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Article
Publication date: 7 September 2015

Charbel Jose Chiappetta Jabbour, Ana Beatriz Lopes de Sousa Jabbour, Walter Leal Filho and Angappa Gunasekaran

The search for a more sustainable society depends on more sustainable organisations and, as such, Production (Industrial) Engineering may contribute to this process…

Abstract

Purpose

The search for a more sustainable society depends on more sustainable organisations and, as such, Production (Industrial) Engineering may contribute to this process through the training of professionals with a greater social and environmental consciousness. The purpose of this paper is to present arguments in favour of the integration of Production Engineering and the Millennium Development Goals and evaluate the potential of Production Engineering subareas in contributing to the Millennium Development Goals.

Design/methodology/approach

This work is conceptual and integrative in order to provide an original framework. A Brazilian perspective on Production Engineering has been adopted.

Findings

A framework is proposed to guide this integration process by providing suggestions for an agenda of opportunities for academics and practitioners in favour of a more sustainable society.

Originality/value

This work presents a new framework integrating Production Engineering and the Millennium Development Goals in order to promote a more sustainable training in Production (Industrial) Engineering field of research.

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Article
Publication date: 6 July 2015

Mario Henrique Mello, Jan Ola Strandhagen and Erlend Alfnes

Engineer-to-order (ETO) supply chains involve multiple companies for performing complex projects. The ability to effectively coordinate cross-business activities is…

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2400

Abstract

Purpose

Engineer-to-order (ETO) supply chains involve multiple companies for performing complex projects. The ability to effectively coordinate cross-business activities is essential to avoid delays, cost overruns and quality problems. Coordination is related to a number of contingent factors that need to be better comprehended. The purpose of this paper is to highlight such contingent factors and to analyse their effect on the occurrence of project delays.

Design/methodology/approach

A multiple case study is used to investigate the moderating factors affecting coordination in projects carried out in an ETO supply chain. Such factors are examined through a cross-analysis of six shipbuilding projects based on data from interviews, project documentation and clips from the media press.

Findings

In ETO supply chains, the engineering and production activities involve mutual interdependences that need to be coordinated. The findings suggest that both the integration of engineering and production and the production capability are the most critical factors influencing coordination in an ETO supply chain.

Research limitations/implications

The study was carried out within shipbuilding projects as a setting to represent the ETO domain. To extend the findings, further research can examine other types of projects, such as: oil and gas, construction, military and aerospace.

Practical implications

In practice, there is no “one-fits-all” solution for coordination. Each project represents a unique context which has specific objectives, actors and constraints. From that perspective, this study provides a basis to comprehend coordination in a complex setting.

Originality/value

This study builds knowledge upon coordination by generating a number of propositions regarding the effectiveness of coordination on avoiding delays in complex projects carried out in ETO supply chains. Focusing on the engineering and production activities, the authors extend the existing theory by demonstrating that coordination can vary according to the level of several moderating factors.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 35 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2005

Joakim Wikner and Martin Rudberg

Traditionally the customer order decoupling point (CODP) has focused mainly on the separation of production performed on speculation from commitment to customer orders…

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5565

Abstract

Purpose

Traditionally the customer order decoupling point (CODP) has focused mainly on the separation of production performed on speculation from commitment to customer orders. Engineering has, with few exceptions in this context, simply been viewed as occurring before production activities in a sequential manner. As competition increases, customer requirements for short lead‐times in combination with customisations requires further integration of processes involving both engineering and production activities making the traditional view of the CODP insufficient in these cases. The purpose of this paper is thus to provide a more general approach to enterprise integration of cross‐functional processes in order to extend the applicability of the CODP as a logistics oriented concept.

Design/methodology/approach

We use evolutionary approach to define the CODP as a two‐dimensional concept based on the integration of engineering and production.

Findings

The extended CODP captures the complexity in terms of possible configurations, but also provides a framework for the issues that must be handled when positioning the CODP in terms of both engineering and production simultaneously.

Practical implications

The two‐dimensional CODP is an important extension to make the theory better reflect reality and hence increase the scope and acceptance of both the concept CODP per se, and the analysis based on the CODP.

Originality/value

By the introduction of a new two‐dimensional approach, a more comprehensive CODP typology is defined. We also provide a classification of customer order influence based on a combined engineering and production perspective where the efficient CODPs constitute a set providing the highest level of customer value in terms of engineering adaptations.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 25 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1997

Johann C.K.H. Riedel and Kulwant S. Pawar

Reports on research based on the results of a survey of design management in the UK mechanical engineering industry. Considers the issue of which aspects of production

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1649

Abstract

Reports on research based on the results of a survey of design management in the UK mechanical engineering industry. Considers the issue of which aspects of production were considered in the design of products and when. Demonstrates that at the prototype stage production aspects became the most important. This shows that the manufacturability of the product is not considered until after it has been designed. Concludes that the effective and efficient manufacture of the product is not given sufficient attention by mechanical engineering firms. Also investigates the involvement of production personnel in the design process. Finds that production engineering was more extensively involved in the design process the closer it moved towards manufacture. Points to further research which hopes to address this lack by providing practical tools for the application of concurrent engineering.

Details

Integrated Manufacturing Systems, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-6061

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 April 2015

Mario Henrique Mello, Jan Ola Strandhagen and Erlend Alfnes

ETO supply chains produce high-value products on a project basis. The occurrence of delays is a major problem that impacts the performance of a company and its supply…

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1698

Abstract

Purpose

ETO supply chains produce high-value products on a project basis. The occurrence of delays is a major problem that impacts the performance of a company and its supply chain. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the cause of delays and to understand the role of coordination to mitigate them.

Design/methodology/approach

An in-depth case study was conducted to identify problems that delay a project and to examine such problems from a systemic perspective. Based on data from interviews, group meetings, field observations and documentation, a pattern is proposed to explain the relation between coordination and lead time.

Findings

Conceptually, to reduce the project lead time a higher level of concurrency is necessary. However, more concurrency increases the interdependencies between activities, something which demands more coordination effort. Since the coordination mechanisms applied are not appropriate to cope with the increasing coordination effort, a number of problems appear causing reworks and delays which increase the lead time.

Research limitations/implications

The main limitation is that the authors are not able to distinguish which particular project characteristic influences the adoption of a specific coordination mechanism. Further research is required to examine the effect of various coordination mechanisms across a higher number of projects.

Practical implications

Practitioners can benefit from discussions in this study to comprehend how coordination can improve the delivery performance in ETO supply chains.

Originality/value

This study contributes to a better understanding of coordination in ETO supply chains by making sense of problems that delay the project. Matching the coordination mechanisms with the required coordination effort, which is based on the project characteristics, is a way to avoid delays and reduce the lead time.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 June 2020

Per Engelseth, Jan-Åke Törnroos and Yufeng Zhang

The purpose of this research is to detect, through applying a process-based view, how to manage economisation of the maintenance and modification operations in offshore…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to detect, through applying a process-based view, how to manage economisation of the maintenance and modification operations in offshore petroleum logistics operations.

Design/methodology/approach

A single case study of engineering services, more specifically, maintenance and modification service operations, on a Norwegian Sea oil platform reveals the dynamics of building network capabilities in a consistent network structure. Two layers of coordination are studied: the engineering process and its context, represented by its network of interconnected firms. This case study empirically grounds how engineering service involves managing reciprocally interdependent exchange processes in the network structure.

Findings

Pooled interdependencies are vital in understanding the nature of service provision and use, and sequential interdependencies are vital in narrating the timing of processes to reveal the nature of process emergence to coordinate strings of production events. Furthermore, the network structure, when characterised by multiple interdependent projects, is also dynamic but at a slower pace.

Originality/value

Through the case study, operations management is revealed to be associated with project emergence at two levels: the core process level regarding daily continuous change, including the changing interaction of multiple different and interdependent projects, and the contextual level, where features of interdependency and integration change, affecting engineering service production. This provides guidance as to the economisation of engineering services. They change not only interactions in the flow of production but also its context.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 32 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 12 April 2018

Luís Grochocki, Jorge Guimarães, Alvaro Prata and João Oliveira

Engineering is a powerful instrument for promoting the social and economic development of nations. Its enhancement is a strategic element to accelerate Brazil’s progress…

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3831

Abstract

Purpose

Engineering is a powerful instrument for promoting the social and economic development of nations. Its enhancement is a strategic element to accelerate Brazil’s progress. This paper aims to present a new perspective on the topic of “Engineering and Development in Brazil, Challenges and Prospects” (Guimarães et al., 2007). Its goal is to discuss the need for restructuring the Brazilian system for research, development and innovation (RD&I) and the training of human resources in engineering in the country.

Design/methodology/approach

This article is designed to discuss the relations between the performance of the industrial sector and the maturation of engineering in Brazil by looking at the national scientific production in the area in comparison to the world production and to countries (South Korea and The Netherlands). Finally, in terms of training human resources, the Brazilian study abroad program Science without Borders program is discussed in the article as an important tool for the qualification of engineering students in Brazil.

Findings

A few of the main findings in this research are as follows: despite being among the top 20 countries in scientific production in Engineering, Brazil still lacks turning this scientific-technological knowledge into products and patents; Brazilian universities and research institutes must build interorganizational collaborations with the industrial sector to increase innovation in the field of engineering; The distribution of the investment in RD&I in engineering must be strategically distributed among its various fields, taking into account national strategies and the technological interrelations between them. The article concludes that engineering is a powerful instrument for promoting a country’s social development while offering indications about Brazilian strategic orientation in the development of engineering.

Originality/value

Despite already being well known that engineering is a powerful instrument for promoting a country’s social development, this article innovates by associating academic scientific production in engineering to other variables related to economic development, such as gross domestic product, human development index, industrial and manufactured production and the filing of patents. It comes at an important moment when the Brazilian Government is discussing new strategies to increase social and economic development in the country while controlling for the investment in RD&I. Therefore, it is the right moment to discuss national policies in science, technology and innovation, especially in the area of engineering.

Details

Innovation & Management Review, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2515-8961

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1994

Delavar G. Shenas and Sepehr Derakhshan

Discusses the advent of simultaneous engineering as the newmanufacturing paradigm, and speculates about the organizationalconsequences of this new manufacturing method. To…

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785

Abstract

Discusses the advent of simultaneous engineering as the new manufacturing paradigm, and speculates about the organizational consequences of this new manufacturing method. To decrease the time from product inspection through prototype manufacture, it is necessary to instil a knowledge of process capabilities into the design process. Simultaneous engineering stresses design of product and production process together with design of assembly, quality control, and field service, that is the complete production cycle. There are many ways that a product can be designed to allow simplification of the product manufacture. This new method has necessitated new forms of internal organization of the company through blurring between different divisions of a company and the creation of multifunctional teams composed of domain experts from every stage of production. This new manufacturing mode has also redefined the relationship between the companies and their vendors. Because of greater technological interdependence, and even without any formal ties, concludes that long‐term relationships are becoming more and more important in many industries.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 14 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 24 August 2018

Eduardo Guilherme Satolo, Caroline Leite, Robisom Damasceno Calado, Gustavo Antiqueira Goes and Douglas D’Alessandro Salgado

The lean production system and world class manufacturing (WCM) have been prominent in recent studies due to their conceptual synergy. However, although the number of…

Abstract

Purpose

The lean production system and world class manufacturing (WCM) have been prominent in recent studies due to their conceptual synergy. However, although the number of studies is increasing, the research is immature, especially regarding the interaction between topics. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to rank the tools of the lean production system, indicating how they help organizations achieve WCM, using the theory of grey systems.

Design/methodology/approach

Therefore, the authors conducted an initial survey to collect data to determine how the lean production tools are related to the WCM pillars. These data were analyzed by the grey relational analysis statistical method, which passes through the construction of four stages.

Findings

The results show that of the lean production tools, stream mapping, kaizen, total productive maintenance, Six Sigma, standardized work and 5S stand out for their use and implementation in the organizational environment and facilitate organizations’ transitions to world-class performance through the WCM pillars.

Practical implications

The results achieved guide organizations to use the tools of the lean production system to help them reach world class status.

Originality/value

This paper stands out in the field of operations management, specifically in the research on lean production, by making use of the theory of grey correlation system in an innovative and original way. In addition, it promotes the consolidation of information on two of the main administrative strategies currently employed in the organizational environment.

Details

Grey Systems: Theory and Application, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2043-9377

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1943

H. Rissik

THE statistical method of controlling product quality during manufacture—a technique commonly known by the shorter title, Quality Control—is a very recent development in…

Abstract

THE statistical method of controlling product quality during manufacture—a technique commonly known by the shorter title, Quality Control—is a very recent development in the field of production engineering. In point of fact the first application of this technique to machine‐shop production in this country took place late in 1940 at the Croydon works of Messrs. Creed & Co. Ltd., a firm whose name is a household word in electrical communications, for the Creed teleprinter is known all over the world. At the same time it must not be thought that quality control as such, or the use of the so‐called quality control chart as an aid to manufacture, is a purely wartime development. Statistical methods have been employed in British industry, notably in electric lamp manufacture, and in the production of both cotton and woollen textiles, for more than fifteen years, whilst the technique of quality control itself was originated by Dr. W. A. Shewhart of the Bell Telephone Laboratories, New York, in 1922. But where engineering practice was concerned, the application of statistical methods did not present itself until quite recently as a necessary or even convenient solution of manufacturing difficulties.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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