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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2006

Donald G. Sinclair and Ernest P. Boger

The purpose of this paper is to advance the sport of golf as a compelling enhancement of the Caribbean region tourism product and assess prospects for the development of…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to advance the sport of golf as a compelling enhancement of the Caribbean region tourism product and assess prospects for the development of golf tourism in Guyana, catalysed by World Cup Cricket, 2007.

Design/methodology/approach

Documentation derived from leading researchers in the field certify contemporary golfing's international steep growth curve and global tourism implications. Additional theoretical issues include environmental consequences of Caribbean golf course development are explored. Attention is then directed toward analysis of golfing infrastructure/superstructure in Guyana.

Findings

Participation in the sport of golf is indeed experiencing a major global upswing, especially among non‐traditional devotees, largely due to the high international profiles of non‐traditional golf professionals exemplified by Tiger Woods and Vijay Singh. While some Caribbean destinations will profit considerably, the golf tourism carrying capacity of Guyana will require major upgrading to reap significant benefits.

Research limitations/implications

The implications should constitute a clear wake‐up call to Guyana and other Caribbean regional tourism establishments if golf tourism is to be taken seriously as an enrichment component of the tourism product available to participants of CWC 2007.

Practical implications

Tourism planners and developers will be able to utilize these findings as a road map to establishing or enhancing golf tourism in their respective destinations, particularly in the Caribbean region.

Originality/value

The authors believe that their particular conceptual approach to the challenge of exploiting the potential golf tourism windfall from CWC 2007 represents a valuable contribution to the literature of tourism development and a seminal research piece that will find its way into the Professional Golf Management degree curriculum resources of regional and international universities that have a legacy of post‐colonial national development.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 18 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 7 October 2013

Helena Reis and Antónia Correia

In the late eighteenth century, golf emerged as a men's game. Since then, women have striven to play, yet without success. A ratio of around 80 percent of male players…

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1232

Abstract

Purpose

In the late eighteenth century, golf emerged as a men's game. Since then, women have striven to play, yet without success. A ratio of around 80 percent of male players against 20 percent female proves that women are far from being accepted in golf. This study, supported by qualitative analyses of women golfers' life stories, attempts to evaluate to what extent this prejudice exists.

Design/methodology/approach

The ecological system theory, the causal historical wave model, the intrapersonal, interpersonal and structural factors, and the constraints/facilitators paradigm were first used to support the theoretical model that was defined based on the literature. Second, the model was revisited according to textual data collected from 25 narratives of women in the nineteenth century. The present research applies this model throughout a set of six life stories of contemporary Portuguese women who excelled in golf, attempting to test the persistence of this discrimination.

Findings

The results highlight that structural and interpersonal factors persist across time. Some aspects of women's lifestyle did not change much since some cultural values are difficult to overcome. The research highlights that the exclusion of women, more than explicit discrimination, is a cultural factor engrained in their daily lives, meaning that women exclude themselves, tacitly accepting this discrimination.

Research limitations/implications

The research focuses only on Portuguese women. Further studies should evaluate the pertinence of these factors amongst other nationalities and cultures.

Originality/value

The low participation of women in golf is acknowledged by golf stakeholders in Portugal, but this has not been the object of research; thus, to the authors' knowledge, this is the first paper about this subject in Portugal.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 22 July 2021

Christopher Paul Cain, Lisa Nicole Cain, James A. Busser and Hee Jung (Annette) Kang

This study sought to understand how having a calling influenced engagement, work–life balance and career satisfaction for Professional Golfers Association of America (PGA…

Abstract

Purpose

This study sought to understand how having a calling influenced engagement, work–life balance and career satisfaction for Professional Golfers Association of America (PGA) and Golf Course Superintendent of America (GCSA) professionals.

Design/methodology/approach

A conceptual model was used to examine callings among golf course supervisors and its impact on their engagement, work–life balance and career satisfaction. This study also explored the moderation effect of employees’ generalized or specialized role on the calling–engagement relationship. Surveys were collected from a single golf management company and partial least squares structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM) was used for data analysis.

Findings

The results revealed significant relationships among all of the variables, with the exception of the impact of having a calling on work–life balance. Additionally, the more having a calling increased, the more important it was for supervisors to have specialized roles to increase their engagement.

Originality/value

This study identifies important differences in factors that promote career satisfaction for golf course supervisors and extends current understanding of role theory.

Details

International Hospitality Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2516-8142

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Book part
Publication date: 7 December 2017

Hirotaka Matsuoka and Akiko Arai

Abstract

Details

Sport Business in Leading Economies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-564-3

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2000

Otis W. Gilley and Marc C. Chopin

Although most labor and microeconomic textbooks contain a theoretical discussion of the backward‐bending labor supply curve, scant empirical evidence of this phenomenon…

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1297

Abstract

Although most labor and microeconomic textbooks contain a theoretical discussion of the backward‐bending labor supply curve, scant empirical evidence of this phenomenon exists. In this paper we investigate the behavior of PGA golf professionals as they make labor‐leisure choices for performing on the PGA Tour. Using tournament theory to model this labor market and data from tournament performances over three seperate years, we find significant evidence that higher paid PGA Tour players do indeed operate in the backward‐bending region of their labor supply curves.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 26 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

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Book part
Publication date: 20 September 2021

Beth G. Clarkson, Ali Bowes, Lucy Lomax and Jessica Piasecki

The coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic in early 2020 prompted widespread global lockdowns as the world looked to contain and reduce the impact of the virus, including a pause…

Abstract

The coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic in early 2020 prompted widespread global lockdowns as the world looked to contain and reduce the impact of the virus, including a pause on most sporting competitions (Parnell et al., 2020). COVID-19 has greatly affected the world, exposing stark inequalities, especially across gendered lines, in areas of society such as the labour market, domestic responsibility and economic hardship (Alon et al., 2020). Sport is a crucial, interwoven aspect of society and like wider societal trends, elite women's sport has been adversely affected by the pandemic, facing an existential threat (Bowes et al., 2020; Clarkson et al., 2020; Rowe, 2020). The aim of this chapter is to provide an overview of how the pandemic is negatively impacting a wide variety of elite women's sports. Specifically, we cover sports where women have traditionally existed on the margins of the sport and could be considered as male-dominated labour industries. Centring primarily on the United Kingdom, we present a brief chronology of the impact of the crisis on elite women's sport, across football, rugby, cricket and golf – in many ways different from the men's versions – spanning the eight months since the start of the pandemic in March 2020 until the time of writing in November 2020. Throughout, the chapter utilises qualitative data from elite sportswomen encouraged to share their experiences during the pandemic (see Bowes et al., 2020). Subsequently, this chapter concludes with a summary of the challenges for women operating in (semi-)professional sports environments.

Details

The Professionalisation of Women’s Sport
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-196-6

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 12 October 2018

Christopher Paul Cain, Lisa Nicole Cain and Vicki J. Rosser

The purpose of this paper is to examine student, program and institutional support characteristics that relate to cohort intent to persist among Professional Golfers…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine student, program and institutional support characteristics that relate to cohort intent to persist among Professional Golfers’ Association Golf Management University Program (PGA-GMUP) undergraduate students from 12 universities.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey instrument was created and disseminated to the targeted population. Multiple regressions were used to analyze the 473 responses of students’ intention to persist across the three independent variables (student, program and institutional support).

Findings

The research findings suggest higher levels of college GPA, career goals specific to the student’s desire to become a PGA professional, higher levels of faculty engagement, higher levels of satisfaction with major, being a leader in the student association and involvement in the student association are related to students’ intent to persist. Conversely, the results suggest career goals focused on being happy instead of graduation or working as a PGA professional and finding it difficult to make friends are associated with lower levels of intention to persist, while parental expectations of advanced degrees negatively affected students’ intent to persist. Additionally, passing a player ability test did not have bearing on intention to persist.

Originality/value

Results from this analysis offer insight into which persistence factors lead to students’ matriculation, with the ultimate goal of program completion. Identifying persistence factors may help PGA-GMUPs and other hospitality programs recruit students that are more likely to persist in the program, develop program characteristics that optimize cohort matriculation, and utilize university or institutional support services characteristics that may ensure program completion.

Details

International Hospitality Review, vol. 32 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2516-8142

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 20 September 2021

Abstract

Details

The Professionalisation of Women’s Sport
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-196-6

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2000

Michael Melton and Thomas S. Zorn

Using data from the Senior PGA Tours we analyze the incentive effects of rank order tournaments. Previous studies using data from the PGA Tour reached conflicting…

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1625

Abstract

Using data from the Senior PGA Tours we analyze the incentive effects of rank order tournaments. Previous studies using data from the PGA Tour reached conflicting conclusions. To resolve the issue, the Senior PGA Tour was chosen for its unique format where players are not cut from the tournament before completion, eliminating any survival bias. The findings support the hypothesis that the level of prizes in Senior PGA tournaments influences players’ performance, indicating that tournaments can be used to motivate performance.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 26 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

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Article
Publication date: 4 October 2011

Jason Paul Koenigsfeld, Joe Perdue, Hyewon Youn and Robert H. Woods

The purpose of this study was to update previous studies conducted on important managerial competencies used by private club managers by examining the importance and…

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2419

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to update previous studies conducted on important managerial competencies used by private club managers by examining the importance and frequency of use of management competencies applied to the private club industry.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of 800 randomly selected private club managers was used for this study. The study included only active members of the Club Managers Association of America (CMAA).

Findings

The results indicate a change in what club managers do between 2002 and today. Except the added competency domains, results are very similar to previous studies. Accounting and finance, human resources and food and beverage competencies remain highly important as well as the most frequently used. The overall importance rating of the leadership domain was categorized as an essential competency with a mean score over 4.50. The other competency domains/clusters overall ratings were categorized as considerably important managerial competencies with mean scores between 3.50 and 4.50.

Practical implications

This paper will help clubs provide appropriate training programs for management staff and also provide a basis for CMAA to develop new professional development programs that would meet manager needs for developing competencies needed for the future.

Originality/value

Managerial competencies are viewed as a snapshot in time in a sense that these studies must be updated over time to incorporate new roles and trends within the industry. The results of this study were compared to previous studies conducted on club manager competencies to see if important managerial competencies changed over time.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 23 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 2000