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Article
Publication date: 28 September 2012

Juha Kettunen

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the maintenance of the process‐based quality assurance system in a higher education institution.

3066

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the maintenance of the process‐based quality assurance system in a higher education institution.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper introduces the process management as the essential element of quality assurance in higher education and discusses the external quality audit of the quality assurance agency, extends the study to the quality management between the external audits and presents the procedure of internal quality audits. Finally, the results of the study are discussed and summarised. Action research methodology was adopted in this study. The paper shows that the process‐based quality assurance system makes the organisation responsive, agile and enables the achievement of strategic objectives.

Findings

The audit group must first evaluate the necessary improvements in the process. If no improvements are found, the quality deviations must be reported. The audit helps the institution take corrective actions to amend the process descriptions or maintain the processes.

Originality/value

The paper shows that the necessary processes of a higher education institution can be systematically described and audited.

Details

The TQM Journal, vol. 24 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2731

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1990

Lisa Albitz

Discusses the requirements for building and implementing a quality measurement system. Contends it is essential that management understands the benefits of both…

Abstract

Discusses the requirements for building and implementing a quality measurement system. Contends it is essential that management understands the benefits of both measurement in general and quality measures in detail. Asserts that quality measures focus efforts providing positive and negative feedback. Contends that quality measures immediately point to the area of the process where the problem originates. Asserts that organizational quality measures provide information about how a particular organization is operating. Discusses a number of measurement models. Concludes that reviewing quality measures in a methodological manner will provide increasing opportunities for improvement.

Details

The TQM Magazine, vol. 2 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-478X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 April 2015

Malte Schröder, Sebastian Schmitt and Robert Schmitt

Business processes have an open and dynamic character and are influenced by internal an external disturbances. Without an adequate use of feedback mechanisms, those…

2520

Abstract

Purpose

Business processes have an open and dynamic character and are influenced by internal an external disturbances. Without an adequate use of feedback mechanisms, those processes become unstable and do not achieve the expected performance. The purpose of this paper is to face the challenge and to ensure a competitive quality level, a framework for entrepreneurial quality management is given.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the method of analogy formation the transfer of cybernetic approaches to business processes is shown. Especially quality control loops are analysed in order to find appropriate solutions for their design and implementation in enterprises.

Findings

As a core element of the paper an approach for the systematic implementation of control loops is given. This approach offers a framework and a description for an operative implementation of quality control loops for stable business processes.

Originality/value

The idea to use closed quality control loops for the design of several processes is already known. Anyway, both a robust framework and a appropriate, sufficient and detailed description for an operative implementation is the new aspect and an important further development within the topic.

Details

The TQM Journal, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2731

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Managing Urban Mobility Systems
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85-724611-0

Article
Publication date: 3 December 2021

Qin Chen, Jiahua Jin and Xiangbin Yan

Although online health communities (OHCs) and online patient reviews can help to eliminate health information asymmetry and improve patients' health management, how…

Abstract

Purpose

Although online health communities (OHCs) and online patient reviews can help to eliminate health information asymmetry and improve patients' health management, how patients write online reviews within OHCs is poorly understood. Thus, it is very necessary to determine the factors influencing patients' online review behavior in OHCs, including the emotional response and reviewing effort.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on expectation-disconfirmation theory, this study proposes a theoretical model to analyze the effects of service quality perception (i.e. outcome quality and process quality perceptions) and disconfirmation (i.e. outcome quality and process quality disconfirmations) on patients' emotional response and reviewing effort. The authors test the research model by using empirical data collected from a popular Chinese OHC and applying ordinary least squares (OLS) regression and zero-truncated negative binomial (ZTNB) regression models.

Findings

Both service quality perception and disconfirmation have a positive effect on patients' positive emotional intensity in textual reviews, and disease severity enhances these relationships of process quality. Moreover, there is an asymmetric U-shaped relationship among service quality perception, disconfirmation and reviewing effort. Patients who perceive low service quality have higher reviewing effort, while service quality disconfirmation has the opposite relationship. Specifically, patients' effort in writing textual reviews is lowest when perceived outcome quality is 3.5 (on a five-point scale), perceived process quality is 4 or outcome quality and process quality disconfirmations are −1.

Originality/value

This study is the first to examine patients' online review behavior and its motivations and contributes to the literature on online reviews and service quality. In addition, the findings of this study have important management implications for service providers and OHC managers.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 27 July 2021

José C.M. Franken, Desirée H. van Dun and Celeste P.M. Wilderom

As a problem-solving tool, the kaizen event (KE) is underutilised in practice. Assuming this is due to a lack of group process quality during those events, the authors…

1789

Abstract

Purpose

As a problem-solving tool, the kaizen event (KE) is underutilised in practice. Assuming this is due to a lack of group process quality during those events, the authors aimed to grasp what is needed during high-quality KE meetings. Guided by the phased approach for structured problem-solving, the authors built and explored a measure for enriching future KE research.

Design/methodology/approach

Six phases were used to code all verbal contributions (N = 5,442) in 21 diverse, videotaped KE meetings. Resembling state space grids, the authors visualised the course of each meeting with line graphs which were shown to ten individual kaizen experts as well as to the filmed kaizen groups.

Findings

From their reactions to the graphs the authors extracted high-quality KE process characteristics. At the end of each phase, that should be enacted sequentially, explicit group consensus appeared to be crucial. Some of the groups spent too little time on a group-shared understanding of the problem and its root causes. Surprisingly, the mixed-methods data suggested that small and infrequent deviations (“jumps”) to another phase might be necessary for a high-quality process. According to the newly developed quantitative process measure, when groups often jump from one phase to a distant, previous or next phase, this relates to low KE process quality.

Originality/value

A refined conceptual model and research agenda are offered for generating better solutions during KEs, and the authors urge examinations of the effects of well-crafted KE training.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 41 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 May 2017

Sarina Abdul Halim Lim, Jiju Antony, Zhen He and Norin Arshed

Statistical process control (SPC) is widely applied for control and improve processes in manufacturing, but very few studies have reported on the successful application of…

1381

Abstract

Purpose

Statistical process control (SPC) is widely applied for control and improve processes in manufacturing, but very few studies have reported on the successful application of SPC in the food industry, in particular. The purpose of this paper is to critically assess the status of SPC in the UK food manufacturing industry and to suggest future research avenues.

Design/methodology/approach

A research project was carried out in the UK food manufacturing sector through questionnaires. The results of the study were analysed using descriptive statistics and statistical tests to be applied in the hypothesis testing.

Findings

Findings revealed that 45 per cent of the respondents are SPC users and x ¯ -R and x ¯ -S charts are the most commonly applied SPC charts in this industry. It was determined that top management commitment is the most critical factor, while lack of SPC training is the most alarming challenge, and lack of awareness of SPC and its benefits are the main reasons for the food companies not implementing SPC.

Research limitations/implications

The study considered only the food manufacturing companies. Future research could be addressed toward the food service and food supply chain.

Practical implications

The paper provides information to food companies in the UK on most common practiced and important quality tools, SPC charts and critical success factors in the food industry. Moreover, the most challenging factors of SPC implementation in the food industry are presented.

Originality/value

This study depicted the current state of SPC practices in the food industry and the process performance in SPC and non-SPC companies is compared.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 34 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 June 2011

Evangelos L. Psomas, Christos V. Fotopoulos and Dimitrios P. Kafetzopoulos

The purpose of this paper is to determine, first, the level to which ISO 9001 certified manufacturing companies adopt process management and improve quality, second, the…

5186

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine, first, the level to which ISO 9001 certified manufacturing companies adopt process management and improve quality, second, the latent factors of process management and quality improvement, and finally, the relationships between the latent factors extracted.

Design/methodology/approach

A research project was carried out in 196 ISO 9001 certified manufacturing companies operating in Greece. A structured questionnaire was designed and pilot tested and then addressed to management representatives of the companies. Descriptive statistics were used in order to determine the level of process management adoption and the level of quality improvement. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were also applied to extract the latent factors of process management and quality improvement and to assess their reliability and validity. The relationships between the latent factors were determined through structural equation modelling.

Findings

Two latent factors were extracted with respect to process management (the core process management practices and the supporting quality tools) and one latent factor with respect to quality improvement. The findings revealed that the ISO 9001 certified manufacturing companies implement to a high degree of the core process management practices, in contrast to the supporting quality tools. Notwithstanding, significant quality improvement is achieved. According to the structural model, the core process management practices have a strong, positive and direct effect on quality improvement. The supporting quality tools have an indirect effect on quality improvement through their significant correlation with the core process management practices.

Originality/value

This paper describes a reliable and valid model that analyzes process management in two latent factors (the core process management practices and the supporting quality tools). The model also depicts the effects of these latent factors on quality improvement of ISO 9001 certified manufacturing companies.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 April 2012

Kim O'Mahony and Thomas N. Garavan

This paper aims to report and analyse the lessons learned from a case study on the implementation of a quality management system within an IT Division in a higher…

3431

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to report and analyse the lessons learned from a case study on the implementation of a quality management system within an IT Division in a higher education (HE) organisation.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on a review of the relevant literatures and the use of primary sources such as document analysis, participant observation and interviews to develop a case study that describes and evaluates the implementation process.

Findings

The case study identifies four factors central to the effective implementation of the quality management system within a Division of a HE institution: senior leadership and sponsorship; stakeholder engagement; the management of culture change; and implementing quality processes.

Practical implications

The case study reveals that the implementation of quality management systems requires sustained effort, continuous leadership, and the long term commitment of resources and systematic auditing of performance and is best done on an incremental basis.

Originality/value

The paper is based on a single organisation case study, and utilises a variety of data collection methods to generate findings. The study findings illustrate that HE institutions may achieve greater success in implementing quality management systems if they focus on a particular division rather than an organisation‐wide approach.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 June 2011

Daniel I. Prajogo and Christopher M. McDermott

This paper aims to examine the relationship between the four cultural dimensions of the competing values framework (CVF) (group, developmental, hierarchical, and rational…

11874

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the relationship between the four cultural dimensions of the competing values framework (CVF) (group, developmental, hierarchical, and rational cultures) and four types of performance: product quality, process quality, product innovation, and process innovation. Theoretically, this represents the contrasts among the four quadrants of CVF in terms of their respective outcomes, with quality and innovation reflecting the contrast between control and flexibility orientations, and product and process reflecting the contrast between external and internal orientations.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 194 middle and senior managers of Australian firms who had knowledge of past and present organizational practices relating to quality and innovation‐related aspects in the organization.

Findings

Developmental culture was found to be the strongest predictor among the four cultural dimensions, as it shows relationships with three of the performance measures: product quality, product innovation, and process innovation. Rational culture shows a relationship with product quality, and along with group and hierarchical cultures, it also plays a role in predicting process quality.

Practical implications

The results provide key insights for managers to appropriately understand the fit between the culture and the strategic direction of the firm. The findings also encourage firms to appreciate the balanced view on what seems to be multiple cultural characteristics within the same organization.

Originality/value

By simultaneously examining the relationships between different cultural dimensions and different types of performance, this paper extends the previous empirical studies which linked CVF with a specific measure of performance.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 31 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 226000