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Article
Publication date: 12 October 2018

Progress Choongo, Leo Jasper Paas, Enno Masurel, Elco van Burg and John Lungu

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between entrepreneurs’ personal values and corporate social responsibility (CSR) orientations among small- and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between entrepreneurs’ personal values and corporate social responsibility (CSR) orientations among small- and medium-sized enterprises in a developing country, Zambia.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected through questionnaires. Two linear regression models were used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

Self-transcendence values have a significant positive influence on socially oriented CSR but do not influence environmentally oriented CSR. Self-enhancement values do not affect social and environmental CSR orientations. Conservation values have a marginally positive influence on environmentally oriented CSR but no influence on socially oriented CSR. Finally, openness to change has a significant positive influence on environmentally orientated CSR but no influence on socially oriented CSR.

Research limitations/implications

The limitations of this study relates to the sector from which the sample was drawn, other predictors of CSR orientations, use of cross-sectional data, and the replication of this study to validate its findings.

Practical implications

The findings inform policy-makers, scholars, educators, and regulators on the importance of aligning personal values with environmental and social concerns, thereby influencing entrepreneurs’ CSR orientations for the well-being of society and the natural environment.

Originality/value

This paper shows the influence of personal values on CSR orientations among entrepreneurs in a hardly researched Sub-Saharan Africa country.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 28 May 2020

Emiel L. Eijdenberg and Neil Thompson

Abstract

Details

Entrepreneurs’ Creative Responses to Institutional Challenges
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-542-9

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 28 May 2020

Emiel L. Eijdenberg and Neil Thompson

Abstract

Details

Entrepreneurs’ Creative Responses to Institutional Challenges
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-542-9

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2018

Joseph Dery Nyeadi, Muazu Ibrahim and Yakubu Awudu Sare

The paper aims to investigate empirically the impact of corporate social responsibility (CSR) on financial performance in South African listed firms.

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to investigate empirically the impact of corporate social responsibility (CSR) on financial performance in South African listed firms.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses panel corrected standard errors to estimate the effect of CSR on firm financial performance and thus addresses contemporaneous cross-correlations across the panel cross sections. The study uses a broad base measure of CSR created by the Public Investment Corporation data set and the combination of accounting and economic means of measuring firm financial performance.

Findings

CSR is found to have a strong positive impact on firm financial performance in South Africa. When CSR is decomposed further into its major components, governance performance positively impacts a firm’s financial performance with no evidence of any relationship between social components and firm performance and between environmental components and firm performance. The positive impact of CSR on firm performance is greater in big firms. At the industry level, CSR is noticed to impact positively on financial performance in the extractive industry via good governance and responsible environmental behaviors. It however has no impact on firm performance in the financial sector.

Research limitations/implications

The results should be interpreted with caution and some limitations. Due to the limiting nature of the Public Investment Corporation data set (the survey was carried out on selected firms on the Johannesburg Stock Exchange for three years spanning from 2011 to 2013). This resulted in a sample of 56 firms. It is therefore very problematic to generalize the findings to a larger population over a long period of time. This is more limiting especially on individual sector studies where the sample has further shrunk to a smaller sample. As a result of the smaller sample size, the authors were unable to explore some other sectors which could have given more revealing findings. The authors recommend that future research should explore other data sets or use primary data approach that can allow for more sample size and elongated time period for a more holistic view and for easy generalization of the findings. The authors also identify an important lacuna necessitating further research effort. It would be interesting to empirically examine the threshold point of firms’ size beyond which CSR damages firms’ performance. Knowledge of this will guide managers of firms in their strategic CSR decision.

Practical implications

This study does not only serve as a reference work for subsequent investigations into the impact of CSR on firm performance in sub-Saharan Africa but also serves as a guide to policymakers on the financial impact of CSR adoption.

Originality/value

This study is one of the pioneering works that comprehensively examines the effect of CSR on financial performance amongst South African firms via size and sector and also controls for contemporaneous cross-correlation effects from the firms in the panel set.

Details

Journal of Global Responsibility, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2041-2568

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2018

Emiel L. Eijdenberg, Deo Sabokwigina and Enno Masurel

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the extent to which performance and environmental sustainability orientations (ESOs) are developed, as well as their…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the extent to which performance and environmental sustainability orientations (ESOs) are developed, as well as their association, in a typical impoverished community: the informal economy of an African least developed country (LDC).

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a literature review and a pre-study on the spot, a questionnaire was developed before being completed by 140 informal food vendors – that is, “subsistence entrepreneurs” – in Tanzania. t-Tests, correlation analyses and regression analyses were carried out to approach the formulated hypotheses.

Findings

The results showed that a significant distinction can be made between basic and advanced performance. In addition, the respondents showed significantly higher levels of awareness of ESO practices that are intangible and are not fully within their control than the so-called personal tangible ESO practices. However, performance was minimally affected by ESOs.

Originality/value

While firm performance and environmental sustainability have been shortlisted on agendas outside academia (e.g. international development organisations) as a means to develop LDCs, the scientific community is lagging behind with regard to these two. This paper is one step forward in unravelling how performance and ESOs occur in LDCs.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

The Entrepreneurial Dilemma in the Life Cycle of the Small Firm
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-315-0

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Abstract

Details

Entrepreneurs’ Creative Responses to Institutional Challenges
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-542-9

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Article
Publication date: 19 November 2019

Muhammad Ikram, Robert Sroufe, Muhammad Mohsin, Yasir Ahmed Solangi, Syed Zulfiqar Ali Shah and Farrukh Shahzad

This study aims to examine whether corporate social responsibility (CSR) activities influence firm performance based on a longitudinal survey for small and medium-sized…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine whether corporate social responsibility (CSR) activities influence firm performance based on a longitudinal survey for small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in Pakistan. Empirical studies suggest that the SME sector plays an essential role in the economic development of Pakistan and can be considered the backbone of the economy.

Design/methodology/approach

The data for this study were collected from SMEs located in the cities of Karachi, Lahore and Faisalabad in Pakistan. A well-designed questionnaire was administrated over 240 entrepreneurs to analyze and measure the impact of CSR on financial performance for a 12-month period. The authors used econometric analysis of the data using structural equation modeling.

Findings

Results reveal significant relationships between CSR and two determinants of firm performance, namely, employee commitment and corporate reputation.

Research limitations/implications

Findings of the study are important for policymakers, entrepreneurs and other professionals in SMEs sectors both in under-developed and, with further application and exploration, in developing countries.

Originality/value

There is no single longitudinal study prior to this has been carried out on the relationships of CSR and firm performance in the SME sector in the context of the Pakistani economy. Hence, this study significantly fills an important gap in the research.

Details

Journal of Global Responsibility, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2041-2568

Keywords

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