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Article
Publication date: 13 July 2021

Bahadur Ali Soomro and Naimatullah Shah

In the present era, entrepreneurs’ well-being is considered a significant factor owing to its strong relationship with entrepreneurship. Therefore, this study aims to…

Abstract

Purpose

In the present era, entrepreneurs’ well-being is considered a significant factor owing to its strong relationship with entrepreneurship. Therefore, this study aims to investigate the relationship between fear of failure and entrepreneurs’ well-being through the mediating effect of procrastination.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is descriptive, with cross-sectional data obtained through a survey questionnaire distributed randomly in Pakistan. Overall, data from 346 valid cases were used to achieve suitable study outcomes.

Findings

This study’s empirical findings highlight the negative effect of fear of failure on subjective well-being. Fear of failure is found to have a significant positive effect on procrastination. Furthermore, procrastination has a negative effect on subjective well-being. Finally, procrastination has a negative role in mediating the relationship between fear of failure and subjective well-being.

Practical implications

The conceptualization of the fear of failure and procrastination (direct and indirect) in relation to subjective well-being may offer a novel contribution in terms of a framework, policymaking and practice. Policymakers, top management and the government may consider the hindering effects of procrastination and fear of failure on entrepreneurs’ well-being and ventures’ success. The study findings may also enrich views in the literature on entrepreneurship and management, particularly in the developing country context.

Originality/value

This study could be helpful in eradicating the traps of procrastination and fear of failure, raising entrepreneurs’ confidence and levels of activity.

Details

Journal of Entrepreneurship in Emerging Economies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-4604

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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2020

Shabnam Azimi, George R. Milne and Elizabeth G. Miller

This paper aims to examine the factors leading to and resulting from procrastination under high price uncertainty and provide recommendations for how managers can reduce…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the factors leading to and resulting from procrastination under high price uncertainty and provide recommendations for how managers can reduce consumer procrastination, thus decreasing consumer regret, anger and retaliatory behaviors.

Design/methodology/approach

Hypothesized relationships were tested through two scenario-based experiments using student samples. Data was analyzed using general linear model, path analysis and Wald chi-square test.

Findings

Long time limits, price uncertainty and price consciousness, all increase the likelihood of procrastination. Prestige seeking reduces procrastination, but only when time limits are short. When one delays a purchase and later the price of the item gets increased or one makes a purchase and later the price gets further reduced, procrastination and purchase decision both equally can lead to anger, which then increases the probability of exit, voice or word of mouth (WOM); however, procrastination has a much stronger impact than deciding to purchase on self-responsibility and regret, which in turn increases negative WOM.

Research limitations/implications

This paper provides a greater understanding of antecedents and consequences of procrastination as well as the drivers of retaliatory behavior. Further, the findings highlight differential consequences of consumer regret and anger on consumption behaviors.

Practical implications

This paper provides practical suggestions for reducing consumers’ procrastination through leveraging the effects of purchase time limit and price uncertainty in general, and more specifically, for prestige-seeker and price conscious consumers. The findings provide evidence for a silent path from procrastination to retaliation and highlight the importance of possible remedies or interventions by the companies to mitigate consumer emotions resulting from procrastination.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this research is the first to apply temporal motivation theory in the context of consumer behavior under price uncertainty, and examine consequences of consumer procrastination in terms of thoughts, feelings and retaliatory behavior.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 37 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 10 January 2020

Angelina Parfenova and Sofya Romashova

This research paper is devoted to the academic procrastination, and the purpose of this paper is to reveal the role of academic procrastination in the consumer behavior of…

Abstract

Purpose

This research paper is devoted to the academic procrastination, and the purpose of this paper is to reveal the role of academic procrastination in the consumer behavior of students.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was conducted within the framework of a mixed methodology: series of semi-structured interviews and an online survey. In the first stage, 20 interviews were conducted with students from different countries to obtain the broader picture for the academic procrastination process and its association with consumer behavior. In the second stage, an online survey was conducted, in which 336 students from different countries participated. This paper describes existing approaches to understanding and measuring academic procrastination, as well as its role in the economic behavior of individuals.

Findings

As a result of the qualitative stage, the role of procrastination in such aspects of consumer behavior as budget planning and inclination to making unplanned purchases was emphasized. The role of the student’s inner circle in his procrastination and consumer behavior was also highlighted. As a result of the quantitative stage, a significant connection between the level of academic procrastination and the above aspects of consumer behavior of students, as well as a significant contribution of social expectations in the change of procrastination level and impulsivity of consumption was revealed.

Originality/value

This study is the first attempt to describe procrastination within the macro-approach of sociology and to confirm at the empirical level the correlation between procrastination and consumer behavior.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 40 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Article
Publication date: 16 June 2020

Robert Paul Jones

This study explores procrastination, a negative work behaviour, and its unlikely source, job passion. A dualistic conceptualization of job passion is explored in retail…

Abstract

Purpose

This study explores procrastination, a negative work behaviour, and its unlikely source, job passion. A dualistic conceptualization of job passion is explored in retail sales associate samples from the United States and China. The study tests relationships between harmonious job passion (HJP) and obsessive job passion (OJP) and the contingent effects of job satisfaction and salary level on their relationship to procrastination.

Design/methodology/approach

Data came from an online survey issued in the United States and China. The hypotheses were tested using hierarchical linear regression.

Findings

The analyses provide mixed findings. HJP is negatively associated with procrastination in both countries, while OJP's positive relationship is mixed. A post-hoc analysis testing the three-way interaction effect of OJP, job satisfaction and salary level on procrastination reveals a positive relationship to OJP in both countries.

Research limitations/implications

The study demonstrates that job passion can have both positive (HJP) and negative (OJP) work behaviour outcomes.

Practical implications

Brick-and-mortar retailers facing a saturated and highly competitive environment need HJP employees to drive superior customer service. This study demonstrates that employees with OJP may engage in negative behaviours which could further impair retail performance. Expanding empowerment and flexibility may heighten HJP and minimize OJP.

Originality/value

This study explores the dualistic conceptualization of job passion in a retail environment using cross-cultural samples.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 48 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 30 April 2020

Rahul Singh Chauhan, Alexandra E. MacDougall, Michael Ronald Buckley, David Charles Howe, Marisa E. Crisostomo and Thomas Zeni

Procrastination is regularly presented as a behavior to avoid, but this paper argues that individuals who strategically engage in procrastination may experience unique…

Abstract

Purpose

Procrastination is regularly presented as a behavior to avoid, but this paper argues that individuals who strategically engage in procrastination may experience unique performance benefits that non-procrastinators do not. The purpose of this paper is to present a balanced framework from which procrastination, beginning with a review of the procrastination performance literature and historical stance on the behavior, can be understood.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents and reviews the use of procrastination in organizations.

Findings

Our findings indicate that while procrastination can be dysfunctional, it can prove to be strategically valuable. To summarize, this paper recommends a holistic conceptualization of procrastination that refrains from value judgment and calls for rethinking the stigma associated with the behavior.

Originality/value

This paper highlights both the theoretical and practical importance of exploring the benefits of procrastination in an organizational context.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 43 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2012

Anissa Negra and Mohamed Nabil Mzoughi

Online purchases might be delayed. In some cases, this postponement could be a privileged, an adequate, or an efficient strategy. Online consumer procrastination is the…

Abstract

Purpose

Online purchases might be delayed. In some cases, this postponement could be a privileged, an adequate, or an efficient strategy. Online consumer procrastination is the voluntary and rational delay of a planned online purchase. The purpose of this research is to develop a measure of this behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

The Churchill's paradigm adapted by Roehrich was adopted. A total of 77 items were generated from 27 interviews. This set of items was reduced to 23 after dropping out redundant or not representative items. In a pilot study, factor analysis on the 23‐item scale yielded a two‐factor structure scale of five items with a reliability ranging from 0.715 to 0.809. The Online Consumer Procrastination Scale (OCPS) was statistically confirmed and validated, in a subsequent investigation.

Findings

Findings revealed a reliable and valid five‐item scale. Its dimensions are online deal‐proneness and online rationality.

Research limitations/implications

This research allows a better conceptualization of the online consumer procrastination. Future research should assess the OCPS validity across different product categories.

Practical implications

OCPS will make easier the recognition of e‐shoppers who delay the achievement of online purchase intentions.

Originality/value

OCPS is the first scale measuring the reasonable delay in an online purchase context.

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Article
Publication date: 7 November 2017

Rachana Ghosh and Santanu Roy

This study aims to examine the impact of multidimensional perfectionism on academic procrastination among university students in India and to explore whether gender plays…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the impact of multidimensional perfectionism on academic procrastination among university students in India and to explore whether gender plays any role in this relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from a sample of 90 female and 60 male students, aged 18-23 years, enrolled in full-time bachelor’s and master’s programs in a central university in the National Capital Region of India and analyzed adopting different statistical techniques.

Findings

The findings indicated that academic procrastination positively correlates with all the three dimensions of perfectionism – self-oriented perfectionism, other-oriented perfectionism and socially prescribed perfectionism. The different dimensions of perfectionism also significantly predict academic procrastination. Gender differences exist with regard to other-oriented perfectionism, socially prescribed perfectionism and academic procrastination.

Research limitations/implications

The results highlight that the different dimensions of perfectionism play a critical role in shaping academic procrastination among university students, but this trajectory often differs between male and female students. Further research among a larger student audience would help concretize the study conclusions.

Originality/value

This study extends the extant literature by examining the predictive relationships between the different dimensions of perfectionism and academic procrastination and the gender differences that exist with regard to academic procrastination and the different dimensions of perfectionism among university students, especially within the context of a developing country (i.e., India).

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 32 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

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Book part
Publication date: 18 December 2016

Sebastian J. Goerg, Sebastian Kube, Jonas Radbruch and Philipp Weinschenk

We experimentally study strategic procrastination in a dynamic team environment. Two team members work for a finite number of periods on a joint project. The project’s…

Abstract

We experimentally study strategic procrastination in a dynamic team environment. Two team members work for a finite number of periods on a joint project. The project’s success probability depends on the effort provided by both group members. Payment is conditional on finishing the project successfully. Between treatments, we vary whether both agents are free to choose their effort level or only a single agent can do so. If only one agent can choose effort, the effort of the other member is exogenously fixed; either to providing effort only shortly before the deadline or to providing effort in all periods. While in the former case we observe some effort patterns that resemble rational procrastination, the results from the other two treatments suggest that this seems to be caused by other-regarding concerns rather than being due to the strategic motives inherent in the mechanics of rational procrastination models.

Details

Experiments in Organizational Economics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-964-0

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2018

Majid Al-Amri

Research has demonstrated that high percentages of undergraduate college students self-report they engage in academic procrastination which has significant adverse effects…

Abstract

Research has demonstrated that high percentages of undergraduate college students self-report they engage in academic procrastination which has significant adverse effects on academic progress with relative consistency. The present study was designed to help English as a foreign language (EFL) procrastinators study on a regular basis, and also to extend the learning of the high achievers. To do so, seventy English as a Foreign Language students in the study were classified by level of procrastination based on scores on the Procrastination Scale (Tuckman, 1991). Half of the students experienced the student-led seminars condition; the other half experienced the assignments condition. Although the student-led seminars condition produced significantly higher scores overall on a final achievement examination than the outline condition did, a significant interaction between condition and student procrastination level reflected an almost 14% advantage for the student-led seminars condition among high procrastinators. There was almost no difference between student-led seminars and assignments conditions for medium and low procrastinators. In addition, the qualitative data revealed high levels of satisfaction among students in the experimental group regarding the seminars and the instructor, as well as the perceived amount of new information learned.

ﻟﻘد أﺛﺑﺗ ت اﻟ د ر ا ﺳ ﺎ ت اﻟ ﺳ ﺎﺑﻘﺔ ا ر ﺗﻔﺎ ع ﻧ ﺳ ﺑ ﺔ اﻟﺗ ﺳ وﯾ ف ا ﻷ ﻛﺎ دﯾ ﻣ ﻲ ﻟ د ى ط ﻼ ب اﻟ ﺟ ﺎ ﻣﻌﺎ ت و ﺗﺄﺛﯾ ر ه اﻟ ﺳ ﻠﺑ ﻲ ﻋ ﻠ ﻰ ﺗﺣﺻ ﯾﻠ ﮭم ا ﻷﻛﺎدﯾ ﻣ ﻲ. ﻟذ ﻟ ك ﺗم ﺗﺻﻣﯾم ھذه اﻟدرا ﺳﺔ ﻟﻐر ض ﻣﺳﺎ ﻋدة اﻟﻣﺳوﻓﯾ ن أﻛﺎ د ﯾ ﻣ ﯾ ﺎً ﻣ ن ط ﻼ ب ا ﻟ ﻠ ﻐ ﺔ ا ﻹ ﻧ ﺟ ﻠ ﯾ ز ﯾ ﺔ ﻛ ﻠ ﻐ ﺔ أ ﺟ ﻧ ﺑ ﯾ ﺔ وﻛ ذﻟ ك ﻟﺗﻌزﯾ ز ﻣ ﺳﺗ و ى اﻟ طﻼب ذو ي اﻟ ﺗ ﺣﺻ ﯾل ا ﻷﻛﺎدﯾﻣﻲ اﻟﻣرﺗﻔﻊ. وا ﺷﺗﻣﻠ ت ﻋ ﯾ ﻧ ﺔ ا ﻟ ﺑ ﺣ ث ﻋ ﻠ ﻰ ﺳ ﺑ ﻌ ﯾ ن ط ﺎ ﻟ ﺑ ﺎً ﻣ ن ط ﻼ ب ا ﻟ ﻠ ﻐ ﺔ ا ﻹ ﻧ ﺟ ﻠ ﯾ ز ﯾ ﺔ ﻛ ﻠ ﻐ ﺔ أ ﺟ ﻧ ﺑ ﯾ ﺔ ﻓ ﻲ ا ﻟ ﻣ ر ﺣ ﻠ ﺔ ا ﻟ ﺟ ﺎ ﻣ ﻌ ﯾ ﺔ . وﺗ م ﺗﻘ ﺳﯾم اﻟ طﻼب ﺑﻧ ﺎ ء ﻋ ﻠ ﻰ ﻣﻘ ﯾﺎ س اﻟﺗ ﺳوﯾ ف ) Tuckman, 1991 ( اﻟ ﻰ ﺛﻼث ﻣ ﺳﺗ وﯾﺎ ت: ﻋﺎﻟ ﻲ، ﻣﺗ وﺳط، وﻣﻧ ﺧﻔ ض ، وﺗم ا ﺳﺗ ﺧدام اﻟﺣ ﻠﻘﺎ ت اﻟد ر ا ﺳ ﯾ ﺔ اﻟ ﺗ ﻲ ﯾﻘ و دھ ﺎ اﻟط ﺎﻟ ب ﻣﻊ إ ﺣ د ى اﻟ ﺷ ﻌ ب اﻟ د ر ا ﺳ ﯾ ﺔ ) 30 طﺎ ﻟ ب(، وﺗم أ ﺳﺗ ﺧدام اﻟ وا ﺟﺑﺎ ت اﻟد را ﺳﯾﺔ ﻣﻊ طﻼب اﻟ ﺷﻌﺑﺔ اﻷﺧر ى. أظﮭر ت اﻟد را ﺳﺔ ﻓﺎﻋ ﻠﯾ ﺔ اﻟ ﺣ ﻠﻘﺎت اﻟ د ر ا ﺳ ﯾ ﺔ اﻟﺗ ﻲ ﯾﻘ ودھﺎ اﻟ ط ﺎﻟ ب ﻋ ﻠ ﻰ ا ﻷ دا ء ا ﻷ ﻛﺎ دﯾ ﻣ ﻲ ﻟ د ى اﻟ ط ﻼب ﻓ ﻲ اﻟﻣﺟﻣوﻋﺔ اﻟ ﺗ ﺟ ر ﯾﺑﯾ ﺔ و ﺧ ﺻ و ﺻ ﺎً ﻟ د ى ا ﻟ ط ﻼ ب ذ و ا ﻟ ﻣ ﺳ ﺗ و ى ا ﻟ ﻌ ﺎ ﻟ ﻲ ﻣ ن ا ﻟ ﺗ ﺳ و ﯾ ف ا ﻷ ﻛ ﺎ د ﯾ ﻣ ﻲ ) 14 %( . ﻛذﻟ ك أ ظﮭر ت اﻟدرا ﺳﺔ ر ﺿﺎ اﻟ طﻼب ﻋن اﻟ ﺣﻠﻘﺎ ت اﻟد ر ا ﺳ ﯾ ﺔ و أ ﺳ ﺗﺎ ذ اﻟﻣﻘ ر ر و ﻛذﻟ ك ﻛﻣﯾ ﺔ اﻟﻣﻌر ﻓﺔ اﻟﺟ دﯾدة اﻟ ﺗ ﻲ ﺗم ا ﻛﺗ ﺳ ﺎﺑ ﮭﺎ.

Details

Learning and Teaching in Higher Education: Gulf Perspectives, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2077-5504

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Article
Publication date: 9 October 2017

Adam Kanar

The purpose of this paper is to enhance the understanding of self-regulation during job search by integrating goal-orientation theory with a resource allocation framework.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to enhance the understanding of self-regulation during job search by integrating goal-orientation theory with a resource allocation framework.

Design/methodology/approach

The author surveyed job searching new labor market entrants at two time points and hypothesized that the effects of job seekers’ state goal orientations on indicators of self-regulation during the job search process (procrastination, anxiety, and guidance-seeking behaviors) depended on levels of employment goal commitment (EGC).

Findings

Results indicate that for job seekers with higher levels of EGC, a state learning-approach goal orientation (LGO) was beneficial for the job search process and a state performance-approach goal orientation (PGO) was detrimental. For job seekers with lower levels of EGC, a state LGO was detrimental to the search process, while a state PGO was beneficial.

Research limitations/implications

This research extends the understanding of state goal orientation in the context of job search. Future research may replicate these findings with different samples of employed and unemployed job seekers and extend this research with additional conceptualizations of resource limitations.

Practical implications

The present research suggests that the effectiveness of learning-approach goal-orientation training methods in the context of job search must be considered in light of individual differences in resource availability. In particular, individuals with lower resources available for job searching may benefit from interventions focusing on increasing state PGO.

Originality/value

The present results suggest that EGC is an important moderator of the impact of job search goal orientation on indicators of self-regulation during job search, and therefore present important boundary conditions regarding the role of state goal orientation in the job search process.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 22 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

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