Search results

1 – 10 of over 8000
Article
Publication date: 30 November 2004

Ali H. Muhammad

This article examines the relationship among participation in decision‐making, employee’s perceptions of procedural justice and employee citizenship behavior. An…

1184

Abstract

This article examines the relationship among participation in decision‐making, employee’s perceptions of procedural justice and employee citizenship behavior. An employee’s perceptions of procedural justice is proposed to mediate the relationship between participation in decisionmaking and employee citizenship behavior. Data from 266 employees from 12 Kuwait business organizations indicate that: (1) participation in decision‐making is positively related to procedural justice perceptions, and (2) procedural justice perceptions mediate the relationship between participation in decision‐making and one of two organizational citizenship behavior dimensions.

Details

International Journal of Commerce and Management, vol. 14 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1056-9219

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 10 June 2015

Russell Cropanzano, Marion Fortin and Jessica F. Kirk

Justice rules are standards that serve as criteria for formulating fairness judgments. Though justice rules play a role in the organizational justice literature, they have…

Abstract

Justice rules are standards that serve as criteria for formulating fairness judgments. Though justice rules play a role in the organizational justice literature, they have seldom been the subject of analysis in their own right. To address this limitation, we first consider three meta-theoretical dualities that are highlighted by justice rules – the distinction between justice versus fairness, indirect versus direct measurement, and normative versus descriptive paradigms. Second, we review existing justice rules and organize them into four types of justice: distributive (e.g., equity, equality), procedural (e.g., voice, consistent treatment), interpersonal (e.g., politeness, respectfulness), and informational (e.g., candor, timeliness). We also emphasize emergent rules that have not received sufficient research attention. Third, we consider various computation models purporting to explain how justice rules are assessed and aggregated to form fairness judgments. Fourth and last, we conclude by reviewing research that enriches our understanding of justice rules by showing how they are cognitively processed. We observe that there are a number of influences on fairness judgments, and situations exist in which individuals do not systematically consider justice rules.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-016-6

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2014

Robert J. Parker, James M. Kohlmeyer, Sakthi Mahenthirian and Terry Sincich

Prior studies in accounting argue that subordinates have private information about their areas of responsibility and that revelation of such information benefits the…

Abstract

Purpose

Prior studies in accounting argue that subordinates have private information about their areas of responsibility and that revelation of such information benefits the organization. This study investigates factors that encourage subordinates to share this information with their superiors during the budgeting process. According to the proposed theory, the fairness of the budgeting system, specifically its procedural justice, influences the degree of information sharing. If the subordinate believes that budgeting procedures are fair, the subordinate is more likely to disclose private information during the budgeting process.

Design/methodology/approach

We conduct an anonymous survey of supervisors and managers in four companies. Regression model is developed with information sharing as the dependent variable. Independent variables include procedural justice of budgeting system and also budget participation and organizational commitment, variables that prior studies have identified as important in information sharing.

Findings

Results support the proposed model in general. The three independent variables (procedural justice, budget participation, commitment) interact in their effect on information sharing.

Research limitations/implications

Results suggest that companies that seek the private information of subordinates should consider the fairness of the budgeting system. Fair procedures encourage information exchange.

Details

Advances in Management Accounting
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-632-3

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 6 June 2006

Jody Clay-Warner

Research consistently finds that procedural justice affects emotional reactions to inequity. This research, however, has failed to examine the ways in which contextual…

Abstract

Research consistently finds that procedural justice affects emotional reactions to inequity. This research, however, has failed to examine the ways in which contextual factors may alter the impact of fair procedures on emotions. Here, I argue that collective legitimacy is one such contextual factor, and I develop hypotheses related to this argument. I also suggest that procedural justice researchers should examine discrete emotions, because the combined effects of legitimacy and procedural justice vary depending upon the emotion in question. In highlighting the interplay between legitimacy and procedural justice, this paper also underscores the necessity of studying procedural justice within the context of the group.

Details

Advances in Group Processes
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-330-3

Article
Publication date: 24 May 2022

Phan Dinh Nguyen and Lobel Trong Thuy Tran

This study conceptualizes job engagement and satisfaction as a crucial mediating mechanism in the relationship between procedural justice and citizenship behavior at…

Abstract

Purpose

This study conceptualizes job engagement and satisfaction as a crucial mediating mechanism in the relationship between procedural justice and citizenship behavior at individual level (OCB) under the boundary conditions of perceived supervisor support (PSS) and rewards and recognition (RR).

Design/methodology/approach

The survey data were obtained from two periods of time. To reduce the potential bias, the authors approached respondents from different business units and measured RR and OCB from different points of time. The authors assessed the path significance at 95% bias-corrected confidence interval or more by the PLS algorithm and bootstrapping statistics.

Findings

Using an import-export company data, this study substantiates a positive effect of the proposed mediational mechanism of job engagement and satisfaction. In addition, the authors substantiate moderating roles of PSS and RR in the relationships between procedural justice and job satisfaction and, between job engagement and OCB, respectively.

Originality/value

This study is an important extension in enhancing the procedural justice and OCB relationship. The results do not only underscore the contributions of job engagement and satisfaction as vital mediators to the assumed relationship but also lend support to the inclusion of the moderating effects of PSS and RR.

Details

Evidence-based HRM: a Global Forum for Empirical Scholarship, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-3983

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 July 2021

Natasha S. Madon and Kristina Murphy

Since 9/11, Muslims have experienced discrimination and scrutiny from authorities. For many, this experience has damaged their trust in law enforcement and left them with…

Abstract

Purpose

Since 9/11, Muslims have experienced discrimination and scrutiny from authorities. For many, this experience has damaged their trust in law enforcement and left them with the impression that they are viewed as suspect. This study seeks to better understand the relationship between Muslims' perceived police bias and trust, and how procedural justice may shape this relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors collected survey data from 398 Muslims in Sydney, Australia, as part of a larger study on immigrants' views of police. Participants were surveyed on a range of topics including contact with police, global assessments of police procedural justice and how they believe police treat their cultural group.

Findings

Overall, the authors find that the extent to which people perceive police bias is associated with their level of trust in police. Greater preconceived bias is associated with lower trust in police. The authors also find that perceiving police as procedurally just is positively related to trust. Importantly, this study finds a significant interaction effect between perceptions of police bias and procedural justice on Muslims' trust in police. Specifically, for those who hold the view that police are unbiased, perceiving police as generally procedural just has a strong positive effect on trust. For those who view police as biased against Muslims, procedural justice has a weak but positive effect on trust. This interaction effect suggests that perceived bias may shape how Muslims interpret police treatment of Muslims.

Originality/value

This study is the first to explore how perceived police bias and perceptions of procedural justice predict and interact to shape Muslims' trust in police, advancing existing procedural justice policing scholarship.

Details

Policing: An International Journal, vol. 44 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 April 2008

Chwan‐Yi Chiang, Su‐Chao Chang, Yu‐Wei Hsu and Yaw‐Bin Wang

The purpose of this paper is to emphasize that procedural justice has a contribution to parent‐subsidiary links within multinational enterprises (MNEs).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to emphasize that procedural justice has a contribution to parent‐subsidiary links within multinational enterprises (MNEs).

Design/methodology/approach

A mailed survey is adopted in this study. A total of 152 valid and complete questionnaires were returned from the respondents. Structural equation modeling and Chow test are used in this research paper.

Findings

Based on structural equation modeling, three significant dimensions of the parent‐subsidiary links are found to contribute to the financial performance of the subsidiaries (resource commitment, information flow, and control flexibility). Based on Chow test, these dimensions can lead to better financial performance under greater procedural justice in the decision‐making processes of MNEs.

Research limitations/implications

This study only collected information from Taiwanese multinational firms in East Asia and the Pacific countries, including China, Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Thailand and Vietnam. Generally, these regions are the emerging market, with structurally volatile but fast‐growing economies. In addition, further studies can extend the research to other countries. Environmental interferences, such as culture and legal rules, were not considered in this study.

Practical implications

In reality, although the due process is sometimes neglected because of time limitations or lack of patience, superior managers still should pay more attention to the processes of strategic decision making to keep the procedure fair and transparent.

Originality/value

This paper underlines the importance and value of the procedural justice in MNE management. The exercise of the procedural justice motivated subsidiary managers to aim for better financial performance with voluntary effort and their best ability.

Details

International Journal of Commerce and Management, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1056-9219

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 May 2014

Piyali Ghosh, Alka Rai and Apsha Sinha

The purpose of this paper is to explore whether perceptions of distributive, procedural and interactional justice are related to employee engagement, as an extension of…

8781

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore whether perceptions of distributive, procedural and interactional justice are related to employee engagement, as an extension of the antecedents-consequences model of Saks (2006), and to examine the possibility of inter-relationships between these three dimensions of justice.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey of 210 employees of public sector banks in India covered measures of job and organization engagement (OE) proposed by Saks (2006) and the scale on distributive, procedural and interactional justice developed by Niehoff and Moorman (1993). The relationships between justice perceptions and engagement were analysed using correlations and hierarchical regression analysis.

Findings

Results show that distributive, procedural and interactional are inter-related with each other. Further, distributive and interactional justice take precedence over procedural justice in determining job engagement, while distributive justice plays the most important role in determining OE, followed by procedural and interactional justice.

Practical implications

By highlighting the inter-relationships among the three dimensions of justice, this study offers useful insights into the underlying processes through which job and OE can be improved through these inter-relationships. Findings also highlight the application of concepts like relative deprivation in Indian public sector banks to increase the engagement levels of their employees.

Originality/value

This paper adds to the very small number of studies that have investigated the role of interactional justice in enhancing job and OEs. It has also established inter-relationships between the three dimensions of organizational justice and their individual roles in determining job and OEs.

Article
Publication date: 6 July 2010

Zhe Zhang and Ming Jia

The paper aims to extend research on public‐private partnerships (PPP) by exploring the path toward procedural justice and cooperation performance through contracts.

2012

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to extend research on public‐private partnerships (PPP) by exploring the path toward procedural justice and cooperation performance through contracts.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses equity theory to address inter‐partner cooperation in PPPs. The paper emphasizes how procedural fairness, as perceived by partners in a PPP, influences cooperation effects. Using both social exchange theory and transaction cost theory, it hypothesizes that procedural fairness improves cooperation effects by enhancing two kinds of contracts: the control‐formal contract and the informal contract.

Findings

The regression analysis suggests that procedural fairness indirectly affects three kinds of cooperation effects – direct effects, knowledge‐created effects, and social effects – by increasing formal and informal contracts.

Research limitations/implications

Further research might address the antecedents of procedural justice.

Practical implications

The paper suggests that procedural justice is important to PPPs and that contracts mediate this relationship.

Originality/value

The paper enriches PPP research, especially with regard to procedural formalization, contracts, and cooperation performance.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 25 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 August 2008

Julie Cloutier and Lars Vilhuber

The purpose of this research is to identify the dimensionality of the procedural justice construct and the criteria used by employees to assess procedural justice, in the…

4155

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to identify the dimensionality of the procedural justice construct and the criteria used by employees to assess procedural justice, in the context of salary determination.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a survey of 297 Canadian workers, the paper uses confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) to test the dimensionality and the discriminant and convergent validity of our procedural justice construct. Convergent and predictive validity are also tested using hierarchical linear regressions.

Findings

The paper shows the multidimensionality of the procedural justice construct: justice of the salary determination process is assessed through the perceived characteristics of allocation procedures, the perceived characteristics of decision‐makers, and system transparency.

Research limitations/implications

Results could be biased towards acceptance; this is discussed. The results also suggest possible extensions to the study.

Practical implications

Knowledge of the justice standards improves the ability of organizations to effectively manage the salary determination process and promote its acceptance among employees. Emphasizes the need to adequately manage the selection, training, and perception of decision makers.

Originality/value

The paper identifies the standards of procedural justice for salary determination processes. It contributes to the theoretical literature by providing a new multidimensional conceptualization, which helps to better understand the psychological process underlying the perception of procedural justice. The presence of a dimension associated with decision makers is novel and critical for compensation studies.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 23 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 8000