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Article

Steven Gross, Katharina Stelzl, Thomas Grisold, Jan Mendling, Maximilian Röglinger and Jan vom Brocke

Process redesign refers to the intentional change of business processes. While process redesign methods provide structure to redesign projects, they provide limited…

Abstract

Purpose

Process redesign refers to the intentional change of business processes. While process redesign methods provide structure to redesign projects, they provide limited support during the actual creation of to-be processes. More specifically, existing approaches hardly develop an ontological perspective on what can be changed from a process design point of view, and they provide limited procedural guidance on how to derive possible process design alternatives. This paper aims to provide structured guidance during the to-be process creation.

Design/methodology/approach

Using design space exploration as a theoretical lens, the authors develop a conceptual model of the design space for business processes, which facilitates the systematic exploration of design alternatives along different dimensions. The authors utilized an established method for taxonomy development for constructing the conceptual model. First, the authors derived design dimensions for business processes and underlying characteristics through a literature review. Second, the authors conducted semi-structured interviews with professional process experts. Third, the authors evaluated their artifact through three real-world applications.

Findings

The authors identified 19 business process design dimensions that are grouped into different layers and specified by underlying characteristics. Guiding questions and illustrative real-world examples help to deploy these design dimensions in practice. Taken together, the design dimensions form the “Business Process Design Space” (BPD-Space).

Research limitations/implications

Practitioners can use the BPD-Space to explore, question and rethink business processes in various respects.

Originality/value

The BPD-Space complements existing approaches by explicating process design dimensions. It abstracts from specific process flows and representations of processes and supports an unconstrained exploration of various alternative process designs.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

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Article

Azim Danesh and Ned Kock

The purpose of research is to examine the communication optimization theory by comparing two business process representation approaches and related redesign guidelines…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of research is to examine the communication optimization theory by comparing two business process representation approaches and related redesign guidelines through an experiment.

Design/methodology/approach

The experiment examined two process representation approaches involving 114 subjects. Each method gravitated around a different business process representation – one placed emphasis on business process activities and their sequencing, and the other on the web of communication interactions found in business processes.

Findings

The key finding was that an emphasis on a communication‐oriented view of processes seems to increase perceived modeling quality and redesign success.

Research limitations/implications

Data were collected from various information systems classes at a university. The participants were not redesign team members in an actual organizational redesign project. Future studies should focus on the characteristics of the designers.

Practical implications

The findings should allow managers and practitioners involved in operational‐level process redesign to acknowledge and focus on the flow of information rather than just the activities performed or at least determine a balance between these two approaches. Further, the information system developers and designers should be able to better align information systems design with business processes techniques. Using communication flow methodologies in the analysis stage should significantly help the design and the development processes.

Originality/value

This research was one of the first experimental studies to test the communication flow optimization theory and its effect on business process redesign.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 11 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

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Article

Felix Krause, Marc‐Andre Bewernik and Gilbert Fridgen

The continuous redesign of processes is crucial for companies in times of tough competition and fast‐changing surrounding conditions. Since the manual redesign of processes

Abstract

Purpose

The continuous redesign of processes is crucial for companies in times of tough competition and fast‐changing surrounding conditions. Since the manual redesign of processes is a time‐ and resource‐consuming task, automated redesign will increasingly become a useful alternative. Hence, future redesign projects need to be valuated based on both a manual and an automated redesign approach. The purpose of this paper is to compare the manual and automated process redesign on the basis of the Business Process Management (BPM) lifecycle.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper, the authors compare the manual and automated process redesign on the basis of the Business Process Management (BPM) lifecycle. The results form the basis for a mathematical model that outlines the general economic characteristics of process redesign as well as for the manual and automated approaches. Subsequently, the authors exemplarily apply their model to a set of empirical data with respective assumptions on particular aspects of the automated approach.

Findings

In the problem setting described in the paper, the valuation model shows that automated process redesign induces an equal or higher number of optimized processes in a company. Therefore, the authors present a decision support that outlines how much to invest in automated process redesign.

Research limitations/implications

The model considers the cost side of automated process redesign; therefore, further research should be conducted to analyze the possibility of higher returns induced by automated redesign (e.g., through a quicker adaption to real‐world changes). Moreover, for automated redesign, there is no requirement for broad empirical data that should be collected and analyzed as soon as this approach leaves the basic research and prototyping stages.

Practical implications

This paper presents an approach that can be used by companies to estimate the upper limit for investments in manual and automated process redesign. Working under certain general assumptions and independently from actual cost and return values, the paper demonstrates that automated process redesign induces an equal or higher ratio of optimized processes. Thus, companies introducing automated redesign cannot only apply the model to evaluate their investments but can also expect a higher ratio of optimized processes for this approach.

Originality/value

As existing literature primarily focuses on the technical aspects of automated process redesign, these findings contribute to the current body of literature. This paper discusses a first decision‐support for the economic aspects of automated process redesign, particularly with regard to the investments that are required for it. This information is relevant as soon as the approach leaves the stage of a prototype.

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Article

Arijit Sikdar and Jayashree Payyazhi

Business process implementation has been primarily seen as a redesign of the workflow with the consequent organizational change assumed to be taking place automatically or…

Abstract

Purpose

Business process implementation has been primarily seen as a redesign of the workflow with the consequent organizational change assumed to be taking place automatically or through a process of “muddling through”. Although evidence suggests that 70 per cent of business process reengineering programmes have failed due to lack of alignment with corporate change strategy, the question of alignment of workflow redesign with the organizational change process has not received adequate attention. The purpose of this paper is to provide a framework for managing organizational change in a structured manner during workflow redesign, a perspective missing in the literature on business process management (BPM) implementation.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper attempts to integrate the 8-S dimensions of Higgins model across the different phases of workflow redesign to develop a process framework of managing organizational change during BPM workflow redesign. As an exploratory study the paper draws on existing literature on BPM and change alignment to conceptualize an alignment framework of associated managerial activities involved during different phases of BPM workflow redesign. The framework is evaluated against two case studies of business process implementation to substantiate how lack of alignment leads to failure in BPM implementation.

Findings

The paper provides a conceptual framework of how organizational change should be managed during BPM implementation. The model suggests the sequence of alignment of the 8-S dimensions (Higgins, 2005) with the different phases of the workflow redesign and identifies the role of the managerial levels in the organization in managing the alignment of the 8-S dimensions during business process change.

Practical implications

This framework would provide managers with an execution template of how to achieve alignment of the workflow redesign with the 8-S dimensions thus facilitating effective organizational change during business process implementation.

Originality/value

This paper proposes a process model of how organizational elements should be aligned with the workflow redesign during business process change implementation. No such model is available in BPM literature proposing alignment between hard and soft factors.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 20 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

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Article

Keedong Yoo, Euiho Suh and Kyoung‐Yun Kim

The aim of this paper is to suggest a method to redesign business processes from the viewpoint of knowledge flows using a knowledge map.

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to suggest a method to redesign business processes from the viewpoint of knowledge flows using a knowledge map.

Design/methodology/approach

Knowledge flows and business processes cannot be separated because knowledge is inputted and outputted through business processes. Knowledge flows inherit the feature and appearance of corresponding business processes; therefore, one can identify problems within business processes by analyzing corresponding knowledge flows. The methodology is composed of the following sections: knowledge mapping, knowledge profiling, knowledge flow identification, knowledge flow optimization and TO‐BE process visualization.

Findings

This paper provides a methodology for knowledge flow‐based business process redesign and ten guidelines for knowledge flow optimization. The case study demonstrates that the proposed ideas constitute knowledge‐intensified business processes.

Research limitations/implications

A more formal validation method that is based on the statistical analysis must be provided to assert the proposed guidelines for knowledge flow optimization as the truly optimized ones.

Practical implications

This paper's idea provides the practical methodology and guidelines that can be directly applicable to performing business process redesign by introducing a real case.

Originality/value

This paper's ideas not only provide present companies with a practical way to enhance their business process to be more knowledge‐focused, but also promote the current economy to be more knowledge‐intensive.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

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Article

A. Sabharwal, M. Syal and M. Hastak

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the impact of the component assemblies redesign on the material handling costs associated with the facility layout and also, on…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the impact of the component assemblies redesign on the material handling costs associated with the facility layout and also, on the productivity of the assembly process. Component assemblies are the sub‐assemblies that are incorporated into the manufactured house as it progresses on the assembly line.

Design/methodology/approach

Floor assembly is used as an example to demonstrate the impact of the component assembly redesign process. A step‐by‐step process of assembling a floor in the case study factory is described and changes to the process are proposed. The existing and redesigned floor assemblies are analyzed using the factory layout analysis models and the production simulation models.

Findings

The proposed redesign resulted in a small savings of less than 1 per cent in the material handling costs and a substantial savings of around 20 per cent in the production time.

Research limitations/implications

The work described in this paper is based on the existing floor assembly process in a case study factory. Due to the practical limitations, material handling routes and production activities associated with the redesigned assemblies were estimated. The results from this research show that redesign of component assemblies can provide potential avenues of savings for the manufactured housing industry. Such analysis can be performed for any component assembly individually or in combination with other assemblies in order to realize potential savings with relatively minor changes.

Originality/value

Production‐related research in manufactured housing has traditionally focused on either improving the facility layout or the assembly line process but not the combined impact of these two aspects. This paper presents a possible approach to investigating the combined impact by analyzing the impact of redesigned floor assembly.

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Article

Charles B. Keating, Abel A. Fernandez, Derya A. Jacobs and Paul Kauffmann

This article presents the design and application of a Modified Sociotechnical Systems (MoSTS) methodology for holistic analysis of complex technical processes. Successes…

Abstract

This article presents the design and application of a Modified Sociotechnical Systems (MoSTS) methodology for holistic analysis of complex technical processes. Successes and failures of process redesign initiatives have demonstrated the strong influence of human elements on outcomes. (Sociotechnical Systems) STS provides a foundation for structured analysis and redesign of complex processes which emphasizes human aspects in process redesign. The MoSTS methodology is developed from STS research and practice and applied to analyze a complex technical process in the research and development sector. MoSTS is shown to be an effective methodology to facilitate analysis for process redesign, particularly where human influences may have a significant impact on success. The article concludes with limitations and implications for process analysis based on the MoSTS methodology application.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

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Article

Munir Mandviwalla and Anat Hovav

This paper investigates the use of process redesign tools and techniques in education. We argue that process thinking is an important strategy for improving education. An…

Abstract

This paper investigates the use of process redesign tools and techniques in education. We argue that process thinking is an important strategy for improving education. An adaptation of business process redesign to learning is presented by integrating together concepts from educational theory, computer mediated communication, and business process redesign. Three conventional educational processes ‐ questioning, discussion, and document exchange ‐ are analyzed and redesigned with electronic mail, bulletin board, and World Wide Web technologies. The characteristics of each technology and its potential for process redesign are outlined. The results of an exploratory case study show that learning process redesign is viable and can impact ON educational outcomes. We conclude with suggestions for future research.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

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Article

Sandra G. Leggat, Richard Gough, Timothy Bartram, Pauline Stanton, Greg J. Bamber, Ruth Ballardie and Amrik Sohal

Hospitals have used process redesign to increase the efficiency of the emergency department (ED) to cope with increasing demand. While there are published studies…

Abstract

Purpose

Hospitals have used process redesign to increase the efficiency of the emergency department (ED) to cope with increasing demand. While there are published studies suggesting a positive outcome, recent reviews have reported that it is difficult to conclude that these approaches are effective as a result of substandard research methodology. The purpose of this paper is to explore the perceptions of hospital staff on the impact of a process redesign initiative on quality of care.

Design/methodology/approach

A retrospective qualitative case study examining a Lean Six Sigma (LSS) initiative in a large metropolitan hospital from 2009 to 2010. Non-probability sampling identified interview subjects who, through their participation in the redesign initiative, had a detailed understanding of the implementation and outcomes of the initiative. Between April 2012 and January 2013 26 in-depth semi-structured interviews were conducted and analysed with thematic content analysis.

Findings

There were four important findings. First, when asked to comment on the impact of the LSS implementation, without prompting the staff spoke of quality of care. Second, there was little agreement among the participants as to whether the project had been successful. Third, despite the recognition of the need for a coordinated effort across the hospital to improve ED access, the redesign process was not successful in reducing existing divides among clinicians and among managers and clinicians. Finally, staff expressed tension between production processes to move patients more quickly and their duty of care to their patients as individuals.

Originality/value

One of the first studies to explore the impact of process redesign through in-depth interviews with participating staff, this study adds further evidence that organisations implementing process redesign must ensure the supporting management practices are in place.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 30 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

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Article

Gregor Zellner

Business process redesign (BPR) is still a big issue in improving organizations and a lot of methods and techniques exist to support this undertaking. Referring to this…

Abstract

Purpose

Business process redesign (BPR) is still a big issue in improving organizations and a lot of methods and techniques exist to support this undertaking. Referring to this, the purpose of this paper is to derive a framework for identifying patterns in BPR that help in discovering new mechanisms which are indispensable to redesign and improve business processes.

Design/methodology/approach

The first part of this research process follows the principles of design science research by deriving the framework as an artifact. The second part focuses on the justification (“Justify/Evaluate”) of the framework using a literature review and a laboratory experiment.

Findings

A framework for identifying BPR pattern is derived and in parts validated by literature that helps to support the act of improving business processes. The advantages of this approach lie in the integrity of deriving possible patterns and the fact that it is not limited (as attempts in related work suffered from). The practical implications and added value of the (selected) patterns could be validated by conducting a laboratory experiment.

Research limitations/implications

The justification of the framework is based on a narrow literature review, just to show that this framework is applicable. For a more detailed evaluation a broader literature review is needed. The laboratory experiment was conducted for four patterns only. This also needs to be expanded in further research.

Practical implications

The paper is valuable for academics and practitioners because the impact of BPR on organizational performance is high. Using the identified BPR pattern facilitates the redesign of business processes, as shown in the experiment.

Originality/value

The originality of the paper lies in the possibility to easily identify BPR pattern to support the redesign of existing business processes.

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