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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1999

Alan Ching Biu Tse

Examines how perceived product safety may be affected by such product‐related factors as price, brand name, store name, promotion channels, source credibility, country of…

Abstract

Examines how perceived product safety may be affected by such product‐related factors as price, brand name, store name, promotion channels, source credibility, country of origin, nature of product testing authority and warranty. Shows that perceived product safety was significantly affected by all of the variables mentioned above. Implies that, by carefully manipulating these variables in formulating marketing strategies, managers can attract the large and growing market of safety‐conscious consumers and gain a competitive edge that cannot possibly be ignored.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 33 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 16 March 2012

Huanan Liu, William A. Kerr and Jill E. Hobbs

The rapid transition from a command to market‐based economy in China has required the development of a food safety system for aquatic products where one did not previously…

Abstract

Purpose

The rapid transition from a command to market‐based economy in China has required the development of a food safety system for aquatic products where one did not previously exist. The pace of change has meant that food safety systems have struggled to keep up. In 2007 food safety incidents damaged the reputation of aquatic products in export markets. The Chinese Government has moved quickly to strengthen the safety regime for aquatic products. The purpose of this paper is to assess these initiatives in the context of their potential to regain international acceptance of Chinese aquatic products.

Design/methodology/approach

A regulatory assessment approach is used.

Findings

The findings are that increased government oversight alone is not likely to lead to a fully effective food safety system for aquatic products. The development of private sector‐based incentives to encourage investment in food safety is an essential co‐requisite to increased government oversight if China's access to international markets is to be assured.

Originality/value

The value of this study lies in the light it sheds on the efforts of a major player in the international market for aquatic products to improve the efficacy of its food safety system. China's regulatory regimes are often opaque, limiting the ability of those wishing to assess the advisability of importing food products from China.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 114 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2002

Noel Yee‐Man Siu and Hon‐Yan Wong

The study investigates the impact of product‐related factors on perceived product safety. The factors examined include price, brand name, country of origin, store name…

Abstract

The study investigates the impact of product‐related factors on perceived product safety. The factors examined include price, brand name, country of origin, store name, source credibility, product testing, promotion channels, discount offered and packaging. Results indicate that the perceived product safety is significantly affected by all of the mentioned factors. Implications are discussed and recommendations are offered to practitioners for attracting the large and growing market of safety‐conscious consumers.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1996

Howard Johnson

The announcement in the press on May 15 1996 that the daughter of a mother who died of Creutzfeldt Jacobs disease is launching legal action against the UK Government for…

Abstract

The announcement in the press on May 15 1996 that the daughter of a mother who died of Creutzfeldt Jacobs disease is launching legal action against the UK Government for failing in its duty of care to inform the public about the dangers of eating beef is a timely reminder of the horrendous commercial and legal consequences which can follow if an unsafe product gets onto the consumer market. The ‘mad cow’ disease crisis in the UK and the alleged link between BSE in cows and CJD in humans is likely to have a devastating impact on the medium and long term future of the British beef industry and raises serious issues about the failure to take appropriate steps at the right time to prevent such a crisis occurring. The purpose of this article is to examine the legal regime for preventing unsafe products reaching the marketplace in the first place. It will focus on non‐food products, though many of the provisions discussed also apply to food.

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 38 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1981

James Noon

Products liability is having a substantial impact upon manufacturing industry. Marketing management is not immune and it is likely that products liability will lead to a…

Abstract

Products liability is having a substantial impact upon manufacturing industry. Marketing management is not immune and it is likely that products liability will lead to a major revision in product strategies.Starting from first principles, the monograph leads the reader through liability developments and liability issues as they pertain to death and personal injury. The major part of the monograph is devoted to central propositions that will assist the general manager and the marketing manager to review their present thinking and to provide new insights into this challenging, complex and strategic problem.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2021

Shalamujiang Maitiniyazi and Maurizio Canavari

Dairy products are an essential part of a healthy diet, and dairy is an emerging food industry in China. Meanwhile, the dairy industry is one of the “disaster zones” with…

Abstract

Purpose

Dairy products are an essential part of a healthy diet, and dairy is an emerging food industry in China. Meanwhile, the dairy industry is one of the “disaster zones” with quality and safety issues occurring more frequently in its supply chain than in others. Based on qualitative research focused on consumers in the Northwest and South of China, the present study aims to understand and provide information on consumer perception of food safety in dairy products.

Design/methodology/approach

Nine focus group interviews were carried out from January to April 2018. Altogether, 61 participants (24 males, 37 females, aged 18–60 years) were recruited in four cities. Qualitative content analysis of the data was conducted using Nvivo version 11.4.0.

Findings

A high concern with the safety of dairy products is widespread, particularly among participants with children, who are especially worried about the safety of dairy products. High prevalence of food safety incidents causes consumers to lower their confidence in food safety, and make them pay more attention to the news about food safety incidents. Consumers tend to become less sensitive to price, focusing more on food safety and quality, while purchasing dairy products. Brand and purchase venue are the most important indicators for consumers to determine the quality of dairy products. Safety certification becomes increasingly important.

Research limitations/implications

It has some limitations. The focus group interviews covered different two regions (Northwest and South of China). However, the number of focus groups was limited to nine because of budget constraints. The participants come from Northwest and South of the country, which means that the findings may not apply for another area of the country. A more representative sampling with a larger sample size would be necessary to increase the validity of the study. However, the results can serve as input for further research.

Originality/value

This paper explores the Chinese consumers' perception of food safety and dairy products, consumers' behaviour concerning dairy products based on focus group interviews with consumers. This study offers valuable insights to members of academia, food suppliers and policy-makers.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2020

Miranda Mirosa, Yang Liu and Phil Bremer

Food safety is an issue of key concern for Chinese consumers. This study identifies intrinsic and extrinsic cues on product labels or websites that Chinese consumers use…

Abstract

Purpose

Food safety is an issue of key concern for Chinese consumers. This study identifies intrinsic and extrinsic cues on product labels or websites that Chinese consumers use to assess a product's perceived safety.

Design/methodology/approach

Five structured focus groups (total participants n = 41) were run in Suzhou China, in Chinese, to gather consumers' perceptions towards food safety cues.

Findings

A total of 18 safety cues were identified during the focus group discussions. Certifications, country of origin, production date and shelf life, ingredients and materials and nutritional information were the five safety cues consumers perceived to be the most important. The risks perceived by consumers differed based on: product category (e.g. meat, dairy, cereal); product form (e.g. fresh, chilled, frozen) and degree of processing. Interestingly, consumers used different food safety cues to assess a packaged product compared to the product shown on a website.

Research limitations/implications

While providing deep qualitative insights into perceptions of food safety cues, further studies which seek to conduct quantitative work within a wider demographic context are encouraged.

Practical implications

This information will help to provide best practice advice for international marketers and government risk communicators on how and where to communicate the safety of food products so that they can maximise the effectiveness of their messaging within the appropriate information channels and thereby ensure that it resonates well with Chinese consumers.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the academic knowledge of consumer perceptions of cues related to food safety.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 123 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 25 February 2021

Jiehong Zhou, Yu Jin, Yu Wang and Qiao Liang

Food markets are characterized by asymmetric information between suppliers and consumers, which causes inefficiency of market and food safety risks. This paper studies how…

Abstract

Purpose

Food markets are characterized by asymmetric information between suppliers and consumers, which causes inefficiency of market and food safety risks. This paper studies how the food quality and safety information disclosed by the government affects the hazard analysis and critical control point (HACCP) certification decision of meat producers. The heterogeneity of the effects across different regions, provinces with different meat output scales and provinces with different intensities of food safety regulation is evaluated.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper applies a unique database comprising information from multiple sources. Food quality and safety information disclosure is indicated by the number of failure records of food sampling inspections by the government in 2015–2018. Fixed-effect model is used in the analyses.

Findings

The results demonstrate that food quality and safety information disclosure has a significant effect on the HACCP certification adoption by meat producers. The effect is heterogeneous across geographic regions, i.e. this effect is larger in the east and the middle of China than that in the west and the northeast. The heterogeneity across regions may be caused by the variance in meat output scales and fiscal expenditures on food safety among provinces.

Originality/value

This research is one of the preliminary attempts to understand how producers respond in terms of HACCP certification to the amount of food quality and safety information disclosed by the government, based on the case of meat industry in China.

Details

China Agricultural Economic Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-137X

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Article
Publication date: 17 August 2015

William J. Ritchie, George Young, Ali M. Shahzad, Robert W. Kolodinsky and Steven A. Melnyk

The purpose of this paper is to explore product adoption beliefs and actions of a large retail food organization with both corporate-owned stores and privately held…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore product adoption beliefs and actions of a large retail food organization with both corporate-owned stores and privately held franchise stores.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors used a case study approach involving survey data collection from 190 corporate-owned and licensed retail outlets that were members of a large, single organization. Ordinary least squares regression and mean differences (t-tests) were used to test the data. Findings were elaborated upon based upon structured interviews.

Findings

Corporate-owned retail outlets invested heavily in food safety innovation, while franchised retail outlets pursued minimal investment to retain product flexibility. The level of adoption is contingent upon ownership structure, as well as institutional forces emanating from the corporate environment, the customer, and peer organizations.

Research limitations/implications

The findings offer greater insight into methodological issues associated with measurement of new product adoption in particular. The authors have shown that it is critical for researchers to clarify the level of analysis of the study. Quantitative survey analysis revealed both safety and economic motivations to be desirable issues in product adoption considerations. However, when quantitative and qualitative results were combined, very different outcomes were realized as ownership structure differences appear to dominate product adoption decisions. Therefore, when conducting plural organizational form research, the data gathering efforts must be carefully undertaken to ensure that critical drivers of phenomena explored are not overlooked.

Practical implications

Adoption of new product adoption involves the complex interplay between ownership structure/control, economic cost/benefit, managerial choice, and societal norms. Often, organizational research relating to adoption of new processes and innovations collects individual-level data. However, this study shows that adoption decisions occur at multiple levels and that the ownership/structural context must be considered.

Social implications

The study has implications from social innovation/responsibility perspectives. Recent press regarding food safety has put pressure on food processing establishments to consider methods of reducing food safety breaches. No doubt, this has alerted the consumer to potential risks in food processing and influenced their preferences in favor of food safety innovations. Nonetheless, perceptions of the importance of “safety” can be interpreted in a variety of ways, leading to differing courses of action. Interviews with corporate-level executives revealed that they preferred both corporate-owned and franchised retail outlets adopt case ready (CR) meats to stem safety concerns. Yet, this aspiration diffused throughout the organization differently.

Originality/value

Multiple organizational structure forms operating within the same organizational entity, or “plural form” organizations, offer unique opportunities for examination. Applying various theoretical lenses, including agency theory, the resource-based theory, and institutional theory, the authors offer rationale for why different structural types within the same corporate entity may differ in their beliefs and actions concerning product safety, cost, and adoption.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 53 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 12 August 2014

Lydia Martens

This paper aims to examine, through a focus on the practice of child caring, how three qualities of childhood preciousness, vulnerability and unpredictability, are…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine, through a focus on the practice of child caring, how three qualities of childhood preciousness, vulnerability and unpredictability, are nurtured by being brought together as rationales for product re-design, innovation and diversification. The new parent of today is confronted with a myriad of products that are designed to “safeguard”, “guide” and “monitor” the young child and ensure its well-being.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on research into the organisation of encounter platforms that serve as communication forums for commercial practitioners and child carers, and includes insights derived from fieldwork and a cultural content analysis of the British retailer Mothercare, consumer exhibitions and brand–product websites.

Findings

After providing a brief outline of the research on which this paper draws, the author present three ways in which child safety is present in the market that caters for young children and their care. This is followed by a discussion of two case studies, which respectively expand on how vulnerability and unpredictability are nurtured in commercial narratives.

Originality/value

The author concludes by drawing out the implications of the risk-averse culture, which this creates.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

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