Search results

1 – 10 of over 12000
Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 27 September 2021

Adnan Alghail, Liu Yao, Mohammed Abbas and Yahia Baashar

The reasons behind the project management failure of higher education institutions (HEIs) have been researched for the past few years. One of the reasons is the lack of…

Abstract

Purpose

The reasons behind the project management failure of higher education institutions (HEIs) have been researched for the past few years. One of the reasons is the lack of tools to integrate their knowledge process capabilities (KPC) with their project management (PM) to measure maturity by assessing these capabilities. Various project management maturity (PMM) models exist. Yet, there is a limited number of empirical studies that support the four integrations of KPC and PMM. Therefore, this study aims to propose a new heretical model, namely, KPC-knowledge management (KM) and evaluates a research model that includes the four KPC as an antecedent to PMM.

Design/methodology/approach

The suggested research model is assessed by using partial least squares structural equation modeling. Furthermore, the study's hypotheses were examined based on a sample of 352 respondents from the project management departments in 10 public universities in Yemen.

Findings

Analysis revealed that the derived PMM status could be benchmarked with the project management maturity model. Also, the study found that integrating the KPC into PM enables the institutions to perform critical tasks and value chain activities and enhance the PM maturity level as well. In contrast, if one of the capabilities does not positively impact PMM, it affects the maturity level of the entire project.

Research limitations/implications

The findings are obtained concerning data collected from public universities and represent the Yemeni context, limiting the generalization on a different geographical area. Also, this proposed model can be evaluated in a practical way like conducting a focus group, a set of interviews with specialists, a case study or action research. The qualitative research will help academics to validate our proposal for future research purposes.

Practical implications

The proposed approach may be adapted to the characteristics of organizations involved in projects as external performers (project-based organizations) and not just the HEIs projects. This study provides managers and policymakers with insights into assessing PMM and improving their organizational effectiveness when deciding which KPCs to focus on in the future.

Social implications

This study contributes to the current PM awareness in Yemen and facilitates its success using the knowledge processes capabilities in Yemen's HEIs. It encourages organizations to take this opportunity to revive the projects and achieve a maximum level of maturity.

Originality/value

This study provides new insights into two domains through the link between knowledge management and PM. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this paper is among the first to empirically study the impact of the four KPC toward PMM. It enriches the theoretical perspective of PM. Also, it contributes to the literature on the success factor of KPC, which can be considered to improve organizational performance.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 1 April 2014

Jan Christoph Albrecht and Konrad Spang

The purpose of the research presented in this article is to identify potential influences on an organization-specific “ideal” level of project management maturity by…

Downloads
4936

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the research presented in this article is to identify potential influences on an organization-specific “ideal” level of project management maturity by adopting a qualitative, exploratory approach.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper, the results of a multiple qualitative case study, which has been conducted within industrial enterprises from automotive industry and energy sector, are presented. The research methods applied within the case research are qualitative guided interview, document analysis and standardized interview (maturity questionnaire).

Findings

The interview data reveal that the complexity of the companies' projects might be a determining factor regarding the “ideal” level of maturity. A comparison of the findings of the case research with a secondary literature review on project complexity showed that particularly those facets of project complexity that affect the interaction of the project participants (project team, client, suppliers) seem to require a certain level of maturity.

Originality/value

The idea of an organization-specific “ideal” level of maturity was raised by the developers of project management maturity models (PMMM). It is of interest for professionals due to efficiency reasons. Research literature in the context of PMMM has so far touched on environmental/circumstantial influences on this ideal maturity level only to a slight degree. The results of the qualitative research presented herein mark a contribution to this research gap and allow for quantitative testing.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 1 April 2014

Mark Mullaly

Maturity models have been widely adopted as a popular framework for improvement project management practices. Despite their prevalence, there is still minimal evidence…

Downloads
1831

Abstract

Purpose

Maturity models have been widely adopted as a popular framework for improvement project management practices. Despite their prevalence, there is still minimal evidence that improvements in maturity correspond to improvements in performance or value. This paper aims to explore the challenges faced in applying project management maturity models and offers suggestions for their revision.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper highlights the presumptions in their development and use that are inhibiting relevance of maturity models. Case studies from a major research project explore the relationship between maturity and value. Insights are generated on how project management maturity models need to change in order to become relevant.

Findings

Project management maturity models presume that project management is universal, control oriented and consistent, and that maturity is a linear process. Empirical evidence demonstrates that the practice of project management varies, that different practices result in different value. The paper suggests that a contingent and contextual approach to assessment is required, which maturity models as currently defined may not be able to support.

Research limitations/implications

This is a largely conceptual paper and draws on a limited number of case studies that derived maturity from a comprehensive understanding of project management practices. It is not tied to one specific model, and a model that would address the criticisms discussed here has not been conceived or developed.

Practical implications

This paper will have particular relevance for organizations, who may place excess faith in the rhetoric surrounding maturity models without questioning their underlying relevance or value. It is also of importance to those who develop maturity models and suggests strategies for their significant revision.

Originality/value

This paper takes an important look at whether maturity models actually deliver on their promise and argues that by both design and structure, they are unlikely to do so in their current form.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 1 April 2014

Naomi Brookes, Michael Butler, Prasanta Dey and Robin Clark

– The purpose of the paper was to conduct an empirical investigation to explore the impact of project management maturity models (PMMMs) on improving project performance.

Downloads
3411

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper was to conduct an empirical investigation to explore the impact of project management maturity models (PMMMs) on improving project performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The investigation used a cross-case analysis involving over 90 individuals in seven organisations.

Findings

The findings of the empirical investigation indicate that PMMMs demonstrate very high levels of variability in individual's assessment of project management maturity. Furthermore, at higher levels of maturity, the type of performance improvement adopted following their application is related to the type of PMMM used in the assessment. The paradox of the unreliability of PMMMs and their widespread acceptance is resolved by calling upon the “wisdom of crowds” phenomenon which has implications for the use of maturity model assessments in other arena.

Research limitations/implications

The investigation does have the usual issues associated with case research, but the steps that have been taken in the cross-case construction and analysis have improved the overall robustness and extendibility of the findings.

Practical implications

The tendency for PMMMs to shape improvements based on their own inherent structure needs further understanding.

Originality/value

The use of empirical methods to investigate the link between project maturity models and extant changes in project management performance is highly novel and the findings that result from this have added resonance.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 1 April 2014

Beverly Pasian

The conceptual and modularization of project management maturity models is based on the principle of process control. This research was designed to challenge these…

Downloads
1370

Abstract

Purpose

The conceptual and modularization of project management maturity models is based on the principle of process control. This research was designed to challenge these boundaries to reveal non-process factors. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

A multimethod research design was used with a “qual⇒Qual” sequence. This is a development in MM design theory, with its reliance on an initial qualitative stage that, despite being first, is insufficient to collecting sufficient data to answer the research question. A second stage, involving a more dominant qualitative, is necessary.

Findings

Multiple non-process factors are attributed to a mature project management capability responsible for undefined projects. They include “human factors” such as trust, attitude, motivation and attitude, along with increased customer involvement and a more adaptable organizational environment.

Research limitations/implications

The challenge put forward in this research was for project management maturity theorists to recognize the possibility of finding maturity in a project management capability responsible for undefined projects. This challenge has been met. The focus can now turn to other environments where other project types (undefined or not) are also being managed using processes (and/or practices) that are not necessarily definable, repeatable, predictable and unique to that setting.

Originality/value

An adaptable model has been created that contains multiple factors that can be used in their current relationships or changed to accommodate multiple project and project management scenarios. Further work will create weights for each factor that will further specify the relative value of each, thereby enhancing the adaptable nature of the model.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 22 December 2021

Majid Parchamijalal, Saeed Moradi and Mohsen Zabihi Shirazi

Claim formation is a fact and a regular occurrence in construction industry projects and often leads to a waste of money and time for organizations. Organizations can…

Abstract

Purpose

Claim formation is a fact and a regular occurrence in construction industry projects and often leads to a waste of money and time for organizations. Organizations can, however, reduce and control claims by promoting an integrated claim management system and improving productivity in the results of the claims. Establishing a claim management office is one of the ways to help organizations achieve this.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on library research, expert opinion and analysis of organizations' contracts as case studies and identifying the root causes of the claim, this paper proposes a claim management office maturity model and determines its levels.

Findings

This paper proposes a claim management office maturity model and also determines its levels. The general structure of this model is based on three parameters: “characteristics of each level,” “requirements of each level” and “transition period of each level” in five levels, where the first level is the most basic level and level five is the highest level of the implementation of a claim management office in the organization.

Originality/value

It can be clearly emphasized that this research is one of the first research studies that has dealt with the issue of claim management office in the construction industry and has proposed the model of maturity and development of claim management office in the organization. The use of numerous and experienced experts in achieving the results and case organizations to develop this research has increased the value and credibility of this research. This study also helps to improve the level of claim management in construction industry organizations so that these organizations can implement each level of claim management maturity model in the organization according to their competence and need for claim management. And by implementing it correctly, solve or reduce the problems of claim management in the organization and their projects.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 3 June 2014

Seweryn Spalek

There is a significant knowledge gap in the common understanding regarding the value that investment leading to an increase in project management maturity brings to the…

Downloads
3788

Abstract

Purpose

There is a significant knowledge gap in the common understanding regarding the value that investment leading to an increase in project management maturity brings to the organisation. The purpose of this paper is to narrow this gap by investigating the relationship between an increase in the project management maturity level and the project's performance. Additionally, it advocates the investment roadmap approach.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is part of a worldwide research initiative into maturity in project management covering 447 global companies. For this purpose, survey data from experts from 194 select companies was analysed.

Findings

The cost of forthcoming projects depends on the level of maturity of project management and type of industry.

Research limitations/implications

The study is limited to three different industries (machinery, construction and information technology) and by the method of assessing their future project costs. New research directions are suggested.

Practical implications

The results of the study should help companies in allocating limited resources appropriately using the proposed roadmap.

Social implications

An increase in project management maturity can be achieved through different investment methods. This will benefit society as well.

Originality/value

The paper focuses on global companies dealing in machinery. The area has not been explored sufficiently from the project management perspective. It discusses the relationship between an increase in maturity and future project costs in three industries: machinery, construction and information technology. The paper suggests practical guidelines for project management and sequences in proper investments when resources are limited.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 114 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 1 April 2014

Michael Young, Raymond Young and Julio Romero Zapata

This paper aims to examine the notion of maturity assessment and maturity models more broadly and goes on to examine the findings from the assessments of project

Downloads
2338

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the notion of maturity assessment and maturity models more broadly and goes on to examine the findings from the assessments of project, programme and portfolio maturity undertaken across Australian Government agencies.

Design/methodology/approach

A statistical analysis was performed to determine the level of maturity that best represents the Australian Federal Government agencies as a whole. The unit of analysis in this study is the agencies overall scores in each sub-model across the seven perspectives of the portfolio, programme and project management maturity model (P3M3) maturity model.

Findings

This study has identified a number of interesting findings. First, the practices of project, programme and portfolio across the dataset practiced independently of each other. Second, benefits management and strategy alignment practices are generally poor across Australian Government agencies. Third, programme management practices are the most immature. Finally, the results showed a high sensitivity to the “generic attributes” of roles and responsibilities, experience, capability development, planning and estimating and scrutiny and review.

Research limitations/implications

All data used in this analysis are secondary data collected from individual Australian Government agencies. The data were collected by accredited consultants following a common data collection method and using a standard template to ensure a consistent approach.

Practical implications

The study poses some implications for practice, particularly given the context of Australian Federal Government agencies current plans and action to improve organisational maturity. The study suggests that benefits management processes at the project level and benefits management, governance and stakeholder management processes at the programme level should be an area of focus for improvement.

Originality/value

This study is the first attempt to systematically review the data collected through such an assessment and in particular identify the findings and the implications at a whole of government level.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 30 July 2018

José Crispim, Luiz Henrique Silva and Nazaré Rego

The purpose of this paper is to identify patterns of project risk management (PRM) practices’ adoption, and provides empirical evidence concerning the importance (and key…

Downloads
1922

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify patterns of project risk management (PRM) practices’ adoption, and provides empirical evidence concerning the importance (and key attributes) of organizational PRM maturity to the use of risk-related practices and project performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The research involved two phases: interviews with five project managers, and a worldwide survey of project managers that resulted in the analysis of 865 valid questionnaire responses. Cluster analysis was used to classify PRM practices’ use, factor analysis to detect the structure of the relationship between the variables measuring PRM practices’ use and a multiple regression analysis (with canonical correlation) to further reveal the different degrees to which PRM practices and organizational maturity are associated.

Findings

The identified patterns of risk practices’ adoption indicate that different contexts of organization PRM maturity and project complexity influence practices selection. The PRM practices related with targets (e.g. time-phased budget plan) are the most used, and those related to tools and techniques (e.g. S-curve) are the least used. Additionally, the obtained results confirm that organizational PRM maturity influences risk practices’ usage, moderated by project complexity, and organizational PRM maturity influences project performance.

Originality/value

Empirical methods were used to investigate the relationship between organizational PRM maturity and a large set of PRM practices with project complexity as a moderator. Gaps in the use of PRM practices (i.e. areas where more PRM knowledge and training are needed) were identified. Finally, this work identifies the attributes of organizational maturity with implications in practices’ usage and project performance.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 7 April 2015

Fredrik Backlund, Diana Chronéer and Erik Sundqvist

– The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the empirical research on project management (PM) maturity assessments, specifically based on a maturity model.

Downloads
2088

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the empirical research on project management (PM) maturity assessments, specifically based on a maturity model.

Design/methodology/approach

The empirical data are based on a case study including in-depth interviews with a semi-structured approach, followed by a focus group interview. A survey was distributed within a project-based organisation (PBO) and to client and stakeholder representatives, and then analysed. The organisation in the case study is a project department within a Swedish mining company.

Findings

Careful considerations are needed when choosing a PM maturity model (PM3) as the model structure can influence the assessment’s focus. It is also important to include both internal and external project stakeholders in the assessment to achieve an efficiency and effectiveness perspective when analysing PM capabilities. Valid information from an assessment is crucial, therefore, clear communication from management is important in order to motivate the participants in the assessment.

Research limitations/implications

Improved understanding for implementing and applying a PM3 contributes to the increased knowledge of drivers, enablers and obstacles when assessing PM maturity, which also creates a basis for further research initiatives.

Practical implications

An increased knowledge of drivers, enablers and obstacles should be valuable for practitioners introducing and applying a PM3.

Social implications

Projects are a common way of working in many businesses. Activities which aim to improve PM capabilities should contribute to more effective and efficient project performance.

Originality/value

This case study gives an in-depth insight into the implementation of a PM3 within a PBO. Through conducting a literature review, it was found that this type of empirical research is rare.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 12000