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Article
Publication date: 24 November 2020

Hadi Balouei Jamkhaneh and Abdol Hamid Safaei Ghadikolaei

The aim of this study is to develop a framework for measuring of service supply chain (SSC) maturity process.

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study is to develop a framework for measuring of service supply chain (SSC) maturity process.

Design/methodology/approach

The main framework of the SSC maturity was developed by reviewing the concepts and models of SSC, business excellence, maturity and supply chain performance evaluation. Then, the maturity level of each excellence criterion was defined in the proposed model by using the excellence criteria for SSC and the concept of Plan, Do, Check and Act (PDCA) cycle in combination with the process survey tools maturity model. Based on the excellence criteria and their maturity levels, a questionnaire was designed to practically measure the proposed framework.

Findings

The concepts and features of maturity levels defined for each of the excellence criteria were used to implement and operationalize the proposed framework and evaluate the SSC processes.

Practical implications

Through the assessment of the existing status of SSC processes, the findings allow managers to reach a better understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of such processes. Then, some opportunities are provided for improving each excellence criterion to enhance the performance of each process.

Originality/value

In fact, this study provides guidelines for organizations to measure their progress and performance and improve their management systems. The main advantages of the proposed SSC measurement framework include self-assessment facilitation, calculation of criteria scores and development of uses. The proposed model, like quality and productivity awards, can pave the way for increased competitiveness of the service industry.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

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Book part
Publication date: 21 December 2017

Phil Wood

With the introduction of the Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF), the status of teaching has been moved towards the centre of concerns in the UK higher education (HE…

Abstract

With the introduction of the Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF), the status of teaching has been moved towards the centre of concerns in the UK higher education (HE) sector. This interest develops further the notion of teaching excellence created through various institutional and sectoral schemes such as the Higher Education Academy (HEA) fellowship. Whilst excellence schemes and the TEF all highlight the importance of teaching, they also run the danger of reducing it to lists and simplified proxies.

This chapter argues that reductive characterisations of teaching, through metrics supporting the TEF, such as the national student survey, or ‘idealised’ descriptions of the foundational aspects of ‘excellent practice’, all lead to partial accounts of the teaching process. Such characterisations might lead to creeping performativity and increasing organisational attempts to control. An alternative account of teaching is proposed based on complexity theory. This sees teaching as emergent, multifaceted and contextually based. It refutes notions of ‘best practice’ and argues that any attempt to capture ‘excellent practice’ is to reduce the holistic nature of the processes that bring teaching, learning, curriculum and assessment together.

Details

Teaching Excellence in Higher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-761-4

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Article
Publication date: 23 August 2013

Andrew Parris

This paper describes World Vision ' s motivation, context, experience, and learning in improving processes in East Africa. It demonstrates that Lean and Six Sigma…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper describes World Vision ' s motivation, context, experience, and learning in improving processes in East Africa. It demonstrates that Lean and Six Sigma TQM approaches apply to an international non-governmental organisation (INGO) operating in East Africa, and that they can deliver significant process improvements.

Design/methodology/approach

The findings come from initiating process improvement in World Vision in East Africa, observing and reflecting on this experience, and measuring improvements achieved through process improvement projects conducted by World Vision East African staff.

Findings

The INGO and East African contexts provide unique challenges to and demonstrate a strong need for process excellence. However, a standard process improvement approach can be used. A key segment of World Vision staff in East Africa has caught the vision of process excellence, understood and applied TQM concepts and tools, and significantly improved key processes, for example, reduced by 40-80 per cent the average time to procure items and recruit new staff. We have reduced annual expenses by nearly $1,000,000. Such improvements help World Vision to achieve better outcomes with existing funding, people, and other resources.

Originality/value

This paper demonstrates that Lean and Six Sigma apply to and are vital for both NGOs and the East African context. It describes World Vision Process Excellence and improvements achieved. It presents challenges faced and lessons learned along the way. Finally, it calls on others to join the Lean Six Sigma TQM journey in NGOs and East Africa.

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Article
Publication date: 6 July 2015

Neeta Baporikar and MV Deshpande

This study aims to identify the approaches and strategies adopted by Pune auto-component small and medium enterprises (SMEs) to achieve excellence with an in-depth…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to identify the approaches and strategies adopted by Pune auto-component small and medium enterprises (SMEs) to achieve excellence with an in-depth literature review and deep observation. SMEs’ contribution is acknowledged worldwide. Auto-component SMEs, a major sub-sector and largest feeder of automobile manufacturing, have placed India on the global map for excellence and innovation. Like the corporate, SMEs have also started adopting integrated approaches and strategies to face the competitive world, yet incidences of unproductive SMEs are rising. Business breakdown is attributed to capital deficiency and incompetent usage. Amidst this, Pune auto-component SMEs are thriving well.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents an in-depth literature review and deep observation.

Findings

Findings include identifying the approaches and strategies adopted by Pune auto-component SMEs to achieve excellence.

Originality/value

This paper identified the approaches and strategies for achieving excellence and the basis of innovation in SMEs.

Details

Journal of Science & Technology Policy Management, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-4620

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1996

Martin Fojt

To underestimate service quality is like saying goodbye to some of your hard‐earned profits. Even after revamping and upgrading products, manyorganizations continue to…

Abstract

To underestimate service quality is like saying goodbye to some of your hard‐earned profits. Even after revamping and upgrading products, many organizations continue to experience decline because they forget that people want to feel good. The feel‐good factor is espoused by politicians throughout the world to nurture votes. The fact that people want to feel good is often overlooked and ignores Maslow’s hierarchy of needs. How many times have you bought a product only to find there is a fault and the product needs replacing? This is normally something which is very irritating, but not ulcer‐inducing enough to get worked up about until, that is, the customer service department treats you as though it is your fault.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 10 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 20 June 2016

M. Vijaya Sunder

This paper aims to illustrate the application of Lean Six Sigma (LSS) in higher education institutions (HEIs). A real-time case study presented as part of the paper…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to illustrate the application of Lean Six Sigma (LSS) in higher education institutions (HEIs). A real-time case study presented as part of the paper highlights the value which LSS can bring to the higher education system.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper commences with an overview and the success of the LSS methodology. The uniqueness of the higher education system for imbibing quality excellence is elaborated, comparing it with the manufacturing industry. Various opportunities for LSS projects in HEIs are then discussed as part of the paper. The last section of the paper elaborates a real-time case study, explaining how LSS was leveraged to improve a university library process.

Findings

The study identified the key attributes of the higher education system, which need to be understood for imbibing quality excellence. The study also provided an insight into the upcoming application of LSS and the benefits it can bring to HEIs.

Practical implications

The introduction of LSS into the higher education setup could bring multifold organizational and social benefits

Originality/value

LSS has been successful in the past few decades in the manufacturing and service sector. However, its application in HEIs was very nascent. This study illustrates its importance and application to a highly responsible area of the service sector, for imbibing quality excellence, serving as an excellent resource for researchers and higher education professionals.

Details

International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-669X

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

George Elliott

I once heard an employee say: “If this company would only treat me as well as they do their machine tools, I would be a happy camper. They are constantly spending money on…

Abstract

I once heard an employee say: “If this company would only treat me as well as they do their machine tools, I would be a happy camper. They are constantly spending money on testing, upgrading, monitoring and attempting to get the best they can from their machine tool investment. Their consistent objective is Six‐Sigma production quality.” An interesting thought …

Details

Handbook of Business Strategy, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1077-5730

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Article
Publication date: 10 July 2017

Liudvika Leisyte, Mantas Vilkas, Egle Staniskiene and Daiva Zostautiene

The purpose of this paper is to understand how the countervailing processes for enhancing academic excellence based on professional norms are balanced out with the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand how the countervailing processes for enhancing academic excellence based on professional norms are balanced out with the market-oriented processes of standardisation and performance management in a university. Further, the authors aim to explore how and if organisational learning occurs in balancing these processes.

Design/methodology/approach

The longitudinal, inductive three-year study of a higher education institution in Lithuania was used to understand how a higher education institution based on the norms of academic excellence was balanced out with the market-oriented processes and what mechanisms of leaning took place during the process. The authors drew upon three data sources – archival materials, observation and interviews with academic staff and administrators – to capture the processes of rebalancing and learning.

Findings

A complex balance is observed between the strive for academic excellence and market relevance. Market relevance has been the dominant reform tone for the central administration of a Lithuanian university (LTU), while maintenance of academic excellence prevailed among academic staff. The LTU manages the countervailing processes by standardising, financialising, surveying and disciplining. The rebalancing resulted in dissent from the academic community. Organisational learning could be observed in the example of the introduction of a new examination procedure, while it could not occur during the process of new performance management system introduction. The process led to mutual distrust between the academic staff and the management of the LTU.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the literature on organisational learning in higher education, showing how an eager entrepreneurial university engages in the reform process and how it engages in the complex balancing of countervailing processes of academic excellence and market relevance. The authors contribute with empirical evidence on how rebalancing processes in a professional organisation works and what limitations it faces. The study shows the vital multi-stakeholder involvement and understanding of the process of change. The authors further contribute to the discussion on the adoption factors of performance-based systems and the process of institutionalisation using a longitudinal perspective as called for in previous research.

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Article
Publication date: 28 June 2011

Robin Mann, Dotun Adebanjo and Matthew Tickle

The purpose of this research is to investigate the use of business excellence in Asian organisations. The study examines the effectiveness of business excellence in the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to investigate the use of business excellence in Asian organisations. The study examines the effectiveness of business excellence in the organisations that adopt it as well as the approaches used to deploy business excellence. Finally, the study investigates the attitudes of organisations with respect to business excellence awards.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire survey of 74 organisations across five Asian countries was carried out in order to collect quantitative data. In addition, qualitative data was collected from 21 discussion groups held in all five countries and from 13 interviews held with senior executives of organisations that had won business excellence awards.

Findings

The organisations believe that business excellence is important in helping them reach their organisational goals. The results also show that participation in and winning business excellence awards is a key objective for many organisations in the region. However, the region still suffers from some barriers to long‐term commitment to business excellence including lack of development of a business excellence culture, a lack of resources and a failure to fully educate the majority of staff in business excellence.

Research limitations/implications

The study was directed at organisations that were deploying business excellence. It therefore provides an insight into their activities but it does not explore levels of adoption of business excellence in the study countries and consequently, does not investigate reasons for non‐adoption in organisations that have not used business excellence.

Practical implications

National productivity organisations and national award administrators have a crucial role to play in ensuring that Asian organisations are aware of business excellence initiatives and that the necessary support structures and activities to facilitate deployment are made available.

Originality/value

While there are many studies on the adoption of business excellence in western countries, no such studies have been carried out in Asian countries to date. Even in the west, few studies have obtained the views of so many national award winners (30 in this study) and few have investigated the role of the award administrators. Given that the adoption of business excellence in Asia lags western countries, it is important to understand how it has been adopted in Asia and the perceptions of the organisations that have adopted it.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 28 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article
Publication date: 12 February 2018

Christoph Fuchs, Daniel Beck, Bernhard Lienland and Florian Kellner

The purpose of this paper is to explore the impact of information technology (IT) on supply chain performance in the automotive industry. Prior studies that analyzed the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the impact of information technology (IT) on supply chain performance in the automotive industry. Prior studies that analyzed the impact of IT on supply chain performance report results representing the situation of the “average industry.” This research focuses on the automotive industry because of its major importance in many national economies and due to the fact that automotive supply chains do not represent the supply chain of the average industry.

Design/methodology/approach

A research model is proposed to examine the relationships between IT capabilities, supply chain capabilities, and supplier performance. The model divides IT capabilities into functional and data capabilities, and supply chain capabilities into internal process excellence and information sharing. Data have been collected from 343 automotive first-tier suppliers. Structural equation modeling with partial least squares is used to analyze the data.

Findings

The results suggest that functional capabilities have the greatest impact on internal process excellence, which in turn enhances supplier performance. However, frequent and adequate information sharing also contributes significantly to supplier performance. Data capabilities enable supply chain capabilities through their positive impact on functional capabilities.

Practical implications

The findings will help managers to understand the effect of IT implementation on company performance and to decide whether to invest in the expansion of IT capacities.

Originality/value

This research reports the impact of IT on supply chain performance in one of the most important industries in many industrialized countries, and it provides a new perspective on evaluating the contribution of IT on firm performance.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

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