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Article
Publication date: 20 April 2012

Joohyung Park and Sejin Ha

This study aims to investigate the differences in underlying psychological aspects regarding pro‐environmental behaviors between two distinct consumer groups: green…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the differences in underlying psychological aspects regarding pro‐environmental behaviors between two distinct consumer groups: green product purchasers and green product non‐purchasers. Focusing on pro‐environmental behavior in recycling, it seeks to investigate these psychological aspects: cognitive attitude, affective attitude, social norm, personal norm, and behavioral intention.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a web‐based survey, a total of 363 responses from US consumers were used for the data analysis. Confirmatory factor analysis was conducted to check the measurement model, and a multiple regression and MANOVA were performed to test the proposed hypotheses.

Findings

Compared to green product non‐purchasers, green product purchasers exhibited significantly higher levels of cognitive attitude, affective attitude, social norm, personal norm, and recycling intention. Also cognitive attitude, social norm, and personal norm predicted recycling intention.

Research limitations/implications

The limitations of this study include the self‐reporting questionnaire and the measurement of consumers' recycling intention rather than their actual behavior.

Practical implications

This study will provide useful information to retailers who are developing product/service offerings and operation practices to address sustainable consumption.

Originality/value

This study provides empirical evidence that certain consumer groups in relation to pro‐environmental product shopping behavior (purchasers vs. non‐purchasers) exhibit differences in the psychological formation of another pro‐environmental behavior, recycling.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 40 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 13 March 2020

Farzana Quoquab, Jihad Mohammad and Ruzanna Shahrin

Though the concern over pro-environmental behavior is growing, there is a lack of a valid scale to measure pro-environmental behavior in nutricosmetics context…

Abstract

Purpose

Though the concern over pro-environmental behavior is growing, there is a lack of a valid scale to measure pro-environmental behavior in nutricosmetics context. Nutricosmetics products are believed to boost health and fitness and thus gained worldwide popularity. Many consumers in recent days are purchasing nutricosmetics products because of its positive impact toward human health and less harm toward the environment. However, to date, there is no valid instrument to measure this construct. To fill this gap in the existing literature, this study aims to develop a valid and reliable scale to measure pro-environmental behavior in nutricosmetics purchase (PEB-NP).

Design/methodology/approach

To develop and validate the PEB-NP scale, a sequential process is followed which includes item generation, item selection, item purification and item validation. Relevant literature was reviewed and qualitative interviews were carried out to generate the items. Next, experts’ opinion was sought to select the items. Two studies were conducted (N = 150, N = 448) to explore the factor structure and to validate the scale. Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) was used to purify the scale, whereas confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) using SmartPLS (version 3) was used to validate the scale.

Findings

Based on EFA output, 14 items were retained which were then validated using CFA. The results revealed that, PEB-NP is a hierarchical multi-dimensional construct. The dimensions are “environmental aesthetics,” “conservation behavior (reduce and recycle)” and “health consciousness.” The findings from CFA confirmed the EFA results and established that pro-environmental behavior is a third-order factor model in which conservation dimension is consisted of two sub-dimensions, namely, “reduce” and “recycle” behavior.

Practical implications

The newly developed scale will enable the marketers and policymakers to segment their consumers based on this scale to better strategize the marketing efforts in fulfilling their needs. Not only this, the PEB-NP scale will benefit marketers in understanding the behavioral pattern and purchase preference of the pro-environmental consumers with regard to the nutricosmetics consumption. This research also provides suggestions for future researchers in the pro-environmental behavior and nutricosmetics fields.

Originality/value

This study is a pioneer study to develop and validate the PEB scale in the context of nutricosmetics purchase.

Details

International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6123

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Article
Publication date: 3 October 2016

Naz Onel and Avinandan Mukherjee

Environmental behavior studies suggest that knowledge, in addition to other psychological and social factors, can play an important role in consumers’ environmental…

Abstract

Purpose

Environmental behavior studies suggest that knowledge, in addition to other psychological and social factors, can play an important role in consumers’ environmental behavior change. The purpose of this paper is to understand the relationship between knowledge and various psychological factors which encourage consumers’ participation in pro-environmental behaviors. The relationships that link an individual’s attitudes toward science, environmental values, different types of knowledge (i.e. scientific facts, environmental facts, and subjective environmental knowledge), environmental risk perception, and willingness to pay (WTP) for the environment with pro-environmental behavior were examined.

Design/methodology/approach

Theoretically guided hypotheses and model were formulated and tested with multiple linear regression models. The study was based on measures and data obtained from the large-sample secondary database of the 2010 General Social Survey (n=2,044).

Findings

Results indicated that while attitudes toward science had direct effects on knowledge of scientific facts and knowledge of environmental facts, environmental values showed effects on knowledge of environmental facts and subjective knowledge on environmental issues. The results also indicated that from different types of knowledge, subjective knowledge on environmental issues had effects on both environmental risk perception and WTP for the environment. Knowledge on environmental facts, on the other hand, was able to predict only environmental risk perception. The scientific factual knowledge did not show an effect on mediator of pro-environmental behavior. Also, subjective knowledge indicated indirect effects on pro-environmental behavior through environmental risk perception and WTP for the environment.

Originality/value

Although research on understanding factors influencing pro-environmental behaviors and potential relations to individual knowledge has grown in recent years, there has been very little attempt at distinguishing between different types of knowledge and investigating their potential roles in the context of environmentally relevant behaviors. This study will help understand the functioning of different types of consumer environmental knowledge and their impacts on pro-environmental behaviors more in depth.

Details

World Journal of Science, Technology and Sustainable Development, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-5945

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Article
Publication date: 14 August 2017

Audhesh Paswan, Francisco Guzmán and Jeffrey Lewin

This study aims to focus on people’s pro-environmental behavior and investigates its dimensions and determinants. As environmental sustainability attracts increased…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to focus on people’s pro-environmental behavior and investigates its dimensions and determinants. As environmental sustainability attracts increased scrutiny, understanding end consumerspro-environmental behavior becomes imperative for various stakeholders in our highly networked marketplace – e.g. policymakers, businesses, consumers, the public and society at large.

Design/methodology/approach

Using data from the general public in the USA, the hypothesized relationships are tested using structural equation modeling (SEM).

Findings

The results indicate that if people find enjoyment in nature, believe in achieving a balance between “mankind” and nature, and believe that the benefits of conservation activities are going to accrue in the near term (present), they are more likely to engage in pro-environmental behavior at all levels – supportive, active and lifestyle.

Research limitations/implications

Although only one aspect of environmental sustainability – environmental conservation – is analyzed, these findings support assertions set forth in the theory of environmentally significant behavior (Stern, 1999), the norm-activation theory of altruism (Schwartz, 1973), the theory of reasoned action (Fishbein, 1979) and the theory of planned behavior (Ajzen, 1985).

Practical implications

Messages about sustainability, environmental conservation and pro-environmental behavior should be framed using people’s fondness for and enjoyment of nature; should focus on present benefits of conservation; and should be targeted and differentiated for men, women and older people to encourage conservation behaviors among these differing demographic groups.

Originality/value

This study identifies three different levels of intensity of pro-environmental behavior – supportive, active and lifestyle – and empirically examines the relationships between these behavior types and the attitudinal antecedents revolving around time when the benefits of environmental conservation accrue, nature and human–nature interaction.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 34 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 26 October 2012

Katja Soyez

The purpose of this paper is to link national cultural values to personal pro‐environmental value orientations, in order to investigate why the salience of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to link national cultural values to personal pro‐environmental value orientations, in order to investigate why the salience of pro‐environmental value orientations differs cross‐culturally. A value‐based model is proposed and tested in a multinational study.

Design/methodology/approach

An empirical investigation of 1,096 consumers was conducted in five nations with a different cultural profile on the two cultural dimensions in‐group collectivism and assertiveness. The paper applies multi‐group structural equation modelling to test the moderating effect of culture on the impact of pro‐environmental values on attitudes and subjective norms.

Findings

The study reveals that the influence of a pro‐environmental value orientation differs substantially, according to national cultural values. While an ecocentric value orientation is important in the US, Canadian, German, and Australian samples which hold individualistic values, an anthropocentric value orientation is salient in the Russian sample, characterized by collectivistic values. The hypothesized influence of the national cultural value assertiveness, however, could not be established decisively.

Research limitations/implications

First, the present study considers culture as a national value on an aggregated level. Future studies should take into account cultural values at different levels of aggregation. Second, since only one collectivistic society is the object of the investigation, the results are limited in terms of generalizability.

Practical implications

In order to address the ecocentric value orientation in the analyzed individualistic societies, marketers should emphasize benefits for the environment in the USA, Canada, Australia, and Germany. By contrast, the positive consequences for humankind in general and future generations should be stressed in the collectivistic Russian sample.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the literature by integrating both individual and national perspectives on the value‐based drivers of environmental concern. The study also provides insight into pro‐environmental consumer behavior in an emerging market (namely Russia), which has so far been neglected in cross‐cultural research.

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Article
Publication date: 5 February 2020

Lei Wang, Philip Pong Weng Wong and Elangkovan Narayanan Alagas

Prior studies mostly investigated the relationship between the cognitive characteristics of individuals and their pro-environmentalism, addressing the need for green hotel…

Abstract

Purpose

Prior studies mostly investigated the relationship between the cognitive characteristics of individuals and their pro-environmentalism, addressing the need for green hotel operators to understand the different green purchase patterns of consumers. The problem is that, although consumers claim they are concerned about environmental issues, their purchasing behaviour does not translate, in practical terms, into actually booking green hotels. In other words, the connection between altruism, environmental knowledge and consumer visiting green hotel is fairly unexplored in the literature. This study aims to analyze the relationships of three types of altruism and two types of environmental knowledge with attitude and intention.

Design/methodology/approach

An integrated theoretical research model was used, based on the value–belief–norm theory of environmentalism. The collection of 248 questionnaires was followed by subsequent empirical testing of the proposed hypotheses, which was performed using SPSS and AMOS.

Findings

The resulting outcomes show a significant positive relationship between green purchase attitude and intention. Further, the biospheric, altruistic and collectivistic values, as well as subjective and objective knowledge were shown to positively influence attitude and intention towards green hotel selection, respectively.

Research limitations/implications

Because of the chosen online sampling method, the research results may lack generalizability. Therefore, researchers are encouraged to test the proposed propositions further.

Originality/value

This paper fulfils an identified need to study how visiting green hotel can be influenced by different types of altruism and environmental knowledge.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Mark Cleveland, Maria Kalamas and Michel Laroche

The purpose of this research was to examine the impact of various attitudes and personality characteristics on environmentally‐friendly behaviors, from a locus of control…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research was to examine the impact of various attitudes and personality characteristics on environmentally‐friendly behaviors, from a locus of control (LOC) perspective. Specifically, we developed and tested a model linking a related construct, environmental locus of control (ELOC), to a series of pro‐environmental behaviors.

Design/methodology/approach

The context related to various personal and household behaviors vis‐à‐vis the environment, and the subject pool consisted of a diverse group of urban consumers. A survey was employed to measure various attitudinal and personality variables corresponding to internal/external locus of control, as well as a battery of pro‐environmental behaviors. The research propositions were tested using a structural equation modeling approach.

Findings

We found four distinct dimensions of ELOC, two of which relate to an external LOC (“biospheric‐altruism” and “corporate skepticism”) and the other two relate to an internal LOC (“economic motivation” and “individual recycling efforts”). We then linked these four dimensions to a variety of pro‐environmental behaviors. Highly variable patterns were obtained, with different dimensions assuming a greater or lesser impact, or no role at all, depending on the specific behavior under analysis.

Research limitations/implications

Generalizability of the findings is limited due to the sample (urban consumers from one major city), and the method employed (validity of self‐report measures and the non‐experimental nature of the field study).

Practical implications

Our findings highlight the importance of considering the specificity of pro‐environmental behaviors, when assessing the antecedent roles of pro‐environmental attitudes/dispositions, which are in‐and‐of‐themselves, complex and multidimensional.

Originality/value

In this era of environmental degradation, researchers, managers, and public policy makers alike need to consider that pro‐environmental attitudes are composed of multiple dispositional facets, and that the role of these facets is highly context‐specific.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 14 November 2019

Heesup Han, Hyoungeun Moon and Sunghyup Sean Hyun

This paper aims to uncover the determining factors of customers’ pro-environmental intention for green hospitality products (green hotels and green restaurants) and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to uncover the determining factors of customers’ pro-environmental intention for green hospitality products (green hotels and green restaurants) and explore the comparative importance among the factors. This study also investigated the difference in forming pro-environmental intention across the green hospitality product types.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed-method approach was taken to achieve the research objectives. In a qualitative phase, the textual data collected via an open-ended question were analyzed using a unit of analysis and categorization method. In a quantitative phase, the psychometric measurement items were organized and validated through a series of tests. A structural equation modeling and structural invariance test were used to evaluate the hypothesized relationships and difference between green hotels and green restaurants.

Findings

The textual data yielded three additional factors underlying consumerspro-environmental consumption intention. Including five core variables derived from the extant theories in the pro-environmental behavior literature, eight variables were categorized into volitional, cognitive, emotional and moral dimensions. Among the dimensions, volitional and cognitive dimensions significantly contributed to consumerpro-environmental intention. The influence of pro-environmental attitude and perceived benefits on intention differed across green hotels and green restaurants.

Originality/value

This study uses a thorough mixed-method approach encompassing qualitative and quantitative processes and develops the psychometric items to explore the drivers of customers’ pro-environmental consumption intention for green hospitality products. This research is also one of the very few studies that verified the difference in customers’ pro-environmental behavior between green hotels and green restaurants.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 32 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 16 August 2013

Kavita Sharma and Monika Bansal

The paper attempts to investigate the term “environmental consciousness” and identify the underlying components of environmental consciousness and its antecedents. Also…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper attempts to investigate the term “environmental consciousness” and identify the underlying components of environmental consciousness and its antecedents. Also, to propose the framework explaining the linkage between environmental consciousness, its antecedents, components, and behavioral outcome, and also the variables, if any, that may intervene between environmental consciousness and environmentally conscious consumer behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reviews extant literature to bring conceptual clarity to the term environmental consciousness and its linkages with the related variables.

Findings

Environmental consciousness – a mental state variable – is found distinct from its antecedents and associated behaviors. It is a multi‐dimensional construct varying from low general level to high product‐specific level.

Research limitations/implications

This paper provides understanding for the term environmental consciousness and its relation with other variables and thus leaves the wide scope for research in the future.

Practical implications

The extent to which green marketing efforts can gainfully be taken to the market and given a required scale depends upon environmental consciousness of the consumers. According to levels of environmental consciousness, green consumer segments are obtained and “greener” consumer segments can be targeted to induce pro‐environmental purchase behavior.

Social implications

The proposed model in the study would allow the green marketers to support the whole idea of environment protection through appropriate marketing strategies.

Originality/value

Based on extant review of literature, the paper proposes the term environmental consciousness as a mental state variable, which is distinct from its antecedents and behavioural outcomes.

Details

Journal of Indian Business Research, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4195

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2008

Josephine Pickett‐Baker and Ritsuko Ozaki

The objective of this paper is to investigate if marketing and branding techniques can help establish green brands and introduce greener patterns of consumption into…

Abstract

Purpose

The objective of this paper is to investigate if marketing and branding techniques can help establish green brands and introduce greener patterns of consumption into contemporary lifestyles in the current context where environmentally friendly products are increasingly available.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reviews consumer behaviour and advertising to identify how consumers are persuaded to opt for greener products. It reports the results of a consumer product survey using a questionnaire based on the Dunlap and van Liere HEP‐NEP environmental survey and the Roper Starch Worldwide environmental behaviour survey. The respondents were 52 mothers who shop at supermarkets.

Findings

The results show a correlation between consumer confidence in the performance of green products and their pro‐environmental beliefs in general. The findings suggest that most consumers cannot easily identify greener products (apart from cleaning products) although they would favour products manufactured by greener companies, and they do not find the current product marketing particularly relevant or engaging.

Practical implications

The paper suggests that the market for greener products could be exploited more within consumer groups that have pro‐environmental values.

Originality/value

This paper identifies that consumers are not exposed enough to green product marketing communication and suggests the greater use of marketing and brands to promote and sell products that are environmentally friendly and function effectively.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 25 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

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