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Article
Publication date: 7 September 2020

Obiora Kingsley Udem, Doris U. Aghoghovwia and Ebikabowei Emmanuel Baro

The purpose of this study is to determine the type of information Library and Information Science professionals share in the WhatsApp groups in Nigeria.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to determine the type of information Library and Information Science professionals share in the WhatsApp groups in Nigeria.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopted a quantitative content analysis research design. With a total of 739 participants, 1,385 posts of six different WhatsApp groups of Library and Information Science professionals for three months were analyzed.

Findings

The study found that the most shared information among the Library and Information Science professionals in Nigeria is post on professional information. This demonstrates that librarians are determined to share professional information among them to promote the profession. This was followed by political information basically on the Nigerian Library Association national executives’ election, and job advertisements related to the library. Although a few members violate the rules by posting the kind of information not required in the WhatsApp group, the erring members are quickly called to order and warned by the WhatsApp group administrator.

Social implications

Professional ties can grow among information specialists and library practitioners through participation in virtual communities such as WhatsApp group. The implication of this work is in showing that social media especially WhatsApp groups can be used as a knowledge sharing mechanism to share timely, current and relevant information among professionals in different occupations.

Originality/value

Findings on the use of WhatsApp group in sharing professional information will inform several other Library and Information Science professionals in other countries of the need to adopt this channel to disseminate timely information related to up-coming conferences, training opportunities, workshops, call for papers and so on among the professionals. The results of this paper are valuable for anyone interested in an avenue to share or receive much quicker and pertinent information that saves the time of professionals in any occupation.

Details

The Electronic Library , vol. 38 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2002

Ann Ritchie and Paul Genoni

This evaluative research represents the first report in the literature to date in which a group mentoring programme has been evaluated using a quasi‐experimental research…

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2635

Abstract

This evaluative research represents the first report in the literature to date in which a group mentoring programme has been evaluated using a quasi‐experimental research design. Results indicated that the programme was effective in one domain of professionalism, the main outcome variable; and that career‐development outcomes were significantly higher in programme participants. In addition to the previously established functions of mentoring (career and psychosocial development), the research suggests that the conceptual basis of mentoring should be expanded to include the function of professionalism. This has implications for both the practical aspects of mentoring programme development and for future evaluative research. Data were collected by means of pre‐ and post‐test questionnaires and analysed by multiple regression analysis.

Details

Library Management, vol. 23 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2004

Orie E. Barron, Donal Byard and Charles R. Enis

This study uses experimental data to compare the information generated by professional and nonprofessional investors when both groups receive access to the same financial…

Abstract

This study uses experimental data to compare the information generated by professional and nonprofessional investors when both groups receive access to the same financial disclosures. We also manipulate the disclosure level for both subject groups. Using the method developed by Barron, Kim, Lim and Stevens (1998), we then analyze the information contained in stock price forecasts that were made by the experimental subjects. Professionals on average inferred more information than nonprofessionals. The higher level of disclosure did not affect the information possessed by the professional investors. However, we find that a higher level of disclosure is associated with more private information being produced (or inferred) by nonprofessional investors. As a result, these subjects realized a significant improvement in the accuracy of their mean forecasts relative to their individual forecasts. This finding suggests that the enhanced capacity of firms to widely disclose information to all market participants via the Internet, together with the SEC's new “Fair Disclosure (FD)” regulation, has the potential to produce a significant increase in privately inferred information for on‐line nonprofessionals, potentially resulting in the aggregation of more diverse information into share prices.

Details

Review of Accounting and Finance, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-7702

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 11 April 2016

Denise L. Anthony and Timothy Stablein

The purpose of this paper is to explore different health care professionals’ discourse about privacy – its definition and importance in health care, and its role in their…

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11789

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore different health care professionals’ discourse about privacy – its definition and importance in health care, and its role in their day-to-day work. Professionals’ discourse about privacy reveals how new technologies and laws challenge existing practices of information control within and between professional groups in health care, with implications not only for patient privacy, but also for the role of information control in professions more generally.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted in-depth, semi-structured interviews with n=83 doctors, nurses, and health information professionals in two academic medical centers and one veteran’s administration hospital/clinic in the Northeastern USA. Interview responses were qualitatively coded for themes and patterns across groups were identified.

Findings

The health care providers and the authors studied actively sought to uphold the protection (and control) of patient information through professional ethics and practices, as well as through the use of technologies and compliance with legal regulations. They used discourses of professionalism, as well as of law and technology, to sometimes accept and sometimes resist changes to practice required in the changing technological and legal context of health care. The authors found differences across professional groups; for some, protection of patient information is part of core professional ethics, while for others it is simply part of their occupational work, aligned with organizational interests.

Research limitations/implications

This qualitative study of physicians, nurses, and health information professionals revealed some differences in views and practices for protecting patient information in the changing technological and legal context of health care that suggest some professional groups (doctors) may be more likely to resist such changes and others (health information professionals) will actively adopt them.

Practical implications

New technologies and regulations are changing how information is used in health care delivery, challenging professional practices for the control of patient information that may change the value or meaning of medical records for different professional groups.

Originality/value

Qualitative findings suggest that professional groups in health care vary in the extent of information control they have, as well in how they view such control. Some groups may be more likely to (be able to) resist changes in the professional control of information that stem from new technologies or regulatory policies. Some professionals recognize that new IT systems and regulations challenge existing social control of information in health care, with the potential to undermine (or possibly bolster) professional self-control for some but not necessarily all occupational groups.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2005

Eleni Apospori, Nancy Papalexandris and Eleanna Galanaki

To shed some light on the motivational profile of entrepreneurial as opposed to professional CEOs in Greece.

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3271

Abstract

Purpose

To shed some light on the motivational profile of entrepreneurial as opposed to professional CEOs in Greece.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on McClelland's motivational patterns, i.e. power, achievement and affiliation, as well as responsibility; interviews with Greek entrepreneurial and professional CEOs were conducted. Then, interviews were content‐analysed, in order to identify differences in motivational profiles of those two groups of CEOs.

Findings

Achievement, motivation and responsibility were found to be the most significant discriminating factors between entrepreneurial and professional CEOs.

Research limitations/implications

The current research focuses only on McClelland's typology. Other aspects affecting entrepreneurial inclination are not studied in the current paper.

Practical implications

One of the major implications deriving from the identified characteristics of successful entrepreneurial and professional CEOs has to do with the preparation and training of young leaders for both larger and smaller firms.

Originality/value

This paper studies, for the first time, the leadership profile of CEOs in Greece and identifies differences between professional and entrepreneurial ones. This is of great value in an SMEs dominated economy, such as Greece, where these research findings can be used for the development of entrepreneurship.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 13 July 2015

Melissa Mitchell and Christopher D. Zatzick

The purpose of this paper is to examine skill underutilization and collective turnover in a large professional service firm (PSF). The authors hypothesize that skill…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine skill underutilization and collective turnover in a large professional service firm (PSF). The authors hypothesize that skill underutilization is positively related to collective turnover, that skill underutilization is greater among professionals than nonprofessionals, and that the positive relationship between skill underutilization and collective turnover is stronger for professionals than for nonprofessionals.

Design/methodology/approach

Using survey data from a large PSF, the authors test these predictions across 191 groups (professional and nonprofessional) in 80 offices. Collective turnover rates were taken from company records one year after the survey was administered.

Findings

The authors find support for the prediction that skill underutilization is positively related to collective turnover. In addition, skill underutilization is greater among professionals than nonprofessionals within a PSF. However, the relationship between skill underutilization and collective turnover did not differ between professionals and nonprofessionals.

Research limitations/implications

While the authors find that skill underutilization is positively related to collective turnover, future research is needed to measure the group processes that occur among group members and lead to collective turnover. Limitations of this study include the inability to validate the aggregation of data from the individual level to the group level, and the generalizability of findings to other PSFs or to involuntary turnover situations.

Practical implications

Understanding the antecedents of collective turnover is of particular concern to PSFs, as they are composed of highly skilled, intrinsically motivated professionals, who generate value for the firm. These findings are particularly timely, given the significant levels of underemployment in countries throughout the world.

Originality/value

In addition to extending skill underutilization and collective turnover research to the occupational group level, the findings highlight the importance of providing development opportunities for employees during difficult economic conditions in order to minimize collective turnover.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 34 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 14 March 2016

Rosalie Coppin and Greg Fisher

Mentoring is widely used in the health sector, particularly for early career professionals in the public health system. However, many allied health professionals are…

Abstract

Purpose

Mentoring is widely used in the health sector, particularly for early career professionals in the public health system. However, many allied health professionals are employed in private practice and rely on their professional association to provide mentoring support and training. This mentoring context is under-researched. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

A purposeful sample of 15 allied health professionals were interviewed using semi-structured interviews that were then analyzed using template analysis.

Findings

The many-to-many group mentoring program delivered valuable knowledge, diagnostic skills and networking opportunities but did not provide inclusion, role modeling or psychosocial support to participants. Also identified were structural and operational issues including; the role of the coordinator in addressing contribution reluctance and participant confidence, confidentiality issues, lack of mentor training and overall organization of the program.

Practical implications

Group mentoring is a valuable method of delivery for professional associations. The many-to-many group mentoring model is beneficial in a situation where the availability of mentors is limited. Further, the importance of having a dedicated program coordinator and a skilled facilitator is emphasized.

Originality/value

This research contributes to the limited literature on many-to-many group mentoring by reviewing the effectiveness of an existing many-to-many group mentoring program for allied health professionals delivered by a professional association.

Details

Qualitative Research in Organizations and Management: An International Journal, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5648

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1993

J.A. Kennerley

Professionals subscribe to a given set of shared core values whichdefine their profession. In medicine they relate to the saving of lifeand healing of the sick. Autonomy…

Abstract

Professionals subscribe to a given set of shared core values which define their profession. In medicine they relate to the saving of life and healing of the sick. Autonomy is concerned with the extent to which the professional body can set its own rules and standards which illustrate the ethos of the profession and define its character. It is the professionals collectively who monitor the profession in terms of procedures, practice, entry requirements and licences. Society′s role is to determine what is appropriate or acceptable behaviour by professionals and it is increasingly asking about medical activities from a standpoint of priorities of need, appropriateness and value for money. There have traditionally been two types of professional group, random and clustered but we are now beginning to see the emergence of a third type, the managed group. The management of clustered professional groups is extremely difficult. Professional and academic freedoms are jealously guarded while organizational goals are relegated in comparison. The task facing managers in health care is daunting but there are signs of progress. We are beginning to see the emergence of a new partnership between clinicians and managers with agreement on collective interpretation of clinical values leading to the development of an enhanced ethos of health care which is better suited to the needs of the patients.

Details

Journal of Management in Medicine, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-9235

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 26 October 2005

Helen Freidus, Susan Feldman, Charissa M. Sgouros and Marilyn Wiles-Kettenmann

This chapter documents monthly meetings of Bank Street College Reading and Literacy alumnae between October 2002 and December 2004. It describe the ways in which case…

Abstract

This chapter documents monthly meetings of Bank Street College Reading and Literacy alumnae between October 2002 and December 2004. It describe the ways in which case study and self-study methodologies enabled participants to support their own professional development and that of colleagues. Findings suggest that the process enabled participants to revisit, reconsider, and reframe understandings and perspectives both in the minute and later as they shared experiences with a broader audience. Outcomes include a more extensive professional knowledge base, increased ability to meet the needs of children and parents, and a stronger sense of self as professional identity.

Details

Learning from Research on Teaching: Perspective, Methodology, and Representation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-254-2

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Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2008

Ann Dill and Joanne Coury

Purpose – This chapter assesses the role of self-help groups within the emerging civil society in two transitional economies, Croatia and Slovenia, focusing on the impact…

Abstract

Purpose – This chapter assesses the role of self-help groups within the emerging civil society in two transitional economies, Croatia and Slovenia, focusing on the impact of relationships with health or social care professionals and the state.

Methodology – Methods include participant observation, interviews, and document analysis of 31 groups studied intermittently from 2001 to 2007.

Findings – Self-help groups range from those three decades old to those dealing with “new social problems.” Groups, and the third sector generally, remain essentially dependent on the state. Few exist separately from formal service organizations. Those closely linked with medical institutions are challenged by state retrenchment and privatization. Others contend with funding instability, and Western models of non-profit development are expanding. Relationships with professionals are neither subservient nor independent; instead, groups act as corollaries and educators to the professional realm.

Implications, limitations, and value – Findings suggest more nuances in self-help groups' relations with the state and professionals than found in Western settings. This may illustrate both the potential and the limits of citizen involvement in new non-governmental sectors. It also demonstrates how relations between professionals and self-help groups depend on social and material relations well beyond the domain of systems of care. While specific findings cannot be generalized beyond the research settings, the study shows the importance of understanding such groups within social and political contexts. Contributions to civil society here included re-making public meanings, identities, and relations with professionalized systems. Further comparative assessment of self-help associations is essential to theory on the third sector in civil society.

Details

Patients, Consumers and Civil Society
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-215-9

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