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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2000

Sue Browell

A cooperative model of staff development in relation to professional education is outlined which considers staff development within both further and higher education

Abstract

A cooperative model of staff development in relation to professional education is outlined which considers staff development within both further and higher education. Examines general principles of human resource development, continuing professional development as well as quality and benchmarking issues. A case study of the development of course tutors who have academic responsibility for managing professional courses approved by the Institute of Personnel and Development (IPD) within further education colleges and universities in the North East of England is presented. Considers the cooperative approach to staff development between competing educational institutions and the collective relationship between the educational institutions and a professional body. The need for cooperation is examined within the context of the professional institute and the challenges facing the Education Group at its inception are briefly outlined. Benefits for staff, students and ultimately the professional body are detailed and, finally, the model is summarised and its application to other institutions is briefly considered.

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Article
Publication date: 3 July 2017

Ingrid Mulà, Daniella Tilbury, Alexandra Ryan, Marlene Mader, Jana Dlouhá, Clemens Mader, Javier Benayas, Jirí Dlouhý and David Alba

The world is shaped by an education system that reinforces unsustainable thinking and practice. Efforts to transform our societies must thus prioritise the education of…

Abstract

Purpose

The world is shaped by an education system that reinforces unsustainable thinking and practice. Efforts to transform our societies must thus prioritise the education of educators – building their understanding of sustainability and their ability to transform curriculum and wider learning opportunities. The purpose of this paper is to focus on university educators and critically review the professional development and policy landscape challenges that influence their effective engagement with Education for Sustainable Development (ESD). The paper is informed by a pan-European collaboration involving 33 countries that identified emerging scholarship and practice in this area and assessed the lessons learned from ESD professional development initiatives. It sets the context for a special issue titled “Professional Development in Higher Education for Sustainable Development” that draws together a collection of articles focusing on professional development of university educators across the world.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper provides a critical review of existing practice, international policy frameworks and literature relating to ESD, professional development and higher education. It examines innovative initiatives worldwide that seek to improve the capability of educators in higher education to integrate ESD into academic practice at individual, disciplinary and institutional levels. A rigorous process of selection was applied and overseen by an international expert group. This ensured that the initiatives sought educational change in ESD, and not simply the embedding of content about sustainability into learning opportunities. It also assured that the initiatives had a clear and intentional professional learning process to underpin the engagement of participants with ESD.

Findings

ESD has grown in visibility and status worldwide, with a clear increase in activity in higher education. The sector is viewed as a significant force for change in societies, through the education provision it offers to future professionals and leaders in all sectors. However, universities currently lack capacity to integrate ESD effectively into mainstream teaching practices and the training they provide for academic staff or to integrate ESD into their institutional teaching and learning priorities. Many ESD activities remain focused on teaching issues arising in sustainable development research and delivering specialist modules or courses in sustainability. Very few countries and institutions have significant staff development programmes to enhance the ESD competences of university educators and build their academic leadership capabilities for ESD. The contributions to this special issue show the need for greater understanding of the multi-level task of integrating ESD into professional development activities, not just for individual impact in the classroom but to advance institutional change and decisively influence the teaching and learning discourse of higher education.

Originality/value

There are few research studies and documented activities on ESD professional development in higher education available in the literature. This paper attempts to explore what ESD professional development involves and describes its complexity within the higher education sector. The special issue provides a collection of innovative research and practical initiatives that can help those involved in education and learning to develop ESD as a priority for future university innovative pathways.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 18 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 22 August 2014

C. Engel Laura, Reich Michaela and Vilela Adriana

Against a broader global and regional shift toward “quality education for all,” the chapter explores education policy developments and trends related to teacher education

Abstract

Against a broader global and regional shift toward “quality education for all,” the chapter explores education policy developments and trends related to teacher education and professional development in Latin America and the Caribbean. We examine how multilateral education policy circulation and regional horizontal cooperation has guided these education policy developments. The chapter is organized into three parts. It first provides a discussion of educational multilateralism and new forms of horizontal cooperation, as it relates to educational development efforts. We argue that these new forms of multilateralism and horizontal cooperation guide the development of policies that seek to enhance both educational equity and quality education, particularly through advancing teacher education and professional development. The second section explores several recent education policy trends that relate to teacher education and professional development in Latin America and the Caribbean, and the challenges that Ministries of Education face when designing and implementing programs of teacher education and professional development. Lastly, the chapter examines the role of regional organizations in promoting new forms of regional horizontal cooperation specific to teacher education and professional development, focusing on the example of Organization of American States’ (OAS) Inter-American Teacher Education Network (ITEN).

Details

Annual Review of Comparative and International Education 2014
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-453-4

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 21 September 2012

Xue Han

This article aims to describe and discuss four major innovations to improve the quality of teacher education including preparation programs and professional development

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to describe and discuss four major innovations to improve the quality of teacher education including preparation programs and professional development programs in recent years in China. The four major innovations include establishing the National Curriculum Standards for Teacher Education (NCSTE) and the National Teacher Certification Examination; implementing the “double development plan” to reform clinical practice; launching the “National Training Plan” to develop in‐service teachers; and consolidating the career ladder for teachers.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper takes the form of a review of the government documents and current literature.

Findings

The author argues that the four major innovations reflect the central trends to reform teacher education both in China and the USA – increased standards and accreditation, more clinical experiences in preparation, increased use of technology in teacher professional development, and more accountability and incentive for teachers.

Originality/value

When the world is faced with the globalized economy, cultural exchange and social equity issues, discussions about the recent innovations of China's teacher education will shed light on our understanding of better approaches to improve teacher quality that no doubt connect tradition and local practices with global convergence.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1995

Aira Lepik

The growth in responsibility of librarians under the country′schanged conditions requires their high‐quality professional education,flexible continuing education and

Abstract

The growth in responsibility of librarians under the country′s changed conditions requires their high‐quality professional education, flexible continuing education and professional development at all levels. Offers an overview of librarians′ professional training in Estonia, its traditions and possibilities today. Estonian library assistants study at the Viljandi College of Culture: degree courses in library and information sciences (LIS) are offered by the Tallinn Pedagogical University, including Master′s and doctoral degrees. Gives a detailed account of the undergraduate LIS curriculum at the Tallinn Pedagogical University. Systematic continuing education is a necessity because of developments in information technology and because of rapid changes in Estonian economic and social life. Touches on local and state‐wide continuing education activities. Undertakings by the Librarians Education Board in educating library staff without formal LIS education are an integral part of librarians′ continuing education and retraining. In order to disseminate information about Estonian libraries in the world professional community, our librarians must be aware of developments elsewhere. Speaks about the return of Estonian librarians into international professional organizations (IFLA, co‐operation with Baltic libraries, etc.) Deals with the prospects for Estonian librarians in co‐operation with international professional organizations (IATUL, ABDOS, IAML, IASL, etc.) in a more detailed way, including their participation in educational and developmental projects of other countries.

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Book part
Publication date: 22 August 2014

Alexander W. Wiseman and Emily Anderson

The Annual Review of Comparative and International Education 2014 provides an opportunity for reflection and debate of current issues in the field. Central among these is…

Abstract

The Annual Review of Comparative and International Education 2014 provides an opportunity for reflection and debate of current issues in the field. Central among these is how comparative and international education (CIE) is defined by scholars and practitioners, and how these understandings contribute to the field’s sense of professional and academic identity. The work of teachers and teaching in classrooms worldwide comprises much of the CIE field’s technical core and focus of policymaking as well as other relevant activity. As a result, the education of teachers and their professional development are key, and often undervalued, components. Based upon this foundation, the 2014 Annual Review highlights ways that teacher education and professional development impact CIE research and professional activity, and vice versa.

Details

Annual Review of Comparative and International Education 2014
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-453-4

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 23 October 2009

Imas Maesaroh and Paul Genoni

This paper aims to report base‐line data on the current levels of education, skills, and knowledge of Indonesian academic librarians, and provides an insight into their…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to report base‐line data on the current levels of education, skills, and knowledge of Indonesian academic librarians, and provides an insight into their continuing professional development. The paper also seeks to report: the current level of qualifications of librarians working in Indonesian academic libraries; and the current level and type of continuing professional development and work place training in Indonesian academic libraries.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper includes the results of a questionnaire delivered to all librarians working in Indonesian public universities. The survey instrument was based on that used in the NEXUS survey distributed to Australian library and information studies (LIS) professionals in 2006. The paper includes a comparison of survey results on key indicators for Indonesian and Australian library and information staff.

Findings

The research reports comparative shortcomings in the level and standard of education available to Indonesian academic librarians. The issue of continuing professional development is more complex, with quite high levels of participation in some types of training reported by the Indonesian respondents, but generally lower levels of satisfaction with that training than reported by their Australian counterparts.

Research limitations/implications

Some of the conclusions made comparing the situations in Indonesia and Australia are tentative due to the different understandings of key terms and concepts in the two countries. The data reported in the paper are quantitative and comprehensive findings require further qualitative research.

Practical implications

The results have implications for the future development of library education in Indonesia, and workplace training for Indonesian academic librarians.

Originality/value

The research reported is the first to collect large‐scale data relating to LIS workforce education and continuing professional development from a developing country.

Details

Library Management, vol. 30 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 26 October 2015

Armend Tahirsylaj, Kristina Brezicha and Sakiko Ikoma

This chapter explores the difference in two orientations – didaktik and curriculumand examines how these differing stances relate to teachers’ instructional practice…

Abstract

This chapter explores the difference in two orientations – didaktik and curriculumand examines how these differing stances relate to teachers’ instructional practice, engagement with professional development opportunities, and lesson design. A didaktik orientation influences much of the Nordic and Germanic countries, while a curriculum orientation is widespread in Commonwealth of Nations and the United States. This chapter explores the differences between these two theories of learning and teaching. More than just different theories of teaching and learning, we argue these theories shape how we see the world (i.e., objectified vs. subjectified) and manifest themselves in distinctive understandings of schools’ purpose, the type of learning engaged therein, and how people learn. Consequently, these orientations affect the teacher’s role, the qualifications necessary to teach, as well as other aspects of teacher quality such as instructional methods, and types of professional development.

Details

Promoting and Sustaining a Quality Teacher Workforce
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-016-2

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2008

L. Stainbank and G. Ramatho

Investigations into professional accountancy education gathered impetus with the publication of The impact of globalisation on accountancy education by Karreman in 2002…

Abstract

Investigations into professional accountancy education gathered impetus with the publication of The impact of globalisation on accountancy education by Karreman in 2002. This publication provided a comparative analysis of professional accountancy education in 25 countries worldwide, using a model developed for the classification of accountancy education systems. The rationale behind such an exercise is to promote educational exchange and facilitate educational development. The Karreman study only covered two countries in Africa, namely South Africa and Kenya. This study expands the Karreman study by comparing and benchmarking the professional accountancy education programmes in six member countries of the Eastern, Central and Southern African Federation of Accountants (ECSAFA) using the Karreman methodology. This study reports the results of a questionnaire survey to which seven accountancy bodies located in six countries responded. The results of this study revealed mostly agreement with the Karreman model. All the countries could be categorised as developing countries with common law/Roman‐Dutch legal systems and with a strong British influence. Thus similarities in regulation, education and practical experience are expected. The professional bodies tend towards professional selfregulation with low to medium membership regulation. All countries require practical experience before qualifying, and a theoretical approach to the final examination predominates. The study also shows that there is co‐operation in the region.

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Article
Publication date: 27 April 2012

Nicole A. Cooke

The field of librarianship is ever expanding and changing, from exploding internet and media technologies, to ever diverse patron groups with increasingly complex…

Abstract

Purpose

The field of librarianship is ever expanding and changing, from exploding internet and media technologies, to ever diverse patron groups with increasingly complex information needs. Library professionals need to be as savvy as the clients they serve, and the most productive and effective way for librarians to keep up with these changes is to seek out professional development opportunities. Librarians owe it to their clients and to themselves as competent professionals, to remain abreast of trends and developments in the field. The purpose of this paper is to address the changing landscape of the library profession, including the changing nature of library and information science education, and to exemplify the importance and necessity of continuing professional development for librarians, the newest manifestation of which is online professional development through Web 2.0 tools and social media technologies.

Design/methodology/approach

Specifically, using such technologies enables library professionals to develop an online personal learning network (PLN).

Findings

PLNs are beneficial because they are so customizable to an individual's work and research interests and time constraints, and they facilitate global learning and collaboration opportunities that may not otherwise be feasible. In times of financial difficulty, more traditional professional development opportunities requiring travel and funding are often prohibitive; PLNs enable continuous and affordable professional development opportunities that will benefit librarians and their institutions.

Originality/value

The paper discusses the newest technologies and opportunities and how their attendant considerations and concerns apply to library professions; also the best ways in which to deliver content and instruct future library professionals.

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