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Article

F. Soliman

Process mapping is an essential tool for business process re‐engineering. During the initial steps of business process re‐engineering process mapping is used to evaluate…

Abstract

Process mapping is an essential tool for business process re‐engineering. During the initial steps of business process re‐engineering process mapping is used to evaluate the existing processes and to identify their non‐value added activities. Presents a method for determining the most economical way to determine the levels of process mapping for the purpose of re‐designing. Using this approach, the process designer can determine how many levels of process mapping are required for a given process and how much it is likely to cost. Accordingly, this approach is a more realistic tool for budgeting for process mapping costs and for determining the cost‐effective level of mapping. This approach is based on balancing the usefulness against the cost of collecting the information through process mapping. The main benefit from this approach is an overall reduction in the cost of business process re‐engineering. Therefore this approach may be referred to as the least cost process mapping. This is because this method can be used to determine the optimum level of process mapping and the least cost of process mapping.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 18 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article

Kiran Jude Fernandes, Vinesh Raja and Jiju Antony

Today’s business world is facing a plethora of managerial and technological changes which are beyond the capacity of any firm to control or absorb. Customer satisfaction…

Abstract

Today’s business world is facing a plethora of managerial and technological changes which are beyond the capacity of any firm to control or absorb. Customer satisfaction, development of new products, and introduction of new technologies are well‐known driving forces, but their fast mutation and turmoil are making them unpredictable. Companies have to radically alter their strategic and process goals to keep up with this volatile market. In this turbulent environment, business process reengineering (BPR) has evolved as the most promising approach for designing organizations. It is extremely important for reengineers to understand the “driving” forces in this environment. One of the most important and fundamental drivers is understanding the goals (goal mapping) of the organization. Typically the goals of organizations are derived from the “voice of the customer”. In this paper we address a procedure by which optimum level of goal mapping can be considered in the preliminary stages of BPR. A cost optimization model for goal mapping is proposed using an example from the Space Shuttle Testing Facility at the SSC‐National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

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Book part

Kristy White

In this chapter, I argue, contrary to some current views, that workflow process mapping can be an important and relevant tool for assessing and improving the effectiveness…

Abstract

In this chapter, I argue, contrary to some current views, that workflow process mapping can be an important and relevant tool for assessing and improving the effectiveness and efficiency of library Technical Services departments. I also propose that linking workflow process mapping to the “High Performance” style of organizational management of W. Edwards Deming underlines both the value of process mapping and how the latter can obviate the need for hierarchical managerial control, by building a cohesive and efficient technical services team. First, I describe the “High Performance” management style of Deming, focusing in particular on what is generally called the “Deming Cycle.” Second, I describe the process of mapping workflows and emphasize its value for highlighting waste, improving existing processes, and maintaining sustainability. Third, I argue that linking workflow mapping to this larger understanding of management style results in several positive consequences for technical services departments, such as a team-based rather than hierarchical style of management, increased departmental and interdepartmental effectiveness and efficiency, and a better return on investment. I illustrate these points by looking directly at an example of an acquisitions department.

Details

Technical Services in the 21st Century
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-829-3

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Article

Jan Riezebos and Babette Huisman

Teachers of primary education experience high levels of stress but lack rational coping strategies to reduce their work stress. The paper develops a value stream mapping

Abstract

Purpose

Teachers of primary education experience high levels of stress but lack rational coping strategies to reduce their work stress. The paper develops a value stream mapping for education approach and examines its use as a rational coping strategy for teams of teachers and other employees to overcome work-related stressors.

Design/methodology/approach

The research process consists of two phases. First, a value stream mapping approach for education is developed, based on literature research. Next, the approach is validated in an action research study to reduce work stress of teachers in educational services. The processes that have been selected by the teachers relate to coping with increased variety, long and uncertain throughput times and unclear specifications.

Findings

Value stream mapping for education (VSM4EDU) is a well-structured improvement method based on principles of visualization, participation and process thinking, which helps teachers without background in lean thinking to analyse their processes. Using this method has enabled the team to develop rational coping strategies to reduce their work-related stress.

Research limitations/implications

VSM4EDU has been validated using action research at a single school, which implicates deep insight, but further testing at other schools is welcome. Moreover, VSM4EDU has not been used to develop a future state map.

Practical implications

Value stream mapping is useful in educational settings as long as the educational context is respected in the approach.

Social implications

VSM4EDU empowers teachers and helps to develop co-operation in teams.

Originality/value

The validation of value stream mapping for education is well-documented and original.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 38 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article

Sarah Barbrow and Megan Hartline

The purpose of this paper is to describe the value of process mapping to libraries as a first step in promoting a culture of organizational assessment. In addition, this…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the value of process mapping to libraries as a first step in promoting a culture of organizational assessment. In addition, this paper offers a case study of the University of Michigan Library’s experience in building up a process mapping skill set and the workflow improvements resulting from these efforts.

Design/methodology/approach

This case study is a description and assessment of a program to train library employees on process mapping.

Findings

Process mapping in library settings empowers librarians and staff to identify and implement elements for improvements in routine work. When given the tools to assess processes, employees at the University of Michigan made several such improvements.

Practical implications

While library staff tend not to be familiar with process mapping, these skills are critical for retaining institutional knowledge, training staff, and identifying areas for improvement in common and rarely used workflows alike.

Originality/value

Process improvements were identified and implemented at the University of Michigan Library when the staff mapped the processes of their daily work.

Details

Performance Measurement and Metrics, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-8047

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Article

Leidy Klotz, Michael Horman, Henry H. Bi and John Bechtel

Process mapping is used to articulate the activities and procedures of business entities in a graphical way as pictorial images readily convey considerable information…

Abstract

Purpose

Process mapping is used to articulate the activities and procedures of business entities in a graphical way as pictorial images readily convey considerable information. The objective of this research is to provide evidence and a methodology to assist organizations in evaluating the early stages of their process mapping efforts.

Design/methodology/approach

A review of literature identifies key characteristics of transparency (process visibility) related to process mapping. Quizzes and surveys are used to study the impact of process mapping on transparency in an employee training session.

Findings

The paper finds that process mapping increases transparency between 5 percent and 27 percent for the applications discussed in this paper.

Research limitations/implications

The research presumes that better understanding and recall of the company's business processes equates to higher transparency. This research study is limited to one field test, organization, and process mapping methodology. These limitations should be considered when extrapolating the results to other organizations.

Practical implications

The methodology outlined in this paper provides a way to measure the impact that formalizing (mapping) an organization's business processes and then using these maps to communicate the organization's business processes has on an individual employee's understanding and recall of those business processes. This methodology may help other organizations evaluate the early stages of their process mapping efforts.

Originality/value

A measurable definition of transparency is developed. A field study provides evidence that process mapping increases transparency and a methodology is shared for others to study the impacts of their process mapping efforts.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 57 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

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Article

Jan Fülscher and Stephen G. Powell

Many tools are in use for representing and analyzing business processes, but little information is available on how these tools are used in practice by process design…

Abstract

Many tools are in use for representing and analyzing business processes, but little information is available on how these tools are used in practice by process design teams. This paper analyzes one process mapping workshop in detail. Over three days, two facilitators and five representatives of the organization and business functions redesigned the core auto insurance business at a mid‐size Swiss insurance company. The mapping tool used during the session was IDEF0. The purpose of this paper is to share our experiences in using IDEF0 in the workshop setting. In addition to a narrative description of the workshop, we offer our observations on how such workshops can be conducted effectively and on the strengths and weaknesses of IDEF0 in this context. The final business process map did not emerge from a logical, linear development process. Rather, the workshop was characterized by constant refinement and development of an existing structure, punctuated by an occasional radical idea that forced the group to throw out the current process and start over. The hierarchical approach of IDEF0 proved critical in keeping the group focused on its task of abstracting the essence of the process itself from the details of current practice. The mapping tool proved to be less convenient for representing a sequence of events in time, multiple cases, and conditional flows of work.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

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Article

Intae Kang, Yongtae Park and Yeongho Kim

A complete form of knowledge management system comprises both process management and contents management. Process management is concerned with handling activities to…

Abstract

A complete form of knowledge management system comprises both process management and contents management. Process management is concerned with handling activities to generate and utilize knowledge, whereas contents management deals with knowledge contents themselves. Workflow, considered as a core component of process management, is to define and administer business processes automatically. A knowledge map is a representation tool to visualize knowledge sources and relationships among knowledge artifacts. Noting the crucial needs to integrate process management and contents management and recognizing that previous research has paid little attention to this issue, we propose a framework for developing a workflow‐based knowledge map. The proposed process‐perspective knowledge map takes the structure of processes and tasks defined in workflow into account. We then materialize the framework by developing a prototype and applying it to the car seat design process of the automobile industry. The integration represents an exploratory effort to combine process management and contents management.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

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Book part

Stan Aungst, Russell R. Barton and David T. Wilson

Quality Function Deployment (QFD) proposes to take into account the “voice of the customer,” through a list of customer needs, which are (qualitatively) mapped to…

Abstract

Quality Function Deployment (QFD) proposes to take into account the “voice of the customer,” through a list of customer needs, which are (qualitatively) mapped to technical requirements in House One. But customers do not perceive products in this space, nor do they not make purchase decisions in this space. Marketing specialists use statistical models to map between a simpler space of customer perceptions and the long and detailed list of needs. For automobiles, for example, the main axes in perceptual space might be categories such as luxury, performance, sport, and utility. A product’s position on these few axes determines the detailed customer requirements consistent with the automobiles’ position such as interior volume, gauges and accessories, seating type, fuel economy, door height, horsepower, interior noise level, seating capacity, paint colors, trim, and so forth. Statistical models such as factor analysis and principal components analysis are used to describe the mapping between these spaces, which we call House Zero.

This paper focus on House One. Two important steps of the product development process using House One are: (1) setting technical targets; (2) identifying the inherent tradeoffs in a design including a position of merit. Utility functions are used to determine feature preferences for a product. Conjoint analysis is used to capture the product preference and potential market share. Linear interpolation and the slope point formula are used to determine other points of customer needs. This research draws from the formal mapping concepts developed by Nam Suh and the qualitative maps of quality function deployment, to present unified information and mapping paradigm for concurrent product/process design. This approach is the virtual integrated design method that is tested upon data from a business design problem.

Details

Evaluating Marketing Actions and Outcomes
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-046-3

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Article

N.N. Ekere, E.K. Lo and S.H. Mannan

This paper presents a technique for mapping the modelling of manufacturing processes, in which process maps are used to represent information on the models and modelling…

Abstract

This paper presents a technique for mapping the modelling of manufacturing processes, in which process maps are used to represent information on the models and modelling technique (including assumptions used), process and equipment parameters, physical sub‐processes, process variables, and the process performance in terms of quality and/or defects. The mapping approach uses the top‐down methodology, in which any manufacturing process can be represented in a structured, multi‐layered manner, with each layer representing a different level of the modelling spectrum. This structure is designed to provide a clear overview of the process and sub‐processes, and their interactions, while the finer details of the modelling process are still presented at the lower levels of the map. This mapping approach is illustrated with the modelling of the Printing of Solder Paste for the reflow soldering of SMT devices. This case study shows how the mapping process can be used to identify the key research issues, specify the experimental work required, and also identify the analytical modelling techniques which are appropriate for each process (and sub‐process).

Details

Soldering & Surface Mount Technology, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-0911

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