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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2013

Sylvie Guerrero, Julie Sylvestre and Doina Muresanu

The aim of this paper is to study the effects of pro‐diversity practices on perceived insider status, and explore the moderating role of leader‐member exchange in this…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to study the effects of pro‐diversity practices on perceived insider status, and explore the moderating role of leader‐member exchange in this relationship. The main and interactive effects on PIS are studied for cultural minority and majority groups.

Design/methodology/approach

Research hypotheses are tested with a questionnaire administered to 210 employees working in three Canadian organizations engaged in diversity management.

Findings

Results indicate that the main and interactive effects of organizational fairness and leader‐member exchange on perceived insider status are significant. The interactive effect on perceived insider status is higher for cultural minorities than for other employees.

Research limitations/implications

This study shows the importance of perceived insider status in the field of diversity, identifies organizational fairness and leader‐member exchange as two significant organizational antecedents to perceived insider status, and describes the mechanisms linking these antecedents to perceived insider status (the interaction effects).

Originality/value

The main contribution of the research resides in the identification of perceived insider status as a variable that deserves more attention in the field of diversity. The article invites future research to explore the behavioral consequences of perceived insider status in diverse teams, and to pursue the understanding of mechanisms leading to feelings of inclusion.

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 22 November 2019

Joanie Caron, Hugo Asselin, Jean-Michel Beaudoin and Doïna Muresanu

While companies in developed countries are increasingly turning to indigenous employees, integration measures have met with mixed results. Low integration can lead to…

Abstract

Purpose

While companies in developed countries are increasingly turning to indigenous employees, integration measures have met with mixed results. Low integration can lead to breach of the psychological contract, i.e. perceived mutual obligations between employee and employer. The purpose of this paper is to identify how leadership and organizational integration measures can be implemented to promote the perceived insider status (PIS) of indigenous employees, thereby fostering fulfillment of the psychological contract.

Design/methodology/approach

A search for relevant literature yielded 128 texts used to identify integration measures at the level of employee–supervisor relationships (leader-member exchanges, inclusive leadership) and at the level of employee–organization relationships (perceived organizational support, pro-diversity practices).

Findings

Measures related to leadership included recruiting qualified leaders, understanding cultural particularities, integrating diverse contributions and welcoming questions and challenges. Organizational measures included reaching a critical mass of indigenous employees, promoting equity and participation, developing skills, assigning meaningful tasks, maintaining good work relationships, facilitating work-life balance, providing employment security, fostering support from communities and monitoring practices.

Originality/value

While PIS has been studied in western and culturally diverse contexts, it has received less attention in indigenous contexts. Yet, some indigenous cultural values are incompatible with the basic assumptions of mainstream theories. Furthermore, colonial policies and capitalist development have severely impacted traditional indigenous economic systems. Consequently, indigenous people are facing many barriers to employment in ways that often differ from the experiences of other minority groups.

Details

Cross Cultural & Strategic Management, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5794

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Article
Publication date: 18 December 2019

Tipnuch Phungsoonthorn and Peerayuth Charoensukmongkol

The purpose of this paper is to examine some of the antecedents and outcomes associated with a sense of place (SOP) on the part of Myanmar migrant workers working in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine some of the antecedents and outcomes associated with a sense of place (SOP) on the part of Myanmar migrant workers working in Thailand toward their place of work. The transformational leadership of top management and diversity climate were selected as the antecedent variables, whereas turnover intention was selected as the outcome variable. Belongingness theory and social identity theory were used as the theoretical foundation to support the roles of these variables.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data were collected from Myanmar migrant workers working at two factories in Thailand (n=736). Partial least squares regression was used for the data analysis.

Findings

The results support a negative linkage between SOP and turnover intention. The positive contribution of transformational leadership of top management and diversity climate to SOP was also supported. Moreover, diversity climate was found to partially mediate the positive contribution of transformational leadership of top management to SOP. Finally, the analysis found that the linkage between diversity climate and SOP was positively moderated by the length of stay of the Myanmar migrant workers in the organization.

Originality/value

This study provides new evidence showing that SOP also matters for foreign migrant workers in terms of developing emotional attachment to the workplace outside their home country and that these workers were less likely to leave the workplace although they were a culturally minority group in the organization. This research also provides new evidence concerning the role of the transformational leadership of top management and workplace climate, which were antecedents of an SOP toward the organization.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 39 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

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Article
Publication date: 15 June 2021

Jie Huang and Liguo He

The purpose of this case study is to test a moderated mediation model linking employees' perceived HRM practices to organizational citizenship behaviours (OCB) with…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this case study is to test a moderated mediation model linking employees' perceived HRM practices to organizational citizenship behaviours (OCB) with perceived insider status as the mediator and emotional exhaustion as the moderator in a Chinese high-tech organization.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of 417 Chinese employees were recruited from a large Chinese high-tech company to participate in a paper-and-pencil survey, and mediation and moderation were analysed using PROCESS macro for SPSS.

Findings

Perceived insider status partially mediates the relationship between perceived HRM practices and OCB, and emotional exhaustion moderates the relationship between perceived insider status and OCB such that the strength of the relationship is stronger in employees with low emotional exhaustion levels than in employees with high emotional exhaustion levels.

Practical implications

There is a need for organizations to promote the physical and psychological well-being of its employees in order to maximize the effectiveness of HRM practices.

Originality/value

This case study provides novel insights into how employees' perceived HRM practices elicit OCB and its boundary conditions in collectivistic cultures.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2005

Graham Beaver and Kate Hutchings

The purpose of this paper is to examine the importance of strategic human resource development (HRD) in small and medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs) with specific reference…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the importance of strategic human resource development (HRD) in small and medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs) with specific reference to key issues around training, development and education as well as an emerging issue of significance, age diversity management.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach undertaken in the paper is to draw upon relevant literature and research as well as the authors' own analysis of the relationship between strategic human resource management (SHRM), HRD and SMEs based on prior research.

Findings

The findings of the research and analysis is that SMEs which take a strategic approach to training and development of their human resources will profit not only from a competitive position in their marketplace but also be well placed to adjust to changing and often uncertain external influences on the business environment presented to organisations in the twenty‐first century.

Practical implications

It is envisaged that SMEs should make changes to their current practices and adopt a more strategic approach to the development of their people based on the practical implications outlined within the paper as to how organisations can implement HRD practices linked to broader corporate strategy.

Originality/value

The paper adds value in broadening the existing focus of SHRM and HRD on large corporations to engendering the need to also develop good HRD practices within emerging and growing SMEs and recognising the important role that they can play in developing an age diverse workforce.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 47 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 13 February 2017

Jesper Verheij, Sandra Groeneveld and Lisette Kuyper

This purpose of this paper is to examine whether and how different diversity approaches of public, semi-public and private sector organizations affect negative treatment…

Abstract

Purpose

This purpose of this paper is to examine whether and how different diversity approaches of public, semi-public and private sector organizations affect negative treatment experienced in the workplace. Broadly speaking, organizations might either approach diversity as a problem of inequality or as a resource and an added value for the organization. As such, a pro-equality and a pro-diversity approach can be distinguished which are both examined in this paper.

Design/methodology/approach

In a quantitative study, structural equation modeling was used on survey data of a representative sample of Dutch employees.

Findings

Results show that while both approaches are negatively associated with negative treatment, the pro-diversity is most strongly so. Sector differences were less pronounced than expected, although employees across different sectors of employment benefit from both the approaches to a different extent.

Research limitations/implications

Further research examining the effect of diversity approaches to negative treatment across sectors is required. Suggestions for further research are discussed.

Practical implications

Looking at sector differences, the findings showed that employees across public, semi-public and private sector organizations benefitted from the diversity approaches to a different extent. Organizations across different sectors are therefore suggested to adopt different diversity approaches to combat negative treatment in the workplace.

Originality/value

Most studies either focus on a pro-equality or pro-diversity approach. The present study combines both and, moreover, pays attention to the way both approaches affect negative treatment experienced in the semi-public sector. Examining variation within the public sector is unique in the context of diversity research.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 36 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

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Article
Publication date: 27 October 2020

Erin Oldford, Saif Ullah and Ashrafee Tanvir Hossain

The objective of this paper is to leverage a two-sided view of social capital to develop a model of board gender diversity and firm performance using social capital data…

Abstract

Purpose

The objective of this paper is to leverage a two-sided view of social capital to develop a model of board gender diversity and firm performance using social capital data from Northeast Regional Center of Rural Development.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors examine a large sample of 2,322 US publicly listed firms over the period 1996 to 2009. The final sample consists of 14,634 firm-year observations.

Findings

The authors find that when a firm's social network is not supportive of gender diversity, corporate boards have lower levels of female representation. The strength of a social network's social ties exacerbates the relationship between social capital and board gender diversity. The authors also report a negative relationship between female board membership and firm performance in social networks that are not pro-diversity. Robustness tests reveal that the authors’ social capital view of board diversity also applies to board ethnic diversity.

Research limitations/implications

This study focuses primarily on blue chip firms due to data constraints. It will be interesting for future researchers to investigate a broader spectrum of firms from a broader perspective of diversity beyond the study’s gender and ethnicity findings. Furthermore, this study assesses the US context, and future research could investigate firm sociability in other national contexts.

Practical implications

This study contributes new insights to the discourse on gender diversity on corporate boards which stand to inform both policy and practice. The results of the study can inform the position of an industry association on board gender diversity, with guidance on how messaging across networks can be more effective should it account for the hidden bias that the authors uncover in the current study. From a manager's perspective, this study can help those managers and boards trying to enhance board gender diversity by providing a more complete understanding of the factors that can limit progress.

Originality/value

This study contributes a social capital view of board gender diversity to the growing literature of corporate governance, board diversity and local environmental influences on corporate policies.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 47 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 September 2017

Francis Kasekende

The purpose of this paper is to examine the mediation effect of employee engagement on the relationship between employer obligations, employee obligations and state of the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the mediation effect of employee engagement on the relationship between employer obligations, employee obligations and state of the psychological contract and employee discretionary behaviours.

Design/methodology/approach

The empirical data were collected using self-administered questionnaires with 278 participants from 11 commissions and three agencies in the public service in Uganda. The authors used hierarchical regression analysis to investigate the hypotheses.

Findings

The results indicate that employer obligations, employee obligations and state of the psychological contract were positively related to employee discretionary behaviours. In addition, employee engagement was found to be a partial mediator between employee obligations, employer obligations and state of the psychological contract and discretionary behaviours among for both subordinate and supervisory staffs.

Originality/value

Since little is known about the process by which public service commissions and agencies in Uganda promote employer obligations, employee obligations and state of the psychological contract on discretionary behaviours, this paper contributes to the literature by examining human resource management practices in a developing country context.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 66 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 August 2017

Francis Kasekende

The purpose of this paper is to examine the interaction effects of leader-member exchange (LMX) dimensions and how they blend to affect psychological contract in the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the interaction effects of leader-member exchange (LMX) dimensions and how they blend to affect psychological contract in the public service in Uganda.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors employ the structural equation model to test a conditional hypothesis.

Findings

It is indicated that the magnitude of effect of affect and professional respect on psychological contract is dependent upon perceived contribution, implying that the predictive power of affect and professional respect on psychological contract increases considerably when perceived contribution increases.

Research limitations/implications

Only a single-research methodological approach was employed. So, future research through interviews could be undertaken to triangulate the results. Furthermore, future research should be undertaken to examine the multiplicative effects studied in this paper across time.

Practical implications

In order to increase the perceptions of fulfillment of the psychological contract in the public service in Uganda, managers should always endeavor to identify a viable LMX mix that can add value to expectations that employee and employer have of each other.

Originality/value

This is the first study that focuses on testing the interactive effect of LMX dimensions on psychological contract in Uganda’s public service.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 36 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 10 January 2018

Michael Crowhurst and Julie Faulkner

From one Graduate Diploma Secondary student taking a pro-diversity course that both authors had a connection with there was a very angry response, encapsulated by the…

Abstract

Purpose

From one Graduate Diploma Secondary student taking a pro-diversity course that both authors had a connection with there was a very angry response, encapsulated by the statement “This course made me feel guilty to be an Australian”. We are aware that negative student evaluations can be part of the territory for tertiary teachers working in diversity courses. The purpose of this paper is to explore the students’ confronting comment which will be construed as a type of offer that is being extended to us – an offer that we are refusing. We draw on Deleuze and Guattari’s notion of “exterior assemblages”, and we shift our gaze to consider “what constitutes the territory” that is our response to the pre-service teacher’s evaluative claim.

Design/methodology/approach

The specific methods we deployed involved an eclectic appropriation of various tools. We embarked on this process of exploration by journaling, collective reflection and informal discussions with other colleagues. Our journals responded to the question: What constitutes the place that is the territory that is our refusal of the student’s offer? In order to explore this place we: kept a hand-written journal; used conventional text and arts based practice techniques in our journaling; discussed our journal entries periodically (face to face, via Skype and via e-mail); discussed this project with colleagues – giving them knowledge that we were doing this – and that we might write journal entries about these conversations; and read a variety of relevant texts We engaged in these processes for a three month period. At the end of this period we shared journals, and set about the task of analysing them. We engaged in a number of analyses and detailed our findings over the next month. Further, over a longer period of time we engaged with this incident and our journal entries and presented a series of in progress papers at a variety of conferences and seminars. The analysis of the data generated involved discourse analysis and dialogue.

Findings

A series of key discourses were identified and listed in the paper.

Research limitations/implications

The key identified ideas are briefly linked to a series of implications for practitioners.

Practical implications

One of the key practical implications is the suggestion that where disagreements surface in education that one response to such moments might be for the parties to consider where they are located.

Social implications

The paper outlines a way of thinking about disagreements that has useful implications when considering issues relating to pedagogical strategies aiming to work towards social justice.

Originality/value

The paper is an original response to a critical moment that occurred for two lecturers in pre-service teacher education.

Details

Qualitative Research Journal, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1443-9883

Keywords

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