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Book part
Publication date: 1 May 2019

Oluseun Olubajo, Will Hughes and Libby Schweber

The purpose of the study is to explore the dominant ideas in research on the management of time in construction. The focus of research has been to improve techniques for…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the study is to explore the dominant ideas in research on the management of time in construction. The focus of research has been to improve techniques for optimising the timing and sequence of activities.

Design/Methodology/Approach

A critical review of research on construction time management, challenging the typical focus. We examine the assumptions different authors make, underline the limitations of the dominant research approaches and examine the prospects for developing a new approach to researching these issues.

Findings

The dominant approach in literature focuses on unique activity traits in construction planning and measurable patterns between time-related variables. This assumes that time in construction can be managed by changing the way activities are calculated. These approaches have not been correlated with improvement in performance. Social practice theory may help to explain how programmes figure as one of many objects used during construction.

Research Limitations/Implications

The focus is on reviewing indicative literature from key journals in construction management. The implication is that research is needed about how such documents are used in practice, which goes further than optimising plans in theory.

Practical Implications

Future research could focus on understanding the context of construction planning practice and shift the debate from a focus on optimisation to practice.

Originality/Value

An interpretivist approach with a focus on how tools such as planning documents are used on site. Social practice theory may provide a clearer explanation of the place of construction planning within the practice of construction management. This could provide solutions that deal effectively with stakeholder expectations around timely completion of construction projects.

Details

10th Nordic Conference on Construction Economics and Organization
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-051-1

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Book part
Publication date: 25 September 2020

Morag Redford

This chapter critically examines the provision and underlying partnership structure of a range of online and distance teacher preparation courses introduced in Scotland…

Abstract

This chapter critically examines the provision and underlying partnership structure of a range of online and distance teacher preparation courses introduced in Scotland from 2014 to 2018. These courses reflect a period of teacher shortages and were developed by Universities in partnership with local authority employers, particularly in rural areas. This chapter explores the geographic and policy context before analysing the national and local policy drivers that led to the expansion of online and distance provision. The structures of a range of programmes introduced by the University of the Highlands and Islands, the University of Aberdeen and the University of Dundee are considered in detail. This is reflected against the national policy drivers of teacher shortages in rural areas, the challenges of recruiting secondary science and technology teachers and the introduction of national funding from the Scottish Government for ‘New Routes into Teaching’. The Government aim of recruiting highly qualified graduates into teaching as a career is contrasted with the local requirement to support a wider more equitable access to a teaching career, for people already committed to living in rural Scotland. This chapter concludes with an analysis of the processes and technology utilised in these programmes before considering the future of online and distance teacher preparation in Scotland.

Details

Teacher Preparation in Scotland
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-480-4

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Article
Publication date: 11 July 2008

R.A. Alani and Gboyega Ilusanya

In response to the challenges of enhancing quality, the agency of government which is responsible for coordinating university education in Nigeria, the National…

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1229

Abstract

Purpose

In response to the challenges of enhancing quality, the agency of government which is responsible for coordinating university education in Nigeria, the National Universities Commission, evolved a system of academic programme accreditation in 1991 to ensure conformity with minimum standards and to promote quality. The purpose of this paper is to examine the outcomes of some of those accreditation exercises and how they have influenced the quality of and access to university education.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper analyses secondary source data from accreditation reports of 1999, mop up exercises and accreditation re‐visitation of 2000‐2005 and that of November 2005.

Findings

The mean percentage of programmes with full accreditation status was found to have increased from 12.6 in 1999 to 48.5 in 2005, that of programmes which got interim accreditation decreased from 72.66 in 1999 to 48.30 in 2005, while the one for programmes which were denied accreditation decreased from 17.9 in 1999 to 9.5 in 2005. Federal universities had more programmes with full accreditation and less programmes with denied accreditation status. State universities had less number of programmes with full accreditation and higher number with denied accreditation status. Generally, the results showed that accreditation status of most academic programmes improved in subsequent accreditation exercises, meaning that the deficiencies noticed were remedied. The programmes that were denied accreditation caused a reduction in the number of vacancies for student admission.

Research limitations/implications

The paper focuses on federal and state universities only. Private universities are excluded.

Practical implications

The paper suggests that the universities in Nigeria should be closely monitored for their academic programmes to scale the accreditation hurdle.

Originality/value

The paper shows that accreditation of academic programmes helps to improve the quality of university education.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1998

Kemal Birdir and Thomas E. Pearson

An in‐depth analysis of hospitality certification programmes was conducted. The study revealed important insights on certification demographics, development processes…

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817

Abstract

An in‐depth analysis of hospitality certification programmes was conducted. The study revealed important insights on certification demographics, development processes, certification paths, administration, benefits of certification, credibility and the future of certification programmes. It is found that developing certification programmes commonly involves a long and detailed process. There are serious obstacles in getting association membership to adopt certification programmes. Associations prefer to develop, and manage their certification programmes. Certification programmes seem to benefit both associations and members.

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International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 3 June 2014

Jamal Mattar Alsalmi, Chern Li Liew and Brenda Chawner

The purpose of this paper is to present the findings from research that explored the influence of contextual factors on the adoption and development of Electronic Theses…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present the findings from research that explored the influence of contextual factors on the adoption and development of Electronic Theses and Dissertation (ETD) programmes in the Arab Gulf States.

Design/methodology/approach

Semi-structured interviews were conducted with representatives of five groups of stakeholders with an interest in the implementation of ETD programmes. The groups were postgraduate students, academic staff, library managers, system administrators, and postgraduate officers from five Gulf States universities. In addition, an online survey was conducted with 309 participants in order to test and explore, in a larger sample, the issues identified in the interviews.

Findings

Research participants identified three levels of factors; contextual, institutional, and personal. In addition, they highlighted that contextual factors have an influence on institutional factors. These contextual factors include misunderstanding of plagiarism, strong economy, recencey of research programmes, and younger societies. For example, due to the recencey of postgraduate programmes in the Arab Gulf States, some of the theses and dissertations are low in quality and quantity. The Arab Gulf States have strong economies and this helped to provide the necessary technological infrastructure needed for adopting ETD programmes. Since the Gulf societies are quite young they are more likely to adopt new technologies. In addition, people at these states appear to have a weak understanding of plagiarism issues and thus they have more concerns about these issues.

Originality/value

This paper provides insights about the factors influencing the adoption and development of ETD programmes in the Arab Gulf States.

Details

Library Management, vol. 35 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1989

Henry C. Culley

The difficulty of getting busy executives to focus their attentionduring management and executive development programmes is discussed. Theexperience of programmes

Abstract

The difficulty of getting busy executives to focus their attention during management and executive development programmes is discussed. The experience of programmes conducted at the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) from 1986 to 1988 is built on. A set of behaviours and attitudes is identified which blocks and creates resistance to learning in programme sessions. To deal with these attitudes and behaviours, a general principle can be useful in programme design: a development programme has to provide a level of stimulation and learning equal to or greater than the experience one is getting in the workplace or from work. Analysis of programme evaluations and follow‐up discussion with participants reveal that three factors can be used to overcome resistance to management development and significantly influence overall programme performance, and these are described and discussed.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 8 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 25 September 2009

Margaret Tynan, Dennis Thomas, Margaret Durand, Bill O'Gorman and Nerys Fuller‐Love

The purpose of this paper is to outline the authors' experiences of designing and implementing an enterprise development programme for female entrepreneurs. The programme

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533

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to outline the authors' experiences of designing and implementing an enterprise development programme for female entrepreneurs. The programme targets those women who already have a business and wish to grow it further.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper describes the motivation for the programme and the range of issues which is encountered in its design and delivery. It concludes with a brief assessment of lessons learned.

Findings

In addition to the importance of design and focus, the experiences of the Female Entrepreneurship Ireland‐Wales (FEIW) project indicate the need for appropriate programme presentation and marketing; networking and mentoring aspects are also hightlighted.

Research limitations/implications

As this is a pilot project with flexibility to adapt to the needs of the participants, it is not possible to apply a robust evaluative framework, although such a framework will need to be developed in due course. That said, the qualitative data collected pre‐, during and post‐programme delivery offer valuable insights to the needs of female entrepreneurs; this learning may be incorporated into the design of future programmes.

Practical implications

The FEIW programme is essentially a pilot initiative and is delivered in only two regions. Thus, it is difficult to generalise findings.

Originality/value

As a case study, the experiences of the FEIW project contribute valuable empirical evidence regarding the design and implementation of an enterprise programme for female entrepreneurs.

Details

International Journal of Gender and Entrepreneurship, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-6266

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1965

R. BAILEY

It is more than a decade since Skinner's first publication on programmed instruction. In the interim period American schools and colleges have adopted the technique with…

Abstract

It is more than a decade since Skinner's first publication on programmed instruction. In the interim period American schools and colleges have adopted the technique with characteristic enthusiasm and vigour, whilst in the USSR there has been a similar ready realisation of its educational value at many levels of teaching.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 7 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 4 September 2009

Lindsay Ryan

The purpose of this paper is to explore why corporations are forming corporate education partnerships with universities and the role of corporate education programmes.

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1563

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore why corporations are forming corporate education partnerships with universities and the role of corporate education programmes.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents the findings from quantitative research involving 79 senior managers from North America, the UK, and Australia responsible for the management of their university‐corporate education partnerships.

Findings

The research finds that the primary reason for establishing university‐corporate education partnerships is to provide a recognised university award programme to complement an organisation's in‐house education programmes. Also, by aligning with a university an organisation is able to add strength and credibility to its in‐house corporate education programmes.

Originality/value

The research provides an insight into the growing role of university‐corporate education partnerships and helps to quantify some emerging aspects of these partnerships.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 47 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 14 June 2011

Piyali Ghosh, Jagdamba Prasad Joshi, Rachita Satyawadi, Udita Mukherjee and Rashmi Ranjan

This paper aims to deal with evaluation of different parameters of an induction programme conducted by a transmission and distribution major in India. The study aims to

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14020

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to deal with evaluation of different parameters of an induction programme conducted by a transmission and distribution major in India. The study aims to indicate which aspects of the training programme need to be emphasised when devising induction programmes for managers and non‐managers, and to ascertain whether there is any significant difference in their reactions.

Design/methodology/approach

Evaluation has been done with the help of trainee reaction measured by a questionnaire. The statistical tools used include factor analysis to generate factors that influence trainee satisfaction and a t‐test to test the hypothesis that there will be a significant difference between managerial and non‐managerial levels in their satisfaction with different aspects of the programme.

Findings

Factor analysis generated six factors, namely clarity of trainer, other facilities, venue of the programme, food served, practical application, and communication of trainer. The t‐test run on these factors shows a significant difference in means for only one factor, namely communication of trainer, which implies that managers could relate better to the trainer, given their intellectual superiority.

Research limitations/implications

A larger sample size covering more units of the organisation would help in generalising the findings.

Practical implications

The findings could help in developing an induction programme customised to meeting the needs of managers and non‐managers.

Originality/value

Practitioners may use this paper to plan a common orientation programme for the healthy integration of managers and non‐managers and to ensure that there is a minimal gap between the satisfaction levels of the two groups.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 43 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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