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Article
Publication date: 27 April 2012

Victor Maddalena

This article is a primer which aims to examine the application of project management principles in organizational strategic planning. The intended audience is students in…

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3581

Abstract

Purpose

This article is a primer which aims to examine the application of project management principles in organizational strategic planning. The intended audience is students in health administration and novice leaders in health care.

Design/methodology/approach

A six‐phase project management algorithm is presented to serve as a framework for implementing various aspects of an organization's strategic plan, with a particular emphasis on accountability processes.

Findings

Leaders in healthcare can increase the effectiveness of their organization's strategic planning processes and improve accountability by incorporating basic project management principles during the implementation phase of strategic planning.

Research limitations/implications

This is a review article drawing on a well‐established literature in project management and strategic planning.

Practical implications

The processes associated with generating an organizational strategic plan are well addressed in the management literature. This article succinctly outlines the application of basic project management principles to the implementation of strategic plans and organizational success, focusing on accountability processes.

Social implications

Cost effectiveness of health organizations can be improved by implementing project management practices in strategic planning.

Originality/value

The article succinctly applies basic project management principles to the implementation of strategic plans and organizational success.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

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Book part
Publication date: 28 April 2020

Kelly Guzman

Abstract

Details

Simplifying the Complex
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-972-9

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2021

Okechukwu Bruno-Kizito Nwadigo, Nicola Naismith, Ali GhaffarianHoseini, Amirhosein GhaffarianHoseini and John Tookey

Dynamic planning and scheduling forms a widely adopted smart strategy for solving real-world problems in diverse business systems. This paper uses deductive content…

Abstract

Purpose

Dynamic planning and scheduling forms a widely adopted smart strategy for solving real-world problems in diverse business systems. This paper uses deductive content analysis to explore secondary data from previous studies in dynamic planning and scheduling to draw conclusions on its current status, forward action and research needs in construction management.

Design/methodology/approach

We searched academic databases using planning and scheduling keywords without a periodic setting. This research collected secondary data from the database to draw an objective comparison of categories and conclusions about how the data relates to planning and scheduling to avoid the subjective responses from questionnaires and interviews. Then, applying inclusion and exclusion criteria, we selected one hundred and four articles. Finally, the study used a seven-step deductive content analysis to develop the categorisation matrix and sub-themes for describing the dynamic planning and scheduling categories. We used deductive analysis because of the secondary data and categories comparison. Using the event types represented in a quadrant mapping, we delve into where, when, application and benefits of the classes.

Findings

The content analysis showed that all the accounts and descriptions of dynamic planning and scheduling are identifiable in an extensive research database. The content analysis reveals the need for multi-hybrid (4D BIM-Agent based-discrete event-discrete rate-system dynamics) simulation modelling and optimisation method for proffering solutions to scheduling and planning problems, its current status, tools and obstacles.

Originality/value

This research reveals the deductive content analysis talent in construction research. It also draws direction, focuses and raises a question on dynamic planning and scheduling research concerning the five-integrated model, an opportunity for their integration, models combined attributes and insight into its solution viability in construction.

Details

Smart and Sustainable Built Environment, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6099

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Book part
Publication date: 25 March 2008

Michael D. Mumford, Katrina E. Bedell-Avers and Samuel T. Hunter

Scholars continue to debate whether planning, in fact, contributes to creativity and innovation. In this chapter, we argue that planning is critical to innovation and will…

Abstract

Scholars continue to debate whether planning, in fact, contributes to creativity and innovation. In this chapter, we argue that planning is critical to innovation and will contribute to the generation of viable new ideas. Effective planning, however, must be based on an incremental approach involving a viable portfolio of projects. The implications of this model for the management of innovation at the organizational, group, and individual levels are discussed. Potential new directions for research are considered, along with the model's implications for the management of creative ventures.

Details

Multi-Level Issues in Creativity and Innovation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-553-6

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Book part
Publication date: 1 June 2018

Twila Camp, Barbara Laufersweiler and Sarah Robbins

Pre-project planning can be an important process for libraries managing large project portfolios. The process allows anyone within an organization to put forth a potential…

Abstract

Purpose

Pre-project planning can be an important process for libraries managing large project portfolios. The process allows anyone within an organization to put forth a potential project, and it clearly articulates the process both for developing an idea into a project and for approving and prioritizing projects.

Methodology/approach

Drawing from experience, the authors introduce a preliminary step for proposing projects before the project management principles are applied.

Findings

Benefits of the process include: promoting stakeholder input; preventing organizational overwhelm; documenting the library’s project portfolio; and improving communication, transparency, and decision-making. Libraries implementing this process should define a project for their organization, build buy-in among those involved, and ensure that approved projects advance library goals.

Originality/value

This chapter is largely practical and derived from experience. It provides an in-depth look at pre-project planning, a concept largely ignored in the project management literature.

Details

Project Management in the Library Workplace
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-837-4

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Article
Publication date: 2 March 2010

Nashwan Dawood

The current uptake of 4D planning in industry is slow and there is a need to demonstrate its value over traditional planning technologies. The aim of this research study…

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1491

Abstract

Purpose

The current uptake of 4D planning in industry is slow and there is a need to demonstrate its value over traditional planning technologies. The aim of this research study is to develop a novel approach to establish the value of a 4D tool in the construction industry.

Design/methodology/approach

The exploratory research strategy draws on several social science research methods to collect information from human subjects. This exploratory research work has used literature review, open‐ended questionnaire, surveys, semi‐structured interviews and historical site records. These have been analysed in order to identify, develop and quantify 4D‐based key performance indicators.

Findings

The paper identifies and quantifies 4D‐based key performance indicators. Analysis of the planning efficiency (hit rate percentages) measure on three projects shows that, on an average, a 17 per cent increase in the average industry hit rate was achieved by the use of 4D technology. Also the quantification of communication efficiency measure has shown that on average 30 per cent of meeting time was saved by the use of 4D planning.

Originality/value

The complexity and rapidly paced development of today's projects are challenging the industry to find new innovative approaches to deliver projects. 4D is emerging as a construction‐planning technology to address some of these challenges. 4D planning has the potential to improve visualisation of building design and construction, but its implementation in the industry has yet to reach maturity. This technology enables clients, contractors, planners and sub‐contractors to visualise and understand design and scheduling issues at the early stages of the project.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2006

Ofer Zwikael and Shlomo Globerson

To identify the industry in which projects are best planned and executed and use it as a benchmark for improving project planning in other industries.

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8200

Abstract

Purpose

To identify the industry in which projects are best planned and executed and use it as a benchmark for improving project planning in other industries.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on data collected from 280 project managers, project success and quality of project planning were evaluated and analyzed for four industries – construction and engineering, software and communications, services, and production and maintenance.

Findings

Quality of project planning was found to be the highest in construction and engineering organizations and the lowest in manufacturing organizations. This is a result of a few factors, among them the intensive organizational support which is offered to project managers working in construction and engineering organizations. The other three industries limit their support mostly to tactical aspects, such as the purchasing of project management software. The high quality of project planning in the construction and engineering organizations resulted in their ability to complete projects by almost half the cost and schedule overruns, as compared to organizations belonging to the other industries. Finally, results of the industries in Israel and Japan are compared and analyzed.

Research limitations/implications

Findings are limited to the four industries included in the study.

Practical implications

If organizations, not belonging to the construction industry, wish to improve the probability of success in project planning and execution, they should follow methodologies commonly used in the construction industry.

Originality/value

This paper introduces a valid field study, exploring project management practices in four industries and identifies the one which may be used as a benchmark for the others. It also identifies specific strengths and weaknesses in project management within the explored industries.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 13 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2002

Adel M. Aladwani

In this paper, I examine the mediating effect of project planning on the link between three project uncertainty variables (project size, project diversity, and technical…

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4292

Abstract

In this paper, I examine the mediating effect of project planning on the link between three project uncertainty variables (project size, project diversity, and technical complexity) and IT project success in a developing country. The proposed model is validated using a field survey of 42 IT project leaders from Kuwait. The overall findings give support to the proposed model and to the role of project planning as a mediator between project uncertainty and project success. However, the results challenge the traditional conception by past IT implementation research regarding the direct negative role of uncertainty in IT projects. This finding may be understood in light of the different manifestations that uncertainty may have for IT projects in developing countries. Implications of the findings and directions for future research are discussed.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Article
Publication date: 4 September 2009

Nashwan Dawood and Sushant Sikka

Despite its benefits, the uptake of 4D planning in the construction industry is slow and therefore there is a need to demonstrate its value over traditional planning

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1761

Abstract

Purpose

Despite its benefits, the uptake of 4D planning in the construction industry is slow and therefore there is a need to demonstrate its value over traditional planning technologies. The aim of this paper is to develop a novel approach that demonstrates the value of 4D tools to the construction industry.

Design/methodology/approach

The research strategy utilised draws on several social science research methods. The data collection methods employed included a literature review, an open‐ended questionnaire, surveys, semi‐structured interviews and the analysis of historical site records. The data collected were analysed using qualitative and quantitative techniques in order to identify, develop and quantify 4D‐based key performance indicators.

Findings

This paper identifies and quantifies 4D‐based key performance indicators using case study analysis. In the case studies it was found that, on average, a 17 per cent increase in planning efficiency were achieved by the use of 4D technology, while the communication efficiency measure illustrated that, on average, a 30 per cent reduction in the time used for meetings was achieved by the use of 4D planning.

Practical implications

The complexity and rapid pace of development in today's construction projects are challenging the industry to find new innovative approaches to delivering projects. 4D tools are emerging as a construction planning technology that addresses some of these challenges. 4D planning has the potential to improve the visualisation of building design and construction, but its implementation in the industry has yet to reach maturity.

Originality/value

The paper highlights technology that enables clients, contractors, planners and sub‐contractors to visualise and understand design and scheduling issues at the early stages of a project.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 16 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 October 2009

Ofer Zwikael

The purpose of this paper is to improve construction project planning capabilities. As project management is a core capability in the construction industry, high‐quality…

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7401

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to improve construction project planning capabilities. As project management is a core capability in the construction industry, high‐quality project planning processes are necessary for project success.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper involves data collected from 555 project managers across four industries spanning three different countries. The project planning capabilities of construction project managers are compared with other industrial sectors. In addition, critical project planning processes for the construction industry are identified.

Findings

It is found that, relative to other industrial sectors, organisations belonging to the construction sector obtain a high quality of project planning and the highest success rate. In comparison with other sectors, schedule, quality, and procurement planning are most frequently executed in construction projects. Finally, the impact of the different planning processes on project is success are investigated. The processes that have the greatest impact on project success in the construction sector are “activity definition” and “project plan development.” However, construction project managers do not always invest enough effort in these critical planning processes.

Practical implications

Construction project managers wishing to improve project performance at the planning phase of a project should concentrate more on the accurate identification of all project activities. They should focus on the development of a high‐quality project plan that can be approved by key stakeholders.

Originality/value

This paper identifies the most critical planning processes in construction projects. This represents new information for the construction management body of knowledge.

Details

Construction Innovation, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

Keywords

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