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Article
Publication date: 28 August 2007

Xiaoyu Yang, Philip R. Moore, Chi‐Biu Wong, Jun‐Sheng Pu and Seng Kwong Chong

This paper aims to capture and manage the product lifecycle data for consumer products, especially data that occur in distribution, usage, maintenance and end‐of‐life…

5564

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to capture and manage the product lifecycle data for consumer products, especially data that occur in distribution, usage, maintenance and end‐of‐life stages, and to use them to provide information and knowledge.

Design/methodology/approach

A lifecycle information acquisition and management model is proposed, and an information management system framework is formulated. The information management system developed is then used in actual field trials to manage lifecycle data for refrigeration products and game consoles.

Findings

It has been demonstrated that valuable services can be delivered through a lifecycle information management system.

Practical implications

Lifecycle information management systems can open new horizons for product design which are sustainable and environmentally sensitive. They also contribute to the wider exploration of eco‐design and development of next generation consumer products (e.g. smart home appliances).

Originality/value

Existing lifecycle information systems cannot support all phases of the product lifecycle. They mainly manage the lifecycle data only during the design and manufacture stages. Lifecycle data during distribution, usage, maintenance and end‐of‐life stages are usually hard to acquire and in most cases lost. The lifecycle information management system developed can capture them, and manage them in an integrated and systematic manner to provide information and knowledge.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 107 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 July 2013

Martin Hubert Ofner, Kevin Straub, Boris Otto and Hubert Oesterle

The purpose of the paper is to propose a reference model describing a holistic view of the master data lifecycle, including strategic, tactical and operational aspects…

2934

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to propose a reference model describing a holistic view of the master data lifecycle, including strategic, tactical and operational aspects. The Master Data Lifecycle Management (MDLM) map provides a structured approach to analyze the master data lifecycle.

Design/methodology/approach

Embedded in a design oriented research process, the paper applies the Component Business Model (CBM) method and suggests a reference model which identifies the business components required to manage the master data lifecycle. CBM is a patented IBM method to analyze the key components of a business domain. The paper uses a participative case study to evaluate the suggested model.

Findings

Based on a participative case study, the paper shows how the reference model makes it possible to analyze the master data lifecycle on a strategic, a tactical and an operational level, and how it helps identify areas of improvement.

Research limitations/implications

The paper presents design work and a participative case study. The reference model is grounded in existing literature and represents a comprehensive framework forming the foundation for future analysis of the master data lifecycle. Furthermore, the model represents an abstraction of an organization's master data lifecycle. Hence, it forms a “theory for designing”. More research is needed in order to more thoroughly evaluate the presented model in a variety of real‐life settings.

Practical implications

The paper shows how the reference model enables practitioners to analyze the master data lifecycle and how it helps identify areas of improvement.

Originality/value

The paper reports on an attempt to establish a holistic view of the master data lifecycle, including strategic, tactical and operational aspects, in order to provide more comprehensive support for its analysis and improvement.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 April 2012

Pierre Hadaya and Philippe Marchildon

This study attempts to expand knowledge of product lifecycle management (PLM) and supporting systems. Its objective is threefold: first, to identify and assess the impact…

3984

Abstract

Purpose

This study attempts to expand knowledge of product lifecycle management (PLM) and supporting systems. Its objective is threefold: first, to identify and assess the impact of two key PLM building blocks on new product performance. Second, to use the aforementioned PLM building blocks to highlight the distinctive nature of PLM and closed‐loop PLM systems. Third, to demonstrate that the closed‐loop PLM system provides more new product benefits than the PLM system and that the usage of the closed‐loop PLM system is positively related to new product development.

Design/methodology/approach

The research hypotheses were tested on data collected from 87 manufacturers in the transportation equipment manufacturing industry in one Canadian province.

Findings

The findings show that only ten manufacturers have adopted a closed‐loop PLM system. As expected, the results show that the two key PLM building blocks, namely operational integration and information system (IS) usage, are positively related to new product development. Findings also show that the level of forward operational integration is similar in the closed‐loop PLM system and in the PLM system, while the level of backward operational integration, the usage of the PLM system and new product development are higher in the closed‐loop PLM system. Finally, the results demonstrate that the usage of the closed‐loop PLM system is positively related to new product development.

Originality/value

This contribution should give academics and practitioners alike a better understanding of the role and benefits of PLM and its supporting systems (the PLM system and the closed‐loop PLM system).

Article
Publication date: 14 October 2014

Yufeng Zhang and Lihong Zhang

Strategic trends towards service operations have been widely reported in the recent literature, but organisational capabilities to support such service-centred strategies…

1102

Abstract

Purpose

Strategic trends towards service operations have been widely reported in the recent literature, but organisational capabilities to support such service-centred strategies are less well understood. The purpose of this paper is to identify key organisational issues in managing complex engineering service operations throughout the lifecycle.

Design/methodology/approach

Using instruments developed from the product lifecycle management technologies and the network configuration concept, key organisational issues for engineering service operations were identified through case studies focusing on complex engineering products and services systems across a variety of industrial sectors.

Findings

The case studies demonstrated different organisational features and strategic priorities of engineering service operations along the whole lifecycle. A generic trend has been observed for engineering systems to move from being design, development and manufacturing focused to embracing support and end-of-life recycling matters.

Originality/value

This paper provides an overall framework for integrating key organisational issues in engineering service operations. It contributes to the service literature by highlighting the need of developing appropriate organisational capabilities to support service-centred strategies with engineering cases. It also provides guidance for companies to manage their engineering network operations throughout the whole lifecycle of complex products and services systems.

Article
Publication date: 5 May 2020

Jo Conlon

Product lifecycle management (PLM) is an enterprise-wide strategy gaining prominence across manufacturing. The fashion industry is a late adopter of PLM, yet within global…

Abstract

Purpose

Product lifecycle management (PLM) is an enterprise-wide strategy gaining prominence across manufacturing. The fashion industry is a late adopter of PLM, yet within global fashion and textile organisations PLM is now becoming a mainstream approach to optimize core processes. This literature review analyses the latest academic research to establish a broad basis of understanding of PLM in the sector and identify potential future research directions.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic literature review was conducted to investigate the current state and main perspectives of research on PLM in the textiles and apparel sector. The paper adopts the three features (managerial, technological and collaborative) of the definition of PLM by Corallo et al. (2013) as the analytic framework for the 27 papers to illustrate how PLM is framed and conceptualised in the RFA sector.

Findings

PLM is at an interesting phase as it evolves from classical PLM 1.0 to connected PLM 2.0. The evolution of PLM from its PDM origins as an IT tool to a critical component of the strategy for digital transformation is reported. The strategic role of suppliers is noted as a critical success factor. Key inhibitors relating to PLM adoption and optimization in the sector are identified as limited holistic and theoretical perspective of PLM coupled with a deficiency in relevant industry skills. It is argued that the transformational potential of PLM 2.0 may not be fully realised without a more coordinated development effort through industrial and academic collaboration.

Research limitations/implications

The limitations of this study are that it is a literature review of academic papers in the RFA sector papers within the timescale 2000–2018. PLM 1.0 has dominated in this time period however the potential trajectory of connected PLM 2.0 is beginning to emerge.

Practical implications

The results from this paper indicate that there is a lack of research on PLM in the sector and concludes by suggesting promising future research possibilities: further empirical and case studies on organisations implementing a PLM strategy; studies reporting on the contribution of PLM to address the challenges of sustainability, traceability and transparency in the industry and inter-industry collaborations; studies with knowledge management theories specifically applied to the textile and apparel sector; and the opportunity for academic and industry collaboration on the development of PLM to meet these needs.

Originality/value

To the best of the author's knowledge, no systematic literature review on this topic has previously been published in academic journals. Given levels of investment in PLM platforms in the sector, both practitioners in companies and the academic community might find the review and agenda for future research useful.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 April 2012

Boris Otto

The paper seeks to investigate the question as to how the business benefits of product data management (PDM) can be assessed and realized. In particular, it aims at…

2193

Abstract

Purpose

The paper seeks to investigate the question as to how the business benefits of product data management (PDM) can be assessed and realized. In particular, it aims at understanding the means‐end relationship between PDM and product data on the one hand and a company's business goals on the other hand.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses a case study research approach. The case of Festo is unique and allows for detailed examination of both the business benefits of PDM and of the inter‐dependencies of various business benefit enablers. Due to the limited amount of scientific knowledge with regard to the management of PDM business benefits, the study is exploratory in nature. The conceptual framework used to guide the study combines business engineering concepts and the business dependency network technique.

Findings

The findings are threefold. First, the paper explicates and details the understanding of the nature of PDM business benefits. Second, it provides insight into the complexity and interdependency of various “means” – such as data ownership, product data standards, for example – and the “ends” of PDM, namely the contribution to a company's business goals. Third, the paper forms the baseline for a comprehensive method supporting the management of PDM business benefits.

Research limitations/implications

Single‐case studies require further validation of findings. Thus, future research should aim at replicating the findings and at developing a comprehensive method for the management of PDM business benefits.

Practical implications

Companies may take up the results as a “blueprint” for their own PDM activities and may reflect their own business benefits against the case of Festo.

Originality/value

The paper is one of the first contributions focusing on the means‐end relationship between PDM and product data on the one hand and a company's business goals on the other.

Article
Publication date: 2 September 2021

Ferran Vendrell-Herrero, Emanuel Gomes, Marco Opazo-Basaez and Oscar F. Bustinza

The purpose of this paper is to distinguish clearly between industry (ILC) and product lifecycle (PLC) models and to elucidate their different ramifications for…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to distinguish clearly between industry (ILC) and product lifecycle (PLC) models and to elucidate their different ramifications for organizational learning and knowledge.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors examine existing knowledge on ILCs and PLCs to highlight the differences and similarities and develop a framework with implications for learning and innovation in digital manufacturing industries.

Findings

The authors identify and associate one dominant type of learning with each phase of the ILC: learning-by-participating in the introduction phase, learning-by-feedback in the growth phase, vicarious learning in the maturity phase and learning-by-memory in the decline phase. The study also provides insight into how different types of learning influence PLC in digital innovation. From this perspective, learning-by-feedback is crucial to co-creation, co-production and open innovation. Similarly, learning-by-doing and learning-by-memory are essential to production and usage stages, respectively.

Research limitations/implications

The conceptual development in this paper follows a somewhat critical but ultimately elucidative analysis that highlights important research avenues in the interplay of PLC/ILC, organizational learning and digital innovation.

Originality/value

This paper clarifies a perennial theoretical problem by differentiating two concepts often conflated in the literature. More importantly, it contributes to the knowledge management literature by shedding light on the connection of ILC and PLC theories to different types of organizational learning.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 26 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 July 2018

Giuditta Pezzotta, Claudio Sassanelli, Fabiana Pirola, Roberto Sala, Monica Rossi, Sophia Fotia, Angelos Koutoupes, Sergio Terzi and Dimitris Mourtzis

Nowadays manufacturers companies are increasingly compelled to navigate towards servitization. Different methods and approaches were proposed in literature to support them…

1710

Abstract

Purpose

Nowadays manufacturers companies are increasingly compelled to navigate towards servitization. Different methods and approaches were proposed in literature to support them to switch from traditional product-based business model to product service systems (PSSs). However, new knowledge, capabilities and skills were needed to consistently develop PSSs, since they need a joint focus on both customer’s perspective and company’s internal performance and at the same time a proper support for the integration of product and service design. The purpose of this paper is to propose the Product Service System Lean Design Methodology (PSSLDM), a structured methodology to develop PSSs along their entire lifecycle.

Design/methodology/approach

Retrieving concepts from interpretative, interactive and system development research traditions, and strongly reminding the design research methodology framework, the adopted research methodology is composed of three main phases (observation and conceptualization, theory building and tool development, validation) and involved three heterogeneous companies.

Findings

This paper provides an overview of the PSSLDM, explaining how the different methods supporting its conduction should contribute to properly design an integrated PSS. Moreover, companies highlighted several benefits in the different stages along the PSS lifecycle deriving by the adoption of the PSSLDM.

Research limitations/implications

The development of a platform based on the PSSLDM methodology raises a discussion on the possible changes needed by current Product Lifecycle Management (PLM) models and systems when they have to do with PSSs.

Originality/value

The PSSLDM enriches the already proposed SErvice Engineering Methodology, introducing new several components linked by lean rules in each of its phases (starting from customer analysis, going through solution concept and detailed design, until the offering analysis) and better supprting the deatil design of both prodcut and service components.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 29 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 August 2021

Ganesh Tanpure, Vinod Yadav, Rakesh Jain and Gunjan Soni

The Product Lifecycle Management (PLM) system has found varieties of deployments in various domains of product-based industries. Current study aims to provide a framework…

Abstract

Purpose

The Product Lifecycle Management (PLM) system has found varieties of deployments in various domains of product-based industries. Current study aims to provide a framework for the adoption of PLM systems in manufacturing organizations to meet the actual requirements of industries.

Design/methodology/approach

First, a systematic review of extant literature was performed, and further, the case study approach is opted to study the process of New Product Development (NPD) in a manufacturing organization. Triangulation methodology was adopted wherein the interview results, actual observations, and authorized documentations were used to validate the result and provide conclusions.

Findings

A conceptual framework and implementation architecture for PLM is derived. The complete ecosystem for digital footprint is mapped for New Product Development (NPD) activities.

Practical implications

The study could be helpful for Techno-Functional Managers. For individuals with only functional/technical knowledge, additional training might be required to adopt the framework in actual practices.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the existing literature by providing a framework and demonstrating the feasibility of implementation through the case study.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 29 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 October 2011

Swee Siong Kuik, Sev Verl Nagalingam and Yousef Amer

Owing to the manufacturing trend of stringent product disposal regulations, a new business scenario, which requires an alternative disposal option on consumer products and…

5699

Abstract

Purpose

Owing to the manufacturing trend of stringent product disposal regulations, a new business scenario, which requires an alternative disposal option on consumer products and further product recovery operations, is increasingly important for promoting sustainable supply chain performance. The purpose of this paper is to explore the use to post‐use stage of the product lifecycle, that may have significant potential for increasing product utilisation value and reducing product disposal to landfills.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper proposes a re‐classification of the 6R (reduce, recover, redesign, reuse, recycle, remanufacturing) methodology for rectifying waste minimisation along a supply chain, to increase product utilisation at the post‐use stage.

Findings

Intensive study of 6R considerations to improve end‐of‐life planning and strategy and extend of product lifecycle management is lacking. None of the existing supply chain frameworks clearly illustrates the aspects of 6R perspectives for the use to post‐use stage.

Research limitations/implications

The main limitation is that this study only focuses on 6R perspective for achieving waste minimisation along a supply chain. There is a need to explore various practical issues of the implementation, including the establishment of specific performance metrics for various manufacturing industries to assess organisational performance.

Practical implications

This proposed sustainable supply chain for collaborative manufacturing may provide a very useful source of what needs to be implemented and achieved to meet the requirements of sustainability, which is the current and future trend of manufacturing.

Originality/value

This paper provides some of the insights into holistic aspects of 6R perspective to increase product utilisation value between use and post‐use stages.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 22 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

Keywords

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