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Article

Elizabeth Barber and James Warn

To demonstrate two distinct leadership requirements for project managers and establish a theoretical basis for distinguishing between these two types of leadership.

Abstract

Purpose

To demonstrate two distinct leadership requirements for project managers and establish a theoretical basis for distinguishing between these two types of leadership.

Design/methodology/approach

A framework linking transactional and transformational leadership qualities with project management attributes is developed.

Findings

Explains how reactive decisions relating to monitoring of schedules and budgeting data of projects has received the greatest attention in the literature but this is only one aspect of project control. Project leadership that is proactive in controlling projects is more effective.

Research limitations/implications

The implications of our findings are substantive. Project managers who focus on proactive leadership behaviour will be more successful in completing projects on time, on budget and to the specified standard as well as achieving the strategic purpose of the project.

Practical implications

Project managers need to pay more attention to the progress of their projects and forestall any problems rather than just being reactive problem solvers.

Originality/value

The paper provides a framework for establishing the linkage between proactive decisions that impact on the direction that the project is progressing and reactive decisions that solve the existing problems of project management. It is a different focus to the traditional project management leadership knowledge base.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 43 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article

Paul H. Jacques, John Garger and Michael Thomas

The purpose of this research was to explore the leadership style of graduate project management students vs other MBA students.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research was to explore the leadership style of graduate project management students vs other MBA students.

Design/methodology/approach

Graduate project management and MBA students attending a regional comprehensive university in USA returned surveys that assess their leadership style emphasis of concern for task or concern for people.

Findings

Project management students rate themselves significantly higher on the concern for people leadership style and were found to have a balance between the concern for task and concern for people leadership style vs MBA students.

Practical implications

Individuals exhibiting a concern for people leadership style and those with a balance between concern for task and concern for people leadership styles are good candidates for project management positions as well as training/education in project management.

Originality/value

The paper shows that the selection and training of project managers based on bahavioral tendencies can relate to project success.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article

Prudence A. Clarke

The purpose of this paper is to raise awareness of the need to understand the differences between management and leadership within the project environment.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to raise awareness of the need to understand the differences between management and leadership within the project environment.

Design/methodology/approach

First stage research involved data analysis from forum, workshops, group to one, one to one interviews. Second stage research involves a five‐year PhD study undertaken by the author.

Findings

The paper highlights the need not only to understand the difference between project management and leadership, but also to use this differentiation in the identification, assessment and development of project services providers and as an integral part of organisational and people development for all companies involved in sponsoring, supporting or delivering projects.

Practical implications

The premise is that the emphasis needs to be on project leadership to achieve a successful project

Originality/value

The paper includes research within a specific industry based on identification of a market niche.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 41 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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Article

Junwei Zheng, Xueqin Gou, Guangdong Wu, Xianbo Zhao, Hongyang Li and Bingsheng Liu

This study investigated the differential effects of empowering leadership and directive leadership in projects. Moreover, how the complex interplay between empowering and…

Abstract

Purpose

This study investigated the differential effects of empowering leadership and directive leadership in projects. Moreover, how the complex interplay between empowering and directive leadership styles influences both leader–member exchange and project performance was also explored.

Design/methodology/approach

Polynomial regression analysis and response surface modeling were applied to analyze 161 matched data collected from project members and managers worked in different projects located in China.

Findings

Four leadership styles were identified, i.e. ambidextrous, delegating, directive and laissez-faire styles. These may be combined with empowering and directive leadership. With regard to (in)congruence, leader–member exchange and project performance improved with ambidextrous style as a form of high–high congruence between empowering and directive leadership compared with laissez-faire style (i.e. low–low congruence). Results were better when a delegating style was combined with empowering leadership at a high level compared with the combination of directive style as directive leadership at a high level. Leader–member exchange was identified to exert a mediating role of the (in)congruence on project performance.

Originality/value

This study confirmed the contingent viewpoint of leadership by identifying distinct leadership styles applied in projects. Furthermore, the co-existence of empowering leadership and directive leadership was examined, and the underlying mechanism between the (in)congruence of empowering and directive leadership and project performance was identified.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 42 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article

Riaz Ahmed, Simon P. Philbin and Farooq-e-Azam Cheema

Over the last few decades, a large number of research studies have been carried out on project manager's leadership competencies. However, systematic literature reviews…

Abstract

Purpose

Over the last few decades, a large number of research studies have been carried out on project manager's leadership competencies. However, systematic literature reviews are still scarce in the project management literature. Therefore, the purpose of this article is to conduct a systematic literature review on project manager's leadership competencies based on published empirical research studies.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors employed a systematic literature review (SLR) methodology to synthesize research in a rigorous manner and a total of 1,780 articles were identified in the first step and a final sample of 60 research studies were synthesized.

Findings

Synthesis of the findings in this SLR on project manager's leadership competencies revealed: (a) there is a lack of categorization or ranking of leadership competencies; (b) 20 research studies (46%) were conducted with sample sizes of less than 100; (c) only a few research studies (<10%) used interview data for analysis; and (d) none of the research studies reported adoption of a triangulation method.

Research limitations/implications

This study synthesized clusters of leadership competencies and prioritized project manager's leadership competencies as “high priority”, “moderate priority” and “low priority”. We recommend a sample size between 200 and 300 to produce sophisticated results and enhance the credibility, generalizability and validity of clusters and priorities of project manager's leadership competencies through future research.

Originality/value

Future research studies are suggested to consider systematic literature review combined with face-to-face and group interview in addition to employing triangulation methods. Besides highlighting implications for practitioners, this SLR has advanced the understanding of how to conduct systematic literature reviews in a robust manner.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

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Article

Mudassar Ali, Zhang Li, Salim Khan, Syed Jamal Shah and Rizwan Ullah

This paper aims to examine the impact of humble leadership on project success. The authors propose that such an effect is mediated by team-building, and top management…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the impact of humble leadership on project success. The authors propose that such an effect is mediated by team-building, and top management support moderates the direct relationship (humble leadership and project success) as well as an indirect relationship through team-building.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 337 individuals employed in the information technology sector of Pakistan. A two-step approach consisting confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modeling was used for analysis. To examine conditional direct and indirect effects, the authors utilized model 8 in PROCESS.

Findings

The results showed that humble leadership is positively related to project success. Furthermore, team-building partially mediates the relationship between humble leadership and project success. Moreover, top management support was anticipated to have a moderating effect on the direct and indirect link (via team-building) between humble leadership and project success.

Originality/value

Drawing on the conservation of resources theory, this study found that how humble leadership is vital for project success, and thus, extends the utility of the concept of humble leadership to the project literature.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

Keywords

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Article

Ahmed Bilal, Ahmad Siddiquei, Muhammad Ali Asadullah, Hayat Muhammad Awan and Fahad Asmi

Servant leadership is a new follower-centric style of leadership. The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of the project leaders’ servant leadership style on…

Abstract

Purpose

Servant leadership is a new follower-centric style of leadership. The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of the project leaders’ servant leadership style on project team effectiveness via team goal clarity and team process clarity within the project-based organizational context.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 58 teams working in 3 project-based organizations participated in the survey study. Team members rated their project leaders’ servant leadership style, team goal clarity and team process clarity in the project, while leaders evaluated team effectiveness. Hypotheses were tested using multi-level structural equation modeling.

Findings

Results suggested that servant leadership had a positive and significant impact on project team effectiveness via team goal clarity and team process clarity.

Originality/value

The study examined the influence of servant leadership as a team leadership approach within a project context. As a multi-level design, the study also identified the team-specific mechanisms (team goal clarity and team process clarity), which could help accomplish team effectiveness.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

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Article

Haoran Li, Zhenzhi Zhao, Ralf Müller and Jingting Shao

Followership is the free will recognition of leadership in the commitment toward realization of the collectively adopted organization vision and culture. The purpose of…

Abstract

Purpose

Followership is the free will recognition of leadership in the commitment toward realization of the collectively adopted organization vision and culture. The purpose of this paper is to identify the relationship between project managers’ leadership and their followership. Most project managers are both leaders and followers at the same time, but research typically investigates only their leadership. This ignores followership as an important aspect in understanding and predicting behavior, and further in the selection of project managers.

Design/methodology/approach

The method used for this paper is the explanatory in nature and a deductive approach, within which the above research hypothesis is tested through quantitative techniques. Data are collected through a nation-wide survey in China. Data analysis was done through factor analysis, canonical correlation analysis and multiple regression analysis.

Findings

The results show that transformational leadership is positively correlated with transformational followership and transactional followership, and that transactional leadership is negatively correlated with transactional followership.

Research limitations/implications

The paper supports a deeper investigation into leadership and followership theories. A model for both leadership and followership is developed. The findings from this paper will guide organizations to choose the project managers.

Originality/value

The originality lies in the new way to examine the relationship between leadership and followership. It is the first study on the relationship of project managers. Its value is new insights, which introduced a new perspective to understand leadership and followership.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

Keywords

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Article

Bart A.G. Bossink

This article presents four basic innovation leadership styles: charismatic, instrumental, strategic and interactive innovation leadership. The leadership styles and their…

Abstract

This article presents four basic innovation leadership styles: charismatic, instrumental, strategic and interactive innovation leadership. The leadership styles and their characteristsics relate to process and product innovations in construction projects. A theoretical framework – which synthesizes these relations – enables explorative research into the effects of leadership on organizational innovativeness. Four case studies, observing the same manager in four comparable projects, explore the effects of each leadership style on a construction project’s innovativeness in ecological terms. On an analytical level the case study explorations indicate that a manager’s consistent performance of a leadership style stimulates the project’s ecological innovativeness when the manager also injects the project with ecological information, knowledge and competence. It also indicates that a manager’s consistent performance of a leadership style, without an injection of information, knowledge and competence in the project, does not stimulate the project’s ecological innovativeness.

Details

Construction Innovation, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

Keywords

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Article

Umer Zaman, Shahid Nawaz, Sidra Tariq and Asad Afzal Humayoun

Transformational leadership, flexibility and visibility improves project responsiveness to highly unpredictable and impactful events referred as the ‘black swans’ in mega…

Abstract

Purpose

Transformational leadership, flexibility and visibility improves project responsiveness to highly unpredictable and impactful events referred as the ‘black swans’ in mega projects (Bloch et al., 2012; Raziq et al., 2018; Zailani et al., 2016). However, these concepts have never been empirically tested in a single framework to determine their significant impact on multi-dimensional project success. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the interactional effects of project flexibility and project visibility on the relationship between transformational leadership and “multi-dimensions” of project success including meeting design goals; impact on customers and benefits to project-based organization.

Design/methodology/approach

Empirical data derived from cross-sectional survey of 160 project managers from telecom intensive companies in Pakistan were used to test the conceptual framework developed from recent literature. Partial least squares-structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM) provided detailed analysis of the measurement and structural model. The most recent reflective–formative PLS-SEM approach for higher-order constructs has been introduced.

Findings

The results indicate that project managers’ transformational leadership (β = 0.348, p < 0.01), project flexibility (β = 0.221, p < 0.01) and project visibility (β = 0.366, p < 0.01) are positively related with the multi-dimensional project success (second-order formative) construct. Interestingly, the relationship between transformational leadership and project success is influenced by significantly negative moderations established through project flexibility (β = −0.100, p < 0.01) and project visibility (β = −0.093, p < 0.05).

Research limitations/implications

This study in the telecom sector examined the interactional effects of risk mitigating strategies (i.e. project flexibility and project visibility) on the relationship between transformational leadership and multi-dimensional project success. This study creates a basis for future investigations extending to various project types and relevant to different industries especially those involving higher-order (formative) assessments of project success.

Practical implications

The study findings assist project leaders to meet their escalating commitments in achieving project success from a multi-dimensional standpoint. Additionally, this study underscores a renewed perspective of transformational leadership and project outcomes. Despite prevailing understanding developed through prior research, transformational leadership may become less favorable for project success in conditions of increased flexibility and visibility in projects.

Originality/value

Earlier studies have overlooked the multi-dimensional nature of project success (second-order formative) construct, despite several attempts to examine the interplay between transformational leadership and project success. Based on the knowledge gap and non-existence of empirical evidence, the authors introduced and empirically tested the moderating role of project flexibility and project visibility in the relationship between transformational leadership and multi-dimensional project success.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

Keywords

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