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Article

Galina Motova and Vladimir Navodnov

The purpose of this article is to analyze main principles, forms and approaches to education quality evaluation in the process of establishment, development and crucial…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to analyze main principles, forms and approaches to education quality evaluation in the process of establishment, development and crucial changes in the state accreditation of educational institutions and study programmes in Russian higher education in the last 20 years.

Design/methodology/approach

The major research method used in the paper is the qualitative analysis of legal and statistical documents, research papers and accreditation practices, which impacted the development and transformation of accreditation forms in Russia.

Findings

The transformation process of state accreditation during the last 20 years was conditioned by the changes in the state education policy and socio-economic situation. In a short period, under the influence of internal and external factors, Russian higher education has experienced significant changes in the structure of higher education and quality assurance. This resulted in different approaches to accreditation: state and independent, mandatory and voluntary, national and international.

Practical implications

The research outcomes may be applicable in the countries with developing accreditation systems and comparable scope of education.

Social implications

The study identifies the tendencies in the development of higher education and quality evaluation.

Originality/value

The paper systematizes the tendencies of development in quality assurance and distinguishes specific features and diversity of forms of the quality assurance in one of the largest systems of higher education.

Details

Higher Education Evaluation and Development, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-5789

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Article

Lynne Bowker

This paper aims to investigate the potential benefits and limitations associated with aligning accreditation and academic program reviews in post-secondary institutions…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the potential benefits and limitations associated with aligning accreditation and academic program reviews in post-secondary institutions, using a descriptive case study approach.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper describes two Canadian graduate programs that are subject to both external professional accreditation and institutional cyclical reviews, as they underwent an aligned review. The process was developed as a collaborative effort between the academic units, the professional associations and the university’s graduate-level quality assurance office. For each program, a single self-study was developed, a single review panel was constituted, and a single site visit was conducted. The merits and challenges posed by the alignment process are discussed.

Findings

Initial feedback from the academic units suggests that the alignment of accreditation and program reviews is perceived as reducing the burden on programs with regard to the time and effort invested by faculty, staff and other stakeholders, as well as in terms of financial expenses. Based on this feedback, along with input from reviewers and program evaluation committee members, 14 recommendations emerged for ways in which an aligned review process can be set up for success.

Practical implications

The results suggest that aligned reviews are not only resource-efficient but also allow reviewers to provide more holistic feedback that faculty may be more willing to engage with for program enhancement.

Originality/value

The present study contributes to the existing body of knowledge about conducting aligned reviews in response to external accreditation requirements or institutional needs. It summarizes the potential benefits and limitations and offers recommendations for potential best practices for carrying out aligned reviews for policymakers and practitioners.

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Article

Everard A. van Kemenade, Teun W. Hardjono and Henk J. de Vries

This paper seeks to find out which factors influence the willingness of professionals to contribute to a certification process and to understand the rationale behind this…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to find out which factors influence the willingness of professionals to contribute to a certification process and to understand the rationale behind this willingness.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on literature, prerequisites are formulated for the willingness of professionals to contribute to certification. These are compared with the results of a study among lecturers at Universities of Applied Sciences in The Netherlands and Flanders about their willingness to contribute to accreditation of their schools. This study combines survey and Delphi research.

Findings

Professionals agree on the added value of certification systems. They are willing to contribute to the certification process, provided that a set of conditions is fulfilled.

Research limitations/implications

The case focuses on large organisations for which certification is obligatory. The findings may not apply in small or medium‐sized organisations or if the main driver for certification is internal improvement. Further research is needed to verify the generalisation of the results to other sectors and countries.

Originality/value

Research has shown that it is difficult to motivate professionals to contribute to certification. Little research has been done on the reasons why. The paper provides more insight into the difficulties that organizations face to commit their professionals to become involved in certification and turns these into requirements to be fulfilled to achieve commitment. These are relevant for organisations, which need the support of their professional employees to achieve management system certification.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article

Ilse Lubbe

The purpose of this paper is to provide a contextual analysis of the professional accounting education system of South Africa (SA).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a contextual analysis of the professional accounting education system of South Africa (SA).

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses the Global Model of Accounting Education (Watty et al., 2012) to describe the accounting education system of SA, which is then compared with similar case studies of Australia, Japan and Sri Lanka. Information about the SA accounting education system is contextualised from multiple sources, using data triangulation.

Findings

Several similarities between the SA accounting education system and that of Australia are found, such as the role and involvement of the professional bodies in the accreditation processes, with less similarities with that of Japan and Sri Lanka. The comparisons illuminate the economic development of each country and the level of involvement in the education programmes by the profession. Specific challenges in SA include the entrance hurdles to higher education and emphasis on an accounting degree.

Practical implications

The application of the Global Model of Accounting Education helps to identify the similarities in the global accounting arena and illuminates the uniqueness of the SA accounting education system. This study illustrates the establishment of an accounting education system that aligns with the International Education Standards (IESs).

Originality/value

The study contributes to the discussions around challenges in accounting education, specifically those associated with accreditation and a strong controlling relationship between academe and the profession.

Details

Journal of Accounting in Emerging Economies, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-1168

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Article

Paul Andon, Clinton Free and Brendan O'Dwyer

The purpose of this paper is to examine attempts at jurisdictional expansion in the audit field. Specifically, the authors critically analyse the professional implications…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine attempts at jurisdictional expansion in the audit field. Specifically, the authors critically analyse the professional implications of “new audit spaces”, that is, novel auditing and assurance services that have emerged at intersections between audit and other fields such as the environment, the public sector, sport and education. The purpose is two-fold. First, to better understand the dynamics of new audit spaces, and second, to highlight the major challenges and adaptations prompted by these dynamics.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on Bourdieu’s theory of practice, the authors highlight and problematise four issues central to the construction of new audit spaces: independence; reporting; professional accreditation; and the nature of the audit role.

Findings

The audit profession has experienced mixed success in seeking to annex new audit spaces; in some instances, practices initially located at the margins of auditing have moved towards its centre, while elsewhere projects have been abandoned, colonised by others or remain in flux. In these ventures, the accounting profession is brought into competition with other bodies of expertise and modes of practice. In new audit spaces, core elements of auditing, as conventionally conceived, are transmogrified as they travel.

Originality/value

This analysis calls into question some of the “sacred cows” of auditing and challenges the transferability of the capitals and habitus of the accounting profession in other domains. Future research avenues are suggested.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 28 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

Keywords

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Article

Judith Lancaster, Jeffrey Braithwaite and David Greenfield

This paper aims to explore how surveying benefits accreditation surveyors and the organisations in which they are regularly employed. The purpose is to examine from the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore how surveying benefits accreditation surveyors and the organisations in which they are regularly employed. The purpose is to examine from the perspective of senior executives who pursue this form of secondary professional activity, what they seek from being surveyors and what they believe they gain from the experience.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were collected from recorded interviews with three senior area health executives who also serve as accreditation surveyors for the Australian Council on Healthcare Standards. The interviews comprised a series of open‐ended, semi‐structured questions. One hour was allocated for each interview. The questions were designed to explore why senior executive health professionals seek secondary professional activity as surveyors and their perceptions of the benefits they gain from surveying.

Findings

The benefits derived from surveying as a secondary professional activity fall into four categories. First, it exposes the surveyor to new methods and innovations. Second, it provides a unique form of ongoing learning. Third, it serves as a resource for acquiring expertise to enhance quality within the institutions in which the participants were regularly employed and, finally, it provides opportunities to contribute to the process of quality improvement and enhance public health beyond the organisations in which the participants were regularly employed.

Practical implications

This research identifies a key aspect of the accreditation process that has not been the focus of previous research. It provides a reference point for understanding the value of surveying to the surveyor and to the institutions in which they are regularly employed.

Originality/value

The paucity of existing literature on the role of the surveyor – both pre and post accreditation – makes this topic timely and significant. This study is important because almost all accreditation programs world wide rely on external surveyors, and yet we know little about them.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Article

Margaret Hohner and Panagiotis Tsigaris

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the beliefs of undergraduate business students studying in Canada and partners in China about the quality of the program; what…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the beliefs of undergraduate business students studying in Canada and partners in China about the quality of the program; what they consider effective signals of quality; and their willingness to pay to improve the quality.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was designed and distributed to 481 students in the transnational program during the 2009 and 2011 academic years. Statistical tests were conducted to examine mean differences in the perception of quality, different signals of quality and willingness to pay to improve quality.

Findings

The findings of the study indicate that Canadian University and Chinese partner students, mostly in their final years of study, have similar beliefs about the quality of the program. They consider the program as good quality but not top rated. Chinese partners' students in their earlier years of study have a lower perception of quality but this gets better as they progress through the program. Students perceive high quality reputation and professional accreditation as equally important in terms of signalling quality. Finally, many students are willing to pay more to improve the quality of the program.

Research limitations/implications

Some limitations of the study include convenience sample selection and size, translation of survey, the framing of the survey questions and controlling for factors such as grade point average, gender and other factors.

Practical implications

The paper provides important information to monitor quality and to place a value on pursuing accreditation and tuition fee increases.

Originality/value

Students' perception of quality has remained under‐examined in the literature. The research establishes a framework which can lead to future explorations.

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Article

Ahmed Al Kuwaiti and Fahd A. Al Muhanna

This paper aims to examine the challenges faced by health-care leadership in teaching hospitals in attaining accreditation for their institutions.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the challenges faced by health-care leadership in teaching hospitals in attaining accreditation for their institutions.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based on a study of current literature on health-care leadership, hospital accreditation and quality of patient care and identifies the challenges facing health-care leadership in attaining accreditation for teaching hospitals.

Findings

Based on a review and analysis of literature, infrastructure, finance, legal support, workforce recruitment and training, documentation and technology are identified as challenges faced by health-care leadership in teaching hospitals. The key challenges facing health-care leadership with respect to medical education and clinical research are found to be integration of education into hospital operations, compliance with all regulatory and professional requirements and adequacy of resources in executing research programs.

Originality/value

This study draws the attention of health-care leadership in teaching hospitals on the challenges they face in obtaining accreditation for their institutions so that they may develop appropriate strategies to overcome them.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

Keywords

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Article

Alexandr Akimov, Robert J. Bianchi and Michael E. Drew

The purpose of this paper is to comprehensively review one example of academic-industry cooperation, namely, the partnership arrangements between the CFA Institute and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to comprehensively review one example of academic-industry cooperation, namely, the partnership arrangements between the CFA Institute and universities around the globe. There is a scarcity of literature relating to academic-industry cooperation between the finance discipline and business.

Design/methodology/approach

Relevant data were hand-collected and a comprehensive analysis of individual CFA partner programs was undertaken, including the geographical distribution of the programs and program characteristics and ranking of partners programs; the motivation for and approaches of universities toward the CFA Institute partnership and program design are identified. The general findings are validated with a detailed analysis of the CFA partner postgraduate programs offered in Australian universities.

Findings

The research finds that the primary focus of cooperation between the CFA Institute and universities is the adoption of practitioner-relevant academic curriculum in universities, which should assist in setting industry educational standards. The authors observed a great diversity of partner institutions and programs around the globe, their rankings and their approach to cooperation with the CFA Institute thanks to the flexibility of their partnership arrangements. This explains the rapid growth of universities seeking formal cooperation with the CFA Institute. However, this growth has created challenges for the CFA Institute in managing and delivering value in their partnership arrangements.

Research limitations/implications

Due to data limitations, the research does not provide an empirical analysis of factors driving enrollments in Australian postgraduate finance programs.

Practical implications

The paper serves as a guide to universities interested in engaging in cooperation with the CFA Institute. This study is also useful for the professional bodies that evaluate various models of cooperation with educational institutions.

Originality/value

The paper is the first, to the authors' knowledge, to examine the practical aspects of cooperation between universities and a professional body in the finance discipline. Moreover, it is the first to evaluate perceived benefits and problems universities may experience by entering into a popular CFA Institute Partner Program.

Details

Journal of International Education in Business, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-469X

Keywords

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Article

Antony Luby

States that one of the outcomes of globalization and the increasing competition between higher education institutions (HEIs) has been a move towards the accreditation of…

Abstract

States that one of the outcomes of globalization and the increasing competition between higher education institutions (HEIs) has been a move towards the accreditation of teaching in higher education. HEIs in other countries may be interested to learn from the UK experience where there has been much acrimony “behind the scenes”, as various associations and organizations have battled for power. Unfortunately, the main losers in this battle have been the “chalkface academics” whose collective voice has been “crying in the wilderness”. This article attempts to redress the situation by reiterating the main findings of a national research project on accreditation; and it concludes by evaluating progress to date from the perspective of 18 months after the completion of the study.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

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