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Article
Publication date: 19 June 2017

Siong Choy Chong and Usman Olakunle Balogun

This paper aims to describe the development and prospects of an Islamic finance professional programme structure (IFPPS).

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to describe the development and prospects of an Islamic finance professional programme structure (IFPPS).

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is conceptual in nature. It begins with a review of issues leading to the development of IFPPS by the Finance Accreditation Agency (FAA). The process of developing the IFPPS is then delineated, followed by discussions on its intended benefits, the challenges encountered, as well as ways the issues and challenges can be addressed.

Findings

The benefits of IFPPS to different stakeholders are highlighted, with consideration given to its strategic roles in addressing the issues and challenges put forth.

Research limitations/implications

Because this paper focuses on the conceptual development of IFPPS, its actual application will further reinforce its value. The outcomes will be presented in the form of case studies in a subsequent publication to contribute to theory and practice.

Practical implications

Having a knowledgeable and skilled workforce through continuous learning and development is key to sustaining the growth of the Islamic financial services industry (IFSI). One possible way is through the adoption of a unified structure, such as the IFPPS which links quality learning to competencies of IFSI practitioners. In addition, the IFPPS possess characteristics which could potentially serve to facilitate the development of sectorial-based national qualifications framework for Islamic finance, making harmonisation in terms of the design, development, delivery and assessment of different learning programmes and qualifications possible.

Originality/value

A uniformed structure that guides learning and development of practitioner-based Islamic finance programmes is long overdue. With the rapid growth of the IFSI, coupled with the concomitant need for a competent workforce to meet business requirements, the time has come for the development of the IFPPS for the IFSI. The development of IFPPS represents the first of its kind for the IFSI. Once the professional qualifications standards are fully developed and implemented, it is expected to bring enormous benefits to different stakeholders involved in Islamic finance learning and practice.

Details

International Journal of Islamic and Middle Eastern Finance and Management, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8394

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Laurie Lomas

This paper reviews recent research, literature and the views of a small sample of senior managers and academics in English higher education institutions on the challenges…

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Abstract

This paper reviews recent research, literature and the views of a small sample of senior managers and academics in English higher education institutions on the challenges associated with embedding quality. When implemented by a university, quality enhancement models such as total quality management and the European Foundation for Quality Management need to be fitted in sympathetically with the organisation's culture and structures. If embedding is to occur, there needs to be a careful consideration of the opportunity costs of the various options that could bring about the necessary transformative change. The importance of transformative leadership and the creation of a conducive organisational culture are also explored, as are the major indicators of success. Senior managers and other change agents face major challenges but, by achieving the goal of embedding quality, students would receive greatly improved higher education and, as a consequence, their country's economy and society would also prosper.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 June 2012

Benjamin Kutsyuruba

The purpose of this exploratory article is to address the questions of teacher attrition and retention by examining the policies supporting beginning teachers in different…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this exploratory article is to address the questions of teacher attrition and retention by examining the policies supporting beginning teachers in different jurisdictions (provinces and territories) in Canada through teacher induction and mentorship programs.

Design/methodology/approach

This research study relied on the collection of documents as the primary method of data collection. Both policy documents as means of external communication and the informal responses to formal policies by various stakeholders were analyzed in a complementary fashion in this study. The study examined numerous government documents, websites, program/policy memoranda, newsletters, as well as academic reviews pertaining to beginning teacher induction programs across Canada.

Findings

Data analysis revealed significant policy variability across the provinces and localities, with comprehensive induction programs instituted only by the educational authorities in New Brunswick, Ontario, and Northwest Territories. A fundamental building‐block of the induction programs was the creation of a formal mentoring program that matched experienced teachers with teachers who were new to the profession and/or to the province/territory.

Research limitations/implications

Policy makers should consider the implementation of structured induction programs that successfully inculcate new teachers into school cultures and result in decreased teacher attrition and increased retention of beginning teachers. Mentoring is at the core of successful induction programs. Evident in all policy‐mandated induction programs under study was the importance of the school principal's role in effective functioning of mentoring programs. This aspect of the principal's role should be further examined and researched to understand the administrator role in the implementation and functioning of effective induction and mentoring programs for beginning teachers not only in Canada but worldwide.

Practical implications

In considering implementation of teacher induction programs, policymakers need to be aware that comprehensive, intensive support programs for new educators are both an effective and an efficient public investment. If mandated by policies at the macro levels as part of formal induction programs, mentoring programs have the potential to transform schools into collaborative places by establishing a culture of mentoring in schools.

Originality/value

Despite the perceived and actual benefits, government‐instituted induction programs for new teachers are not very common in Canada. While the discussions of such programs are certainly present in the educational literature, this exploratory pan‐Canadian review of induction and mentoring policies has the ability to inform provincial and territorial policymakers about the variability in institutionalizing those programs.

Details

International Journal of Mentoring and Coaching in Education, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6854

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 September 2016

Paula Kwan and Yuet-man Benjamin Li

The purpose of this paper is to understand the dilemmas facing Hong Kong vice-principals in discharging their roles and to further explore their engagement in informal…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand the dilemmas facing Hong Kong vice-principals in discharging their roles and to further explore their engagement in informal mentoring as a coping mechanism in the absence of a structured professional development program.

Design/methodology/approach

The qualitative study was conducted in the form of in-depth face-to-face, loosely structured individual interviews with ten informants from a variety of personal and school backgrounds, contributing to a set of data that unveiled the basic themes.

Findings

Three dilemmas facing Hong Kong vice-principals were identified: juggling administrative work with teaching, standing by management or siding with peer teachers, and forced innovation vs omnipresent conservatism. The findings also suggested that the informants tended toward external resources intentionally with a view to gaining emotional support as well as professional stimulation. They also engaged in informal mentoring, which took the form of observing principals’ behaviors, joining support groups organized by school governing bodies, and enrolling in academic programs offered by universities and/or professional bodies, as a way to resolve the dilemmas.

Research limitations/implications

Informal mentoring has been identified as an effective approach for Hong Kong vice-principals to acquire the skills and knowledge needed to overcome workplace challenges and the feelings of loneliness experienced upon changing their role. The findings point to the importance of formalizing mentoring in vice-principal development programs.

Originality/value

This study is the first of its kind to explore the impact of informal mentoring on vice-principals in Hong Kong where both dual-career track systems and a structured mentoring programs are missing.

Details

International Journal of Mentoring and Coaching in Education, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6854

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 June 2022

Muhammad Fauzan Ansyari, Wim Groot and Kristof De Witte

Professional development interventions (PDIs) are crucial for equipping teachers to use data effectively. Relying on previous studies reporting on such interventions, this…

Abstract

Purpose

Professional development interventions (PDIs) are crucial for equipping teachers to use data effectively. Relying on previous studies reporting on such interventions, this paper aims to identify and synthesise the goals, dimensions and conditions of PDIs for data use. This paper also examines the evidence of the effect of such interventions on student outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

In this study, the authors employ a systematic literature review and meta-analysis to analyse teacher PDIs for data use.

Findings

The results suggest that conceptual, practical and continual goals are identified in data use PDIs. Supported by conceptual, practical or normative tools, facilitators employ a variety of techniques in facilitating teachers’ data use through data teams or professional learning communities. The facilitation techniques include assessing needs, using models or modelling, observing performance, providing feedback, providing built-in time for reflection and brokering. Further, the results highlight the influence of several conditions that contribute to the success of the interventions. Finally, the meta-analysis shows a significant positive effect of the interventions on student outcomes, with an effect size of 0.17.

Research limitations/implications

The authors' proposed framework should be empirically tested and validated through field studies in various contexts. Since the authors focussed on studies reporting data use PDIs for instructional purposes as well as providing the descriptions of the PDIs, the number of included studies was only 27 and represented only four countries. Of the 27, 10 studies were used for the meta-analysis and the results may be subject to publication bias. Seemingly, the result may be related to the authors' inclusion/exclusion criteria that only included peer-reviewed journal articles and excluded non-peer-reviewed studies such as theses or dissertations. This criterion potentially neglected some relevant studies.

Practical implications

Policymakers interested in developing a data use PDI should take into account the various goals of data use PDIs, depending on policymakers' interests. Building teachers’ understanding of data use can be addressed by the practical goals. This can be conducted within a short period of time through training or courses, either in-person or online. This is appropriate for an initiation strategy for data use within schools. However, targeting specific skills and dispositional attributes around data use should adopt practical and continual goals. These types of goals require a PDI with a sustained duration embedded in teachers’ classroom practices; therefore, political and practical support is necessary.

Social implications

The authors argue that the review findings contribute to knowledge and insights by presenting data use PDIs that support teacher learning, implementation and sustainability of data use practices.

Originality/value

This article provides a proposed framework for studying teacher PDIs for data use and sheds light on several goals, a variety of facilitation strategies and conditions and the effect of the interventions on student outcomes.

Details

Journal of Professional Capital and Community, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-9548

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 November 1996

Dean Wilson

Contrasts development centres and assessment centres. Suggests five formats as typical for development centres and reviews their applications. Lists variables in…

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Abstract

Contrasts development centres and assessment centres. Suggests five formats as typical for development centres and reviews their applications. Lists variables in development centre design and highlights trends that are emerging to deal with contemporary organization requirements. Discusses the issues of what capabilities development centres should develop. Suggests transferable but unique capabilities are a paradox that must be resolved. Identifies a shift away from competences as necessary to sustain the commercial credibility of development centres ‐ and the personnel function. Highlights cognitive psychology as the basis for the new design focus. Concludes that development centres can remain the most effective way to create agreed futures for both staff and their organizations only if major changes take place.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 1 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Kevin Schoepp

This paper reports on one segment of a research project which investigates what faculty members perceive to be acting as barriers in their attempts to integrate…

Abstract

This paper reports on one segment of a research project which investigates what faculty members perceive to be acting as barriers in their attempts to integrate [information and communication] technology into their teaching at a laptop university. A web-based questionnaire was used to collect information from 69/288 (24%) faculty members from a small U.A.E. university. From the data gathered, patterns and associations emerged from which the researcher is able provide recommendations as to what type of interventions and programs could be provided to increase current levels of teaching with technology.

Details

Learning and Teaching in Higher Education: Gulf Perspectives, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2077-5504

Book part
Publication date: 1 March 2012

Judy Nagy

The contemporary life of an Australian academic has changed in almost every way imaginable in response to the challenges and opportunities emerging from global and…

Abstract

The contemporary life of an Australian academic has changed in almost every way imaginable in response to the challenges and opportunities emerging from global and national policy agendas. In this context, the subject coordinator11A subject coordinator may also be referred to as a Unit Chair, Unit Coordinator or Course Coordinator at different universities. represents the frontline of a move towards increasingly distributed forms of leading and learning. The knowledge that managing teaching responsibilities does not provide a clear route to promotion (with active research status providing a more well established path) means that academics may proactively minimise the time they spend on the discretionary tasks of leading and managing teaching well. Tasks that include adopting a proactive longer term of curriculum development, team building and teaching innovation, in addition to the more immediate needs for compliance and measurable outcomes. Research from an Australian Learning and Teaching Council (ALTC) project provides evidence that despite lack of formal recognition for many of the discretionary responsibilities of subject coordination, coordinators believe they are executing their job well. This chapter discusses factors that impede discretionary academic leadership behaviours in Australian higher education and suggests strategies to empower leadership and thus improve engagement with discretionary teaching and learning responsibilities.

Details

Discretionary Behavior and Performance in Educational Organizations: The Missing Link in Educational Leadership and Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-643-0

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 1978

PHILIP J RADCLIFF and DAVID JENKINS

It may be news to many trainers that in October, 1977 a report entitled An Approach to the Training of Staff with Training Officer Roles was issued by the TSA. Some of us…

Abstract

It may be news to many trainers that in October, 1977 a report entitled An Approach to the Training of Staff with Training Officer Roles was issued by the TSA. Some of us never received copies, others may have readily filed it in the appropriate section of the archives and the rest may well have read and digested its contents. All of us have an open invitation to tender our views to the committee on trainers. However what concerns the authors is the lack of public debate on the report. After all it is now a decade since the Central Training Council published its report on the training of training officers, and the TSA is timely in suggesting we take stock of the training scene. Yet the ‘great debate’ seems to have achieved minimal proportions within industry. It is our contention that there is a serious gap between the debate being pursued at national levels by bodies such as the TSA committee on trainers and the real everyday concerns of training managers in industry. We feel that the TSA committee's invitation is to join in a debate that has already been channelled into directions remote from the issues that really matter. The central issue for trainers is the uncertainty about what their role should be and how it should relate to those other people within the concerns for which they work.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 10 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2005

To highlight the successful use by Lloyds TSB of online and paper‐based numerical‐reasoning tests to help to sift the high volume of applicants for its graduate program.

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Abstract

Purpose

To highlight the successful use by Lloyds TSB of online and paper‐based numerical‐reasoning tests to help to sift the high volume of applicants for its graduate program.

Design/methodology/approach

The article is based on an interview with Sally Cox, human‐resource manager for Lloyds TSB graduate management, and also includes details of the structure and content of the Lloyds TSB graduate program.

Findings

Administered automatically, the sophisticated online numerical reasoning test forms a seamless part of the bank's online application process. The paper‐based test, which is scored on a computer, is used at assessment centers to verify the candidates' online scores.

Practical implications

The article suggests key areas in which automation of the recruitment function could serve a useful purpose for large employers.

Originality/value

The article will be of value to human‐resource managers faced with the problem of dealing with a large number of applications for a small number of openings.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

Keywords

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