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Book part

Lan Guo, Bernard Wong-On-Wing and Gladie Lui

The present research examines the effect of incentivizing both outcome and driver measures of SPMS on middle managers' proactivity in influencing the strategy formulation…

Abstract

The present research examines the effect of incentivizing both outcome and driver measures of SPMS on middle managers' proactivity in influencing the strategy formulation process. A case-based experiment was conducted among 74 full-time employees. The results suggest that when incentives are linked to both outcome and driver measures of SPMS, compared with when they are outcome-based and not linked to the SPMS, managers are more proactive in communicating strategy-related issues to top management. In addition, this effect of SPMS-based incentives on middle managers' proactivity is mediated by their autonomous extrinsic motivation to achieve strategic goals. The results are in general consistent with postulates of the self-determination theory of motivation. This chapter also has practical implication. Specifically, recent evidence suggests that most SPMS adopters fail to validate causal business models underlying their formulated strategies (Ittner, 2008; Ittner & Larcker, 2003, 2005). Middle managers' proactive strategic behavior may be one means to prompt top management to inspect formulated strategies and their underlying business models.

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Book part

Lan Guo, Bernard Wong-On-Wing and Gladie Lui

We examine how input- (vs. output-) based performance evaluation and incentive intensity impact employees’ autonomous motivation, thereby influence their proactive work behaviors.

Abstract

Purpose

We examine how input- (vs. output-) based performance evaluation and incentive intensity impact employees’ autonomous motivation, thereby influence their proactive work behaviors.

Methodology

We collected survey responses from 309 employees of different firms. Multi-group Structural Equation Modeling analyses were used to analyze the data.

Findings

Input-based evaluation had a positive effect on autonomous motivation and proactive work behaviors when task uncertainty was high, but a negative effect when it was low. Autonomous motivation had a positive effect on proactive work behaviors.

Research implications

Our results on the moderating effect of task uncertainty provide insights into inconsistencies in earlier studies. Moreover, applying self-determination theory of motivation to incentive research can provide some insights into why sometimes, incentives can negatively affect performance.

Practical implications

The study of proactive work behaviors is important because despite their necessity in the fast-changing business environment, they are relatively unexplored in the incentive literature. Proactivity is especially important for tasks that are high in uncertainty because the exact tasks to achieve those goals are hard to specify.

Originality/value of paper

We investigate the effect of performance management system on proactive work behaviors, mediated by autonomous motivation and moderated by task uncertainty.

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Article

Xin-Hua Guan and Tzung-Cheng Huan

In an increasingly competitive market, tourism managers are aware of the importance of talent management. Because tour guide behavior has an important influence on…

Abstract

Purpose

In an increasingly competitive market, tourism managers are aware of the importance of talent management. Because tour guide behavior has an important influence on tourists’ experience in the process of group touring, how to motivate a tour guide’s proactive behavior becomes an important issue. Based on social exchange and cognitive theory, the purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of particular human resource management practices on proactive behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

This research takes the tour guide as the research object. The questionnaire survey method was used to obtain data. At last, 351 valid questionnaires were obtained. Finally, the hypotheses of this research are tested using structural equation modeling and percentile (bias-corrected percentile) bootstrapping method.

Findings

The results show that human resource management practices positively influenced proactive behavior of tour guides. Moreover, both perceived organizational support and self-efficacy were found to mediate the relationship between human resource management practice and proactive behavior.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the tourism literature by finding that both perceived organizational support and self-efficacy can foster the effect of human resource management practice, resulting in proactive behavior of tour guides.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 31 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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Article

Jeffrey A. Beck, JaeMin Cha, SeungHyun Kim and Bonnie Knutson

The objective of this study was to confirm the dimensions of revenue managers’ proactive work behavior in the lodging setting and to examine the effect of organizational…

Abstract

Purpose

The objective of this study was to confirm the dimensions of revenue managers’ proactive work behavior in the lodging setting and to examine the effect of organizational structure on the degree of proactivity in their work behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

The data (n = 280) collected from lodging revenue managers was analyzed, using exploratory factor analysis, confirmatory factor analyses and multivariate analysis of variance.

Findings

The four factor model was confirmed – Voice, Individual Innovation, Taking Charge and Problem Prevention. Revenue managers who manage multiple properties were found to have greater proactivity than their single property counterparts.

Research limitations/implications

A future study can work exclusively with individual companies to better understand the demographics of the Revenue Manager within specific organizations.

Originality/value

This study enhances our understanding of revenue management activities and behaviors by focusing on the concept of proactive work behaviors, and the complexity of responsibility that revenue managers face. This study is to exhibit a greater measure of proactive work behavior.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 26 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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Book part

Chia-Huei Wu, Sharon K. Parker and Uta K. Bindl

Scholars have argued that different forms of proactive behaviors (e.g., career initiative, feedback seeking, and taking charge) all involve employees’ self-initiated and…

Abstract

Scholars have argued that different forms of proactive behaviors (e.g., career initiative, feedback seeking, and taking charge) all involve employees’ self-initiated and future-focused efforts to bring about change in a situation (Parker et al., 2006). There are at least three important elements that define proactivity: future-focus, change-orientation, and self-initiation (Frese & Fay, 2001; Parker et al., 2006). First, proactive behavior is future-focused, which means that this action is targeted at anticipated problems or at opportunities with a long-term focus. Second, proactive behavior is change-oriented, involving not just reacting to a situation but being prepared to change that situation in order to bring about a different future. Third, and underpinning the prior two elements, proactive behavior is self-initiated, which means that employees initiate a proactive goal without being told to, or without requiring explicit instructions from supervisors. Accordingly, proactivity has also been conceived of as a process in which employees generate and implement, under their own direction, a proactive goal to bring about a different future (Bindl, Parker, Totterdell, & Hagger-Johnson, 2012; Frese & Fay, 2001; Grant & Ashford, 2008).

Details

Advances in Positive Organizational Psychology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-000-1

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Article

Dung Tien Luu

The present study aimed to investigate the relationship between employee perceived internal corporate social responsibility (CSR) practices and pharmaceutical firms'…

Abstract

Purpose

The present study aimed to investigate the relationship between employee perceived internal corporate social responsibility (CSR) practices and pharmaceutical firms' performance with the mediating role of employee intrapreneurial behaviour.

Design/methodology/approach

The study sample consisted of 607 employees at pharmaceutical firms in Ho Chi Minh City of Vietnam. The data was analysed by a structural equation modelling (SEM).

Findings

The results revealed that the model fitted well into the empirical data considering the goodness-of-fit measures. The estimates results revealed the significant total effects of employee perception of internal CSR practices on pharmaceutical firms' performances through the influencing mechanism of employee intrapreneurial behaviour.

Practical implications

Employee welfare is a fundamental factor for organisational performance. Ethical organisations might yield prosperity through innovation employee behaviour. Firms should build the structure and mechanism to implement internal CSR and support the commitment of intrapreneurship.

Originality/value

The study investigates how employees respond to internal CSR practices and contribute to firm performance through employee intrapreneurial behaviour.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 33 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Evolutionary Selection Processes
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-685-3

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Article

Ikhlas Abdalla and Awad Al-Zufairi

The purpose of this paper is to examine how leadership aspiration mediates the effect of career self-efficacy on employees' engagement in career self-management (CSM; i.e…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how leadership aspiration mediates the effect of career self-efficacy on employees' engagement in career self-management (CSM; i.e. deployment of career advancement strategies concerning access to power, psychological boundaryless and self-promotion), whether self-efficacy directly influences CSM, and whether these relations are conditional upon nationality (which is a proxy for domestic and international careers in Kuwait).

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire was completed by 615 highly educated young Kuwaitis and self-initiated expatriates (SIEs; Arab and South Asian nationals) working in Kuwait.

Findings

The results demonstrate that self-efficacy, directly and indirectly (mediated by leadership aspiration), influences the three types of career advancement strategies. Moderated-mediation analyses suggest that SIEs and Kuwaitis engage in similar CSM behaviors when it is motivated by self-efficacy, which is mediated by leadership aspiration. Also, self-efficacy has greater direct effect on SIEs' CSM than Kuwaitis', but Kuwaitis have higher tendency for CSM behavior.

Practical implications

Interventions aiming to improve employees' engagement in CSM may focus on enhancing their psychological capital and contexts, while minding the differential effects of nationality and self-efficacy on CSM of Kuwaitis and SIEs.

Originality/value

The study provides unique information about CSM utilizing understudied populations namely, Middle-Eastern and self-initiated expatriate employees. It confirms the effects of self-efficacy and leadership aspiration on CSM and reveals different effects of nationality depending on the motivators at play.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 25 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Book part

Amanda Pyman

This paper argues that creative compliance tactics are an innovative union renewal strategy. Creative compliance involves the observance of the letter of the law while…

Abstract

This paper argues that creative compliance tactics are an innovative union renewal strategy. Creative compliance involves the observance of the letter of the law while undermining its spirit. This regulatory inconsistency stems from indeterminate legal outcomes and discretion in legal interpretation and application. Drawing on interviews with senior union officials in four case studies in Australia, this paper reveals that two particular types of creative compliance tactics have been used by the unions to achieve positive outcomes: work-to-rule and the exploitation of loopholes. These opportunistic and proactive approaches to ‘anti-union’ legislation at the national level since 1997 represent a sea change in union tactics and a viable union renewal strategy, because they augment the individual ability of unions to shape and advance an agenda and therefore, adapt and transform at an organisational level. Consistent with adaptation theories on organisational-environment relations and strategic choice theory, the findings reinforce that unions ‘own’ strategic choices and that they can, in response to environmental scanning, adjust their tactics accordingly.

Details

Advances in Industrial & Labor Relations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-265-8

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Book part

Tanya Bondarouk, Eline Marsman and Marc Rekers

The goal of this chapter is to explore the requirements modern companies expect of HR professionals’ competences.

Abstract

Purpose

The goal of this chapter is to explore the requirements modern companies expect of HR professionals’ competences.

Design/Methodology/Approach

Departing from the widely acknowledged HR competence studies of Ulrich and associates, we extended them with the continuous learning competence profile and HR professionals’ individual job performance. The empirical study is built on open interviews with HR leaders of ten large Dutch companies.

Findings

The study offers a new set of HRM competences. This set includes six HRM profiles: Business Focus, Learning Focus, Strategic Focus, HR Technology, HR Delivery, and Personal Credibility. Several contingency factors are thought to play a role in supporting these HRM competences: company culture, strategy, size, sector, scope, and position of HR professionals.

Practical Implications

Based on these contributions, we recommended conducting a quantitative study to gain understanding of the relevance of the individual HRM job performance and to find associations between the HRM competences and the individual HRM job performance.

Originality/Value

The focus of this chapter is a combination of HRM competences and the individual job performance of HR professionals.

Details

Human Resource Management, Social Innovation and Technology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-130-5

Keywords

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