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1 – 10 of over 5000
Article
Publication date: 12 May 2020

Virgo Süsi and Oliver Lukason

The purpose of this paper is to explore the linkages between the appointment of a new management board member and the following strategic change (SC) in the product-market

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the linkages between the appointment of a new management board member and the following strategic change (SC) in the product-market scope of the firm.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based on the whole population of Estonian firms, in total 16,941 observations and the data are retrieved from Estonian Business Register. First, the authors focus on the association between the appointment of a new board member and the likelihood of different types of SC. Second, the authors focus on the association between the new board member’s previous export experience and export-related SC. Logistic regressions are applied for all models.

Findings

The results indicate that there is a significant association between the appointment of a new board member and the subsequent start of exports and also continuing it, entrance into a new industry and making an SC in more broad terms, though the significance levels vary across the composed models. No significant relationship was found with the entrance into the additional geographic market(s) for already exporting firms. There was also a significant association between the previous export experience of a new board member and the subsequent start of exporting.

Originality/value

The authors look at SC in the product-market domain holistically by applying the same data on both geographic and product portfolio expansion options. The authors also introduce the scale and stability contexts of SCs. These aspects are usually neglected from similar studies.

Details

Review of International Business and Strategy, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-6014

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1990

Benjamin B. Tregoe, John W. Zimmerman, Ronald A. Smith and Peter M. Tobia

Question: From the strategic perspective, what keeps your decision making for all future product, market, or business development on target? Answer: the driving force…

Abstract

Question: From the strategic perspective, what keeps your decision making for all future product, market, or business development on target? Answer: the driving force. This is a description of the classic analytical model in use.

Details

Planning Review, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0094-064X

Article
Publication date: 1 August 1997

Mehmet Oktemgil and Gordon Greenley

In the literature it is proposed that high adaptive capability is associated with high costs and internal inefficiency, despite the potential benefits to be gained from…

2176

Abstract

In the literature it is proposed that high adaptive capability is associated with high costs and internal inefficiency, despite the potential benefits to be gained from being adaptive. Investigates a set of adaptability variables that have not been previously researched and, therefore, takes an alternative focus on adaptive capability. Identifies two distinct degrees of high and low adaptive capability in an empirical UK study. Suggests that companies with high adaptive capability seemingly perform better than low adapters, despite the implication of high costs and inefficiency. High adapters also seem to have more comprehensive market orientation and decision‐making style, although they appear to operate in more turbulent external environments. The results extend the current adaptive capability literature, and directions for further research are proposed.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 31 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 January 2009

Anders Pehrsson

The purpose of this paper is to review previous research and to propose a model for the impact of barriers to entry on the market strategy of an entrant firm, where…

11948

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review previous research and to propose a model for the impact of barriers to entry on the market strategy of an entrant firm, where product/market scope and product differentiation are central strategy components. The paper asks, what is the impact of barriers on market strategies of entrants? Are early and late entrants affected in different ways?

Design/methodology/approach

A model and propositions are developed‐based on a review of previous research. The model applies the contingency perspective and company cases exemplify the model.

Findings

It is proposed that a firm that enters a market late and faces extensive barriers would choose a broader product/market scope and differentiate its products to a larger extent than an early entrant. It is also proposed that incumbents' market strategies indirectly affect the market strategy of an entrant firm as incumbents' market strategies interact with barriers, and the effects are due to entry timing.

Research limitations/implications

The study contributes theoretically as it extends current knowledge of the impact of barriers to entry on strategy. Management of entrant firms are advised to strive for a fit between barriers and market strategy and consider the propositions.

Originality/value

The model and the propositions concern barrier effects on two key components of the market strategy of an entrant firm: product/market scope and product differentiation. Another important value is that the model accounts for interactions between incumbent strategies and barriers to entry, and effects on the market strategy of an entrant firm.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 November 2003

Robert E. Morgan, Carolyn A. Strong and Tony McGuinness

Adopts a firm‐level approach and attempts to develop our understanding of the means through which different types of firm compete. Addresses specifically, a lacuna in…

17332

Abstract

Adopts a firm‐level approach and attempts to develop our understanding of the means through which different types of firm compete. Addresses specifically, a lacuna in existing knowledge by investigating a fundamental research question: “How do firms pursuing a prospector mode of market strategy differ from those pursuing a defender, analyzer or reactor strategy in terms of the product‐market positioning attributes they exhibit?“ Miles and Snow provide the basis for the assessment of strategy types, while “strategic market positioning” is characterised as the product‐market positions established by the firm. Conceptualises strategic market positioning as the ways in which firm‐specific resources and assets are deployed to build positional advantages in product‐markets. Presents analyses of data generated from high technology, medium and large, industrial manufacturing firms and discusses these results in the light of previous findings. Places particular emphasis on the distinguishing characteristics of prospector‐type firms. Identifies a number of potential research avenues from this study and discusses several implications for executives.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 37 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 August 2011

Anders Pehrsson

The purpose of this paper is to explore the competition antecedents and performance effects of firm product/customer scope, and the moderating role of market growth.

1319

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the competition antecedents and performance effects of firm product/customer scope, and the moderating role of market growth.

Design/methodology/approach

The theoretical model follows the contingency perspective on strategy and draws on the strategy and competitive dynamics literature. A questionnaire was used to gather the quantitative data for testing the hypotheses using regression analyses. The questionnaires were completed by executives of 432 Swedish industrial firms serving business customers. The firms offering clean technology products operate in growing markets while the firms offering miscellaneous products operate in mature markets.

Findings

Competition is an antecedent of firm product/customer scope. The more competitive the action of the main competitor, the more limited the customer scope of the firm if it operates in a mature market. The impact of the main competitor's scope is robust across all market contexts. Furthermore, the broader the product scope of the firm, the better the financial performance if the firm operates in a growing market.

Research limitations/implications

The study contributes theoretically, as it extends our knowledge of crucial relationships of firm product/market scope. A firm must be aware of its main competitor's scope and action, and adapt its scope to the level of market growth.

Originality/value

The theoretical model and the tests go beyond those used in previous research. Another key value is the analysis of perceptual data gathered from executives. Earlier studies of competition assume equal perceptions among competing firms and do not acknowledge that market contexts are ambiguous realities.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 23 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 November 2017

Yoojin Oh and Jongkuk Lee

The purpose of this paper is to understand the mechanisms of partner selection from the transaction cost economics’ viewpoint. This paper reveals that a firm’s choice to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand the mechanisms of partner selection from the transaction cost economics’ viewpoint. This paper reveals that a firm’s choice to initiate a new alliance with a new partner or form a repeated alliance with an existing partner depends on contract terms and the relative characteristics of partners.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors examine 555 alliances in high-tech industries from 2001 to 2009, which the authors collected from secondary sources, including the Securities Data Company Platinum and Compustat databases. The authors use a logit model to reveal the effect of contract terms and relative partner characteristics on repeated partnership.

Findings

The results show that repeated partnership is less likely to be combined with equity sharing. Repeated partnership is also negatively associated with the functional scope of a new alliance. Finally, a firm is more likely to enter a repeated partnership when its partner is from a different country.

Originality/value

This research provides new insights into how the choice of an alliance partner depends on contract terms and the relative characteristics of partners. Identifying factors associated with partner selection helps us understand the fundamental mechanisms of initiating a new alliance. It allows focal firms to foresee the behavior of their peers or competitors in certain circumstances and thus provides important insights for developing corresponding strategies more effectively.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 55 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 July 2017

Wenbin Sun and Rahul Govind

Extant literature indicates that increased product market diversification generates both positive and negative impact on firm performance. This inconclusive pattern…

4756

Abstract

Purpose

Extant literature indicates that increased product market diversification generates both positive and negative impact on firm performance. This inconclusive pattern hinders the decision-making of deploying a firm’s resources across different markets. This research aims to embed diversification into a moderation-based framework and demonstrates the conditions under which increased diversification produces either beneficial or harmful effects on firm outcomes. The authors introduce another market configuration dimension, viz., market emphasis, and reveal how changes in diversification and in emphasis yield interactive effects on an important firm performance indicator, idiosyncratic risk. An additional moderator, market turbulence, is also incorporated to further enrich the model in a three-way interaction. Results show that when market turbulence is high, and a firm highly skews its resources to some of its markets, diversifying into more market domains will increase firm idiosyncratic risk. A better choice during increased diversification is to evenly emphasize each of its markets. However, in a market displaying low turbulence, the high diversification-high emphasis pattern may be preferred because of lower firm risk.

Design/methodology/approach

To test the hypotheses, the authors collected a comprehensive archival data that contained a large group of public traded US-based manufacturing companies from three different resources. These were the Compustat Annual Database, the Center for Research in Security Prices database and Compustat Business Segment Database. These databases and the combinatorial approach are widely adopted in marketing and management research involving firm strategies and financial outcomes.

Findings

When market turbulence is high, simultaneously increasing market diversification and emphasis will more strongly raise firm idiosyncratic risk. However, polarizing into either diversification or emphasis reduces firm risk. When in a low turbulence market, expanding to more product markets and simultaneously emphasizing key markets will decrease idiosyncratic risk. One noticeable fact is that irrespective of whether a firm is in high or low turbulence conditions, choosing a diversification strategy always decreases firm risk when market emphasis is low. However, the impact of this effect however is higher when turbulence is greater. The authors also present the boundary conditions under which the three-way interaction holds.

Research limitations/implications

First, the extension to the utilization of idiosyncratic risk stretches the understanding of effective ways of reducing firm risks from an angle of marketing management. This view of firm risk also contributes to further analysis of shareholder value. Classic corporate asset valuation focuses more on the financial performance indicators as well as the firm’s strategic domains. This research thus provides a unique and meaningful guideline for the corporate valuation approach from the angle of analyzing the firm’s business segment scope and emphasis in the context of the environment.

Practical implications

The idea about how many product markets a firm should enter is always one of the primary decisions that contain significant trade-offs. This makes the managers choice difficult during the decision-making processes. The authors suggest that managers should not only consider the scope of product markets but also think carefully about the resources allocated toward each segment. A matrix with dimensions of diversification and emphasis can be explicitly studied during the strategy formulation. The individual blocks within this matrix may have significant outcome differences.

Originality/value

Previous research focuses on either a firm’s internal assets or external competitive situations when researchers seek the drivers of risk-reduction. This research extends this horizon by adding the interplay between a set of fundamental firm decision areas, diversification and emphasis and the external conditions facing a firm (turbulence).

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 51 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 November 2018

Varaporn Pangboonyanon and Kiattichai Kalasin

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how within-industry diversification affects the financial performance of small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in emerging…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how within-industry diversification affects the financial performance of small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in emerging markets (EMs). The authors draw on both the resource-based view and the institutional perspective and argue that within-industry diversification can enhance the financial performance of SMEs in EMs. Due to institutional voids in emerging economies, SMEs can gain additional benefits from scope economies, as well as from market returns, by filling product market voids and gaps in business ecosystems, while also enjoying low input and labor costs that reduce the coordination costs of diversification. This, in turn, enhances benefits of within-industry diversification, thereby resulting in higher financial profitability.

Design/methodology/approach

This study employs panel data econometrics to estimate the model. The authors test hypotheses on 195 firms, originating from five countries in Southeast Asia, during the period of 2009–2014.

Findings

The empirical results support the arguments. Within-industry diversification has a positive impact on the performance of SMEs in EMs. These effects become weaker when the institutional contexts are more developed. Nevertheless, such effects become stronger when SMEs in EMs are more efficient.

Research limitations/implications

The relationship between within-industry diversification and performance is a positive linear pattern, which differs from the pattern in advanced economies. In addition to unrelated diversification, the related diversification is preferable for firms in EMs.

Practical implications

The paper provides implications for SMEs that aim to enhance their performance by engaging in single product lines and within-industry diversification.

Originality/value

This paper examines the different ways within-industry diversification can enhance SMEs performance in EM contexts.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. 13 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 November 2018

Varaporn Pangboonyanon and Kiattichai Kalasin

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how within-industry diversification affects the financial performance of small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in emerging…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how within-industry diversification affects the financial performance of small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in emerging markets (EMs). The authors draw on both the resource-based view and the institutional perspective and argue that within-industry diversification can enhance the financial performance of SMEs in EMs. Due to institutional voids in emerging economies, SMEs can gain additional benefits from scope economies, as well as from market returns, by filling product market voids and gaps in business ecosystems, while also enjoying low input and labor costs that reduce the coordination costs of diversification. This, in turn, enhances benefits of within-industry diversification, thereby resulting in higher financial profitability.

Design/methodology/approach

This study employs panel data econometrics to estimate the model. The authors test hypotheses on 195 firms, originating from five countries in Southeast Asia, during the period of 2009–2014.

Findings

The empirical results support the arguments. Within-industry diversification has a positive impact on the performance of SMEs in EMs. These effects become weaker when the institutional contexts are more developed. Nevertheless, such effects become stronger when SMEs in EMs are more efficient.

Research limitations/implications

The relationship between within-industry diversification and performance is a positive linear pattern, which differs from the pattern in advanced economies. In addition to unrelated diversification, the related diversification is preferable for firms in EMs.

Practical implications

The paper provides implications for SMEs that aim to enhance their performance by engaging in single product lines and within-industry diversification.

Originality/value

This paper examines the different ways within-industry diversification can enhance SMEs performance in EM contexts.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. 13 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 5000