Search results

1 – 10 of over 70000
Article
Publication date: 31 July 2014

Anna Samsonova-Taddei and Christopher Humphrey

The accounting regulation literature has recently devoted a significant degree of attention to delineating the roles of accounting firms as key professional actors in the…

2783

Abstract

Purpose

The accounting regulation literature has recently devoted a significant degree of attention to delineating the roles of accounting firms as key professional actors in the transnational policy arena. Such a heightened level of scholarly engagement with firms seems to have shifted the focus away from the roles of the national professional institutes. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the importance of not losing sight of the national professional bodies as important players on the transnational governance scene.

Design/methodology/approach

The accounting regulation literature has recently devoted a significant degree of attention to delineating the roles of accounting firms as key professional actors in the transnational policy arena. Such a heightened level of scholarly engagement with firms seems to have shifted the focus away from the roles of the national professional institutes. The aim with this paper is to demonstrate the importance of not losing sight of the national professional bodies as important players on the transnational governance scene.

Findings

The paper provides empirical illustrations and discussion of the transforming agendas and strategies of influence pursued by various national professional bodies as they attempt to reinvent themselves to face up to the challenges of the changing regulatory landscape. Specifically, the paper analyses a range of activities where such bodies are seen to be competing with each other as well as partaking in a variety of collaborative initiatives in their quest to gain/maintain the status of a global/regional professional thought leader.

Practical implications

The paper is designed to encourage renewed academic debate on the roles and strategies of national professional institutes and highlight opportunities and venues for future research. The paper is also suggestive of the need to refine conceptual perspectives on professionalization processes operational in transnational settings.

Originality/value

The accounting literature is lacking in terms of contemporary study of national professional bodies as active institutions with global ambition and strategies of influence. This paper addresses such a shortcoming by analysing the strategic intent and actions of a range of such bodies (revealing, in the process, a quite fascinating complex of activity, competition and cooperation) and calling for a renewed focus on national professional bodies as a way of enhancing contemporary understanding of the workings of the “global accounting profession”.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 27 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 March 2016

Basil P. Tucker and Stefan Schaltegger

The purpose of this paper is to compare and contrast perceptions about the research-practice “gap” as it may apply within management accounting, from the perspective of…

3207

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to compare and contrast perceptions about the research-practice “gap” as it may apply within management accounting, from the perspective of professional accounting bodies in Australia and Germany.

Design/methodology/approach

The findings reported in this paper is based on the collection and analysis of data from interviews with 19 senior representatives from four Australian Professional bodies and 14 representatives of German Professional accounting bodies.

Findings

In Australia and Germany, there exist common as well as unique barriers preventing a more effective engagement of academic research with practice. Common to both countries is the perception that the communication of research represents a major barrier. In Australia, practitioner access to academic research is seen to be a principal obstacle; in Germany, the relevance of topics researched by academics is perceived to represent a significant barrier to academic research informing practice.

Research limitations/implications

This paper directly engages with, and extends recent empirically based research into the extent to which academic research may “speak” to management accounting practice. It extricates both common and specific barriers contributing to the oft-quoted “research-practice gap” in management accounting, and points to the pivotal nature of an intermediary to act as a conduit between academics and practice.

Originality/value

By investigating this issue in two quite different cultural, educational, academic and practice contexts, this paper provides much-needed empirical evidence about the nature, extent and pervasiveness of the perceived research-practice gap in management accounting, and provides a basis for further investigation of this important topic.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2008

L. Stainbank and G. Ramatho

Investigations into professional accountancy education gathered impetus with the publication of The impact of globalisation on accountancy education by Karreman in 2002…

Abstract

Investigations into professional accountancy education gathered impetus with the publication of The impact of globalisation on accountancy education by Karreman in 2002. This publication provided a comparative analysis of professional accountancy education in 25 countries worldwide, using a model developed for the classification of accountancy education systems. The rationale behind such an exercise is to promote educational exchange and facilitate educational development. The Karreman study only covered two countries in Africa, namely South Africa and Kenya. This study expands the Karreman study by comparing and benchmarking the professional accountancy education programmes in six member countries of the Eastern, Central and Southern African Federation of Accountants (ECSAFA) using the Karreman methodology. This study reports the results of a questionnaire survey to which seven accountancy bodies located in six countries responded. The results of this study revealed mostly agreement with the Karreman model. All the countries could be categorised as developing countries with common law/Roman‐Dutch legal systems and with a strong British influence. Thus similarities in regulation, education and practical experience are expected. The professional bodies tend towards professional selfregulation with low to medium membership regulation. All countries require practical experience before qualifying, and a theoretical approach to the final examination predominates. The study also shows that there is co‐operation in the region.

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1999

Sivakumar Velayutham

This paper seeks to identify and describe the shape of the professional accounting body in the new millennium. It is argued that the professional accounting body is at the…

Abstract

This paper seeks to identify and describe the shape of the professional accounting body in the new millennium. It is argued that the professional accounting body is at the brink of major changes at the turn of the century, due to its traditional role of self‐regulation being threatened by other institutions within the accounting domain. The paper identifies the professional accounting body in the twenty‐first century to be similar to that of a franchise. This, it is highlighted, would lead to the emergence of the global franchise.

Details

Pacific Accounting Review, vol. 11 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0114-0582

Article
Publication date: 17 September 2021

Daniel W. Richards, Sarath Lal Ukwatte Jalathge and Prem W. Senarath Yapa

This paper researches the professionalization of financial planning in Australia. The authors investigate how the institutional logic of major institutions inhibits this…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper researches the professionalization of financial planning in Australia. The authors investigate how the institutional logic of major institutions inhibits this occupation from moving toward a professional status.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses documentary analysis of government inquiries into Australian financial services from 1997 to 2017 to ascertain the various institutional logics relating to the professionalization of financial planning. The method involves generating ideas from the data and applying an institutional logic framework to make sense of impediments to the professionalization of financial planning in Australia.

Findings

The regulator adopted a self-regulation logic that empowered financial institutions to govern financial advice. These financial institutions have a logic of profit maximization that creates conflicts of interest in financial planning. The financial planning professional bodies adopted a logic of attracting and retaining members due to a competitive professional environment. Thus, financial planners have not been defined as fiduciaries, professional standards have not increased and an ineffective disciplinary resolution system exists.

Research limitations/implications

This research illustrates the various institutional logics that need to be addressed to professionalize financial planning in Australia. However, the data used is limited to that drawn from the parliamentary inquiries.

Originality/value

Prior research on the emergence of professions such as accounting has shown that financial institutions are sites of professionalization. This research shows that financial institutions impede professionalization in financial planning. Also, where the state granted legitimacy to other professions, this research indicates that the state regulator's logic of self-regulation has not legitimized financial planning.

Details

Journal of Public Budgeting, Accounting & Financial Management, vol. 34 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1096-3367

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 1995

Tom Lee

Reviews the history of the early development of the accountancyprofession in the UK and the USA and describes the organization ofprofessional accountancy bodies in both…

9624

Abstract

Reviews the history of the early development of the accountancy profession in the UK and the USA and describes the organization of professional accountancy bodies in both countries, concentrating particularly on events in the post‐formation period. Identifies the persistent struggle of UK and US accountants with the conflicting phenomena of economic self‐interest and public duty. Shows how professional accountancy in the UK and the USA evolved from internalized disputes to externalized defences of the professional mission. This evolution caused the actions of UK and US accountants to be scrutinized increasingly in public. Researched evidence of recent institutional reaction to such scrutiny is consistent with earlier behaviour associated with formation events. The economic self‐interest of accounting professionals appears continuously to have motivated their actions to protect the public interest.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 September 2007

Alison Baker

The purpose of this paper is to consider the issues which emerge when an autonomous, professional, member‐led organisation attempts to demonstrate its accountability to…

690

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to consider the issues which emerge when an autonomous, professional, member‐led organisation attempts to demonstrate its accountability to patients through lay involvement in its standard‐setting processes.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reports a project, which is still in progress and could be described as action research. Data were collected through participant observation in a series of discussions and working groups. A limited literature search was carried out at the start of the initiative but found little which relates to lay involvement in professional bodies.

Findings

The paper finds that patient involvement in a professional body is unlikely by itself to be a useful mechanism for delivering greater professional accountability.

Research limitations/implications

The paper is a single case study and can only suggest hypotheses for further research.

Practical implications

The paper shows that professional bodies of various types are increasingly being asked to demonstrate public involvement in their decision making. It is important to identify the most effective mechanisms for this and the limitations inherent in the structures of organisations, which are accountable primarily to their members.

Originality/value

The paper shows that individual doctors are held to account through a number of mechanisms, but little attention has been given to how medical professional bodies can be made more accountable for the collective power they hold. Patient involvement is interpreted within a consumerist model, which focuses on the doctor‐patient relationship and ignores the considerable strategic influence which medical royal colleges exercise within the health service.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 21 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 September 2020

Ilse Lubbe

The purpose of this paper is to provide a contextual analysis of the professional accounting education system of South Africa (SA).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a contextual analysis of the professional accounting education system of South Africa (SA).

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses the Global Model of Accounting Education (Watty et al., 2012) to describe the accounting education system of SA, which is then compared with similar case studies of Australia, Japan and Sri Lanka. Information about the SA accounting education system is contextualised from multiple sources, using data triangulation.

Findings

Several similarities between the SA accounting education system and that of Australia are found, such as the role and involvement of the professional bodies in the accreditation processes, with less similarities with that of Japan and Sri Lanka. The comparisons illuminate the economic development of each country and the level of involvement in the education programmes by the profession. Specific challenges in SA include the entrance hurdles to higher education and emphasis on an accounting degree.

Practical implications

The application of the Global Model of Accounting Education helps to identify the similarities in the global accounting arena and illuminates the uniqueness of the SA accounting education system. This study illustrates the establishment of an accounting education system that aligns with the International Education Standards (IESs).

Originality/value

The study contributes to the discussions around challenges in accounting education, specifically those associated with accreditation and a strong controlling relationship between academe and the profession.

Details

Journal of Accounting in Emerging Economies, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-1168

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1999

Vivien Beattie, Richard Brandt and Stella Fearnley

The Department of Trade and Industry (DTI) issued a consultation document in November 1998, which set out a framework for the independent regulation of the accountancy…

Abstract

The Department of Trade and Industry (DTI) issued a consultation document in November 1998, which set out a framework for the independent regulation of the accountancy profession. This framework broadly adopts the proposals put forward by the profession itself. In this paper, the focus is on audit regulation. The current regime is outlined and its structural weaknesses and procedural problems identified. The proposed reforms are described and critically evaluated. It is argued that the proposed reforms offer only a partial solution to regulatory concerns, since no changes are proposed to the existing regime either for registration, or for monitoring and discipline of the majority of audit cases. An expanded framework that rationalises current practices and provides a more comprehensive solution is suggested. A critical feature of the proposal is that a distinction is made between audits of small entities and audits of major listed companies, only the latter of which are of public interest. Each would have distinct licensing and monitoring procedures.

Details

Journal of Financial Regulation and Compliance, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1358-1988

Article
Publication date: 18 January 2016

Cédric Lesage, Geraldine Hottegindre and Charles Richard Baker

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to understand the role of the statutory auditing profession in France. The study is theoretically based on distinctions between…

1469

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to understand the role of the statutory auditing profession in France. The study is theoretically based on distinctions between a functionalist view of professions and a neo-weberian view. Prior research, conducted in Anglo-American countries has shown that the auditing profession has focussed primarily on protecting the private interests of the profession. Hence, there is a need to conduct research on this topic in a code law country where the state is expected to play a significant role in protecting the public interest.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology involves a content analysis of 148 disciplinary decisions issued against statutory auditors in France from 1989 to 2006. This analysis identified 21 types of violations grouped into public interest or private interest offences. Because visible offences are public and are more likely to threaten the reputation of the profession, these types of decisions are also studied with respect to their visibility.

Findings

The results reveal that in a code law country such as France the auditing profession tends to defend both the public interest as well as its private interests. The results also support the “visibility” effect.

Research limitations/implications

The written disciplinary decisions have been anonymized so that the names of the auditors and the clients cannot be identified.

Originality/value

This paper differs from previous studies conducted in the Anglo-American context which show an emphasis on protecting the private interests of the auditing profession. Moreover, this study reveals the existence of “mixed” offences and underlines that a profession primarily focusses on these cases. Thus, the work reconciles in part the functionalist and neo-weberian perspectives. Lastly, this paper confirms the importance of the visibility effect.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 70000