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Article
Publication date: 9 April 2018

James M. Wilson

The purpose is to provide an intellectual history of Operations Management, particularly noting recent developments and its underlying continuity with earlier systems and

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose is to provide an intellectual history of Operations Management, particularly noting recent developments and its underlying continuity with earlier systems and thinking. Operations Management as a discipline identifies its “modern” incarnation as dating from the 1960s when it became more rigorous and managerially focused. This re-invention constructed a “narrative” that the profession still follows, yet a critical perspective reveals significant, though under-appreciated continuity with earlier theory and practice.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents a comprehensive literature review and comparative analysis of historic developments in management and academia.

Findings

In the early 1900s, F. W. Taylor’s Shop Management established Operation Management, but its main component, Scientific Management, had stagnated by the 1950s. At that point, the rise of Management Science both reinvigorated Operations Management and threatened it with a competing new discipline. To compete Operations Management then modernized by redefining itself, reasserting its interest in several areas and co-opting Operational Research tools for those. It also contracted, withdrawing from areas considered vocational, or more suited to Industrial Engineering.

Research limitations/implications

This historical overview shows the critical importance of drawing research agenda from practical managerial concerns.

Practical implications

Practitioners benefit from the intellectual rigor that academics provide and a historical perspective shows that the relationship has been mutually beneficial.

Social implications

The disciplines of Operations Management, Operations Research and Industrial Engineering are complementary and competitive in addressing many problems that transcend their boundaries, and use common ideas and techniques. The demands of “academic rigor” have had a deleterious effect on the practical managerial relevance of these disciplines.

Originality/value

A long-term, cross-disciplinary perspective provides a unique understanding of the research interests and practical orientations of these disciplines.

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

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Book part
Publication date: 20 October 2015

Mohammad Shamsuddoha

Contemporary literature reveals that, to date, the poultry livestock sector has not received sufficient research attention. This particular industry suffers from…

Abstract

Contemporary literature reveals that, to date, the poultry livestock sector has not received sufficient research attention. This particular industry suffers from unstructured supply chain practices, lack of awareness of the implications of the sustainability concept and failure to recycle poultry wastes. The current research thus attempts to develop an integrated supply chain model in the context of poultry industry in Bangladesh. The study considers both sustainability and supply chain issues in order to incorporate them in the poultry supply chain. By placing the forward and reverse supply chains in a single framework, existing problems can be resolved to gain economic, social and environmental benefits, which will be more sustainable than the present practices.

The theoretical underpinning of this research is ‘sustainability’ and the ‘supply chain processes’ in order to examine possible improvements in the poultry production process along with waste management. The research adopts the positivist paradigm and ‘design science’ methods with the support of system dynamics (SD) and the case study methods. Initially, a mental model is developed followed by the causal loop diagram based on in-depth interviews, focus group discussions and observation techniques. The causal model helps to understand the linkages between the associated variables for each issue. Finally, the causal loop diagram is transformed into a stock and flow (quantitative) model, which is a prerequisite for SD-based simulation modelling. A decision support system (DSS) is then developed to analyse the complex decision-making process along the supply chains.

The findings reveal that integration of the supply chain can bring economic, social and environmental sustainability along with a structured production process. It is also observed that the poultry industry can apply the model outcomes in the real-life practices with minor adjustments. This present research has both theoretical and practical implications. The proposed model’s unique characteristics in mitigating the existing problems are supported by the sustainability and supply chain theories. As for practical implications, the poultry industry in Bangladesh can follow the proposed supply chain structure (as par the research model) and test various policies via simulation prior to its application. Positive outcomes of the simulation study may provide enough confidence to implement the desired changes within the industry and their supply chain networks.

Details

Sustaining Competitive Advantage Via Business Intelligence, Knowledge Management, and System Dynamics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-707-3

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Article
Publication date: 27 November 2018

Diego Augusto de Jesus Pacheco, Isaac Pergher, José Antônio Valle Antunes Junior and Guilherme Luís Roehe Vaccaro

The purpose of this study is to compare different models integrating the TOC and Lean approaches.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to compare different models integrating the TOC and Lean approaches.

Design/methodology/approach

The models of reference were identified through a comprehensive literature review. A qualitative and comparative analysis was carried out by pointing out the strengths, weaknesses and gaps of models integrating the TOC and Lean based on the production system requirements.

Findings

The findings indicate that these models can be improved by introducing aspects related to the system structure such as main key performance indicators, type of shop layout and performance metrics to evaluate the improvements implemented in the production system. The results provided evidence that the TOC and Lean are complementary approaches, and the individual gaps of each approach seem to be, in the most part, offset by the virtues of the other.

Practical implications

This study enables decision makers and industrial managers to evaluate the practices adopted in the production environment, as well as the use of the different set of continuous improvement practices. This article also minimizes the literature gap regarding whether and how integrated Lean and TOC approach can be used in the firms.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the body of literature on Lean by comparing three different models integrating Lean and the TOC. Furthermore, a research agenda is suggested for future research aimed at developing new models integrating both approaches, aiming to increase the competitiveness of the production systems.

Details

International Journal of Lean Six Sigma, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-4166

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2018

Joy M. Field, Liana Victorino, Ryan W. Buell, Michael J. Dixon, Susan Meyer Goldstein, Larry J. Menor, Madeleine E. Pullman, Aleda V. Roth, Enrico Secchi and Jie J. Zhang

The purpose of this paper is to present exciting and innovative research questions in service operations that are aligned with eight key themes and related topics…

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4026

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present exciting and innovative research questions in service operations that are aligned with eight key themes and related topics determined by the Journal of Service Management (JOSM) Service Operations Expert Research Panel. By offering a good number of such research questions, this paper provides a broad range of ideas to spur conceptual and empirical research related to service operations and encourage the continued creation of deep knowledge within the field, as well as collaborative research across disciplines that develops and incorporates insights from service operations.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a Delphi study, described in the companion article, “Service Operations: What Have We Learned?,” the panel identified eight key research themes in service operations where leading-edge research is being done or has yet to be done (Victorino et al., 2018). In this paper, three or four topics within each theme are selected and multiple questions for each topic are proposed to guide research efforts. The topics and questions, while wide-ranging, are only representative of the many ongoing research opportunities related to service operations.

Findings

The field of service operations has many interesting research topics and questions that are largely unexplored. Furthermore, these research areas are not only increasingly integrative across multiple themes within operations but often transcend functional disciplines. This creates opportunities for ever more impactful research with a greater reach throughout the service system and suggests that service researchers, regardless of functional affiliation, can contribute to the ongoing conversation on the role of service operations in value creation.

Originality/value

Leveraging the collective knowledge of the JOSM Service Operations Expert Research Panel to expand on the research themes generated from the Delphi study, novel questions for future study are put forward. Recognizing that the number of potential research questions is virtually unlimited, summary questions by theme and topic are also provided. These questions represent a synopsis of the individual questions and can serve as a quick reference guide for researchers interested in pursuing new directions in conceptual and empirical research in service operations. This summary also serves as a framework to facilitate the formulation of additional research topics and questions.

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Article
Publication date: 12 July 2021

Marisel Fernandez-Giordano, Mark Stevenson, Leopoldo Gutierrez and Javier Llorens-Montes

The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, to evaluate the roles of a transactive memory system and the supply network flexibility (SNF) of the firm as antecedents of a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, to evaluate the roles of a transactive memory system and the supply network flexibility (SNF) of the firm as antecedents of a firm’s supply chain agility (FSCA), also incorporating the moderating role of the transactive memory system; and, second, to evaluate the relationship between FSCA and operations performance (OP).

Design/methodology/approach

Four hypothesized relationships are tested with survey data from 190 high-tech firms using structural equation models.

Findings

FSCA can be enhanced through the transactive memory system and SNF, although a higher degree of transactive memory system weakens the positive relationship between SNF and FSCA. A positive relationship is identified between FSCA and OP, while FSCA mediates the relationship between SNF and OP.

Practical implications

Managers can increase FSCA and improve OP by developing both the transactive memory system and SNF. Given that firms have limited resources, investment in internal capabilities should be prioritized as this appears to be more effective at developing FSCA.

Originality/value

The findings expand the literature by exploring two antecedents of FSCA and by analyzing the impact of FSCA on different measures of OP. Few prior studies have highlighted the importance of the transactive memory system to the operations function.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Article
Publication date: 15 October 2021

Yuan Huang, Daniel R. Eyers, Mark Stevenson and Matthias Thürer

The study aims to examine a discrepant industrial case that demonstrates how to achieve economies of scale with additive manufacturing (AM), thereby expanding the scope of…

Abstract

Purpose

The study aims to examine a discrepant industrial case that demonstrates how to achieve economies of scale with additive manufacturing (AM), thereby expanding the scope of AM beyond high-variety, customised production contexts.

Design/methodology/approach

Abductive reasoning is applied to analyse a case of using AM to compete with conventional production, winning a contract to supply 7,700,000 products. Comparing this case to existing theories and contemporary practices reveals new research directions and practical insights.

Findings

Economies of scale were realised through a combination of technological innovation and the adoption of operations management practices atypical of AM shops (e.g. design for volume, low-cost resource deployment and material flow optimisation). The former improved AM process parameters in terms of time, cost and dependability; the latter improved the entire manufacturing system, including non-AM operations/resources. This system-wide improvement has been largely overlooked in the literature, where AM is typically viewed as a disruptive technology that simplifies manufacturing processes and shortens supply chains.

Originality/value

It is empirically shown that an AM shop can achieve economies of scale and compete with conventional manufacturing in high-volume, standardised production contexts.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1988

T.W. Batley and T.P. Mangos

The main objective of a 1986 survey of production and operations managers throughout New Zealand industry was to determine the extent of computer use. The survey explored…

Abstract

The main objective of a 1986 survey of production and operations managers throughout New Zealand industry was to determine the extent of computer use. The survey explored the use of microcomputers, mini computers and mainframes by production managers. Job title and responsibilities of the manager responsible for the majority of production management functions were investigated. It appeared that information and decision making in production management was fragmented in most organisations. The survey examined the main uses of computer information and control systems in production planning and inventory control, the perceived benefits and problems. The main computer brands in use and types of software were also analysed. Comparisons were made with surveys of British companies and some work in the USA.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 8 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 3 May 2021

Marcos Eduardo Finger, Daniel Pacheco Lacerda, Luis Riehs Camargo, Fábio Sartori Piran, Ricardo Augusto Cassel and Maria Isabel Wolf Motta Morandi

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relations in the Marketing/Operations interface through the analysis of data of the operational reality of a Brazilian…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relations in the Marketing/Operations interface through the analysis of data of the operational reality of a Brazilian company with a low technological intensity. The study aims to quantify and determine the impacts of marketing decisions on delivery performance and on flexibility of the operations area.

Design/methodology/approach

A longitudinal case study was conducted and the variables used in the model were derived from established theories and were evaluated with artificial neural networks. The case of a food manufacturing company was selected to reflect the relations in the marketing/operations interface of a low technological intensity enterprise.

Findings

The results show that the decisions on Place/Channel, Price and Product dimensions of marketing exert a significant impact on flexibility and delivery performance of the operation area.

Research limitations/implications

The findings of the case study cannot be generalised and the outcomes are specific to just one firm. However, the approach lends itself to replication, particularly within low technological intensity companies.

Originality/value

Prior studies have focussed on coordination among functional areas as marketing and operations at higher levels of abstraction. The study contemplate empirical propositions through the data analysis of a company with a low technological intensity that can be used to improve managers' decisions and alignment in the Marketing/Operation Interface.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

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Article
Publication date: 15 October 2020

Daqiang Guo, Mingxing Li, Ray Zhong and G.Q. Huang

The purpose of this paper is to develop an intelligent manufacturing system for transforming production management and operations to an Industry 4.0 manufacturing paradigm.

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430

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop an intelligent manufacturing system for transforming production management and operations to an Industry 4.0 manufacturing paradigm.

Design/methodology/approach

A manufacturing mode-Graduation Manufacturing System is designed for organizing and controlling production operations. An Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) and digital twin-enabled Graduation Intelligent Manufacturing System (GiMS) with real-time task allocation and execution mechanisms is proposed to achieve real-time information sharing and production planning, scheduling, execution and control with reduced complexity and uncertainty.

Findings

The implementation of GiMS in an industrial company illustrates the potential advantages for real-time production planning, scheduling, execution and control with reduced complexity and uncertainty. For production managers and onsite operators, effective tools, such as cloud services integrates effective production and operations management strategies are needed to facilitate their decision-making and daily operations at the operational level.

Originality/value

This paper presents an Industry 4.0 paradigm-GiMS, which aims to explore Industry 4.0 technologies opportunities on operations and production management, especially on production planning, scheduling, execution and control.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 121 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

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