpretivism was adopted as the research philosophy, the case study findings were subjective and qualitative to both the interviewees in the case study company and the researchers, though this study provided an important underpinning for future research on K‐mapping within construction project organizations. Second, the theory developed in this study was based on an investigation of the appropriate K‐mapping models with only a single case study. Nevertheless, this case study provided sufficient data and information to develop and propose a theory for successful K‐mapping model development within construction project organizations.

Originality/value

In the KM area, the definition, benefits, purposes, principles and types of K‐map have been already provided by many KM researchers and practitioners. However, no industry (practical)‐based K‐mapping model has been developed and proposed, especially in the construction industry. Accordingly, the originality of this study to be presented in one of the paper's conclusions: construction processes must be considered and adopted as a key component in the K‐mapping process, and the discussion of the four types of K‐map this research have generated, which significantly expands the existing literature on K‐mapping.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 May 2014

Przemyslaw Lech

The purpose of this study is to explore the knowledge management (KM) perspective of information technology (IT) projects based on enterprise system (ES) implementations…

2179

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore the knowledge management (KM) perspective of information technology (IT) projects based on enterprise system (ES) implementations. The study determined what knowledge is needed in each of the project phases (what for, from what sources), how this knowledge is transformed during the project (what knowledge activities are performed concerning this knowledge) and what knowledge-related artifacts are created. A KM framework for ES projects is formulated based upon the results.

Design/methodology/approach

The research has a qualitative exploratory design based on multiple data sources: documentation, semi-structured interviews and participant observation. A coding procedure was applied with the use of a pre-defined list of codes, as derived from KM literature regarding knowledge types, actors, project phases and activities. Open coding was used to determine the role of each type of knowledge in the implementation process.

Findings

The study examined the significance of the particular types of knowledge of each project actor across the project phases, and identified the specific knowledge activities that need to be performed for a successful outcome. In contrast to existing literature, this study also demonstrates that project management knowledge consists of two components: generic and product-related. Meta-knowledge, i.e. knowledge about other people’s knowledge was also identified as critical in the initial phases of the project. Solution knowledge was identified as the primary knowledge product. It is the result of the integration of company and product knowledge and is embedded into the system.

Research limitations/implications

The limitation of this study is that it concentrated on a specific type of the IT project, namely ES implementation. The results cannot be directly extrapolated to other IT projects.

Practical implications

The results of the study may aid in effective staffing for ES implementations and in identifying the necessary knowledge sources. They may also enable the development of relevant KM procedures for a project.

Originality/value

No comprehensive project KM framework for ES has been found in the existing KM literature, and this study fills this gap in the research.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

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