Search results

1 – 10 of over 99000
Click here to view access options
Book part
Publication date: 28 June 2016

Jan van Helden and Christoph Reichard

An examination of the commonalities and differences between performance management practices in the public and private sector.

Abstract

Purpose

An examination of the commonalities and differences between performance management practices in the public and private sector.

Methodology/approach

A literature review of 100 publications in international academic journals over the last 20 years.

Findings

The chapter develops a framework which links the dimensions of the public/private-distinction (ownership, funding, control and type of goals) to the design and use of performance management systems (PMS). This framework subsequently informs a literature review, which can be summarised as follows: Multi-dimensionality of the PMS is core in both public and private sector organisations, but quite many private sector papers point to a financial focus at the top of the PMS, while public sector organisations show a broad variety of performance indicators, including those on societally relevant goals. In addition, a link between the PMS and strategies can be found in the public and the private sector, but the match between different strategies and PMS design is more elaborated in the private sector. These findings are largely in accordance with our expectations. The review also finds support for the assumption that performance information in public sector organisations is primarily used for external accountability reasons, while internal managerial control is the main purpose in private firms. The use of performance information is quite intensive and mostly functional in both sectors, which does not meet our expectations. Overall, the differences between performance management practices in the public and private sector are less stringent than expected.

Research limitations

Due to limited evidence about the importance of performance-related pay systems and no evidence about targeting in both sectors, a more focused literature review on these issues would be desirable.

Practical implications

Mutual learning between both sectors, for example the public sector can learn from the private sector on how to link strategy to the PMS and the private sector can learn from the public sector about serving a multitude of stakeholders in the PMS.

Originality/value

A comprehensive review of performance management practices in the public and private sector.

Details

Performance Measurement and Management Control: Contemporary Issues
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-915-2

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 15 June 2020

Asya Cooley

This research paper comparatively reviews online accountability practices in public, private and nonprofit organizations, using the hospital industry as a case of analysis.

Abstract

Purpose

This research paper comparatively reviews online accountability practices in public, private and nonprofit organizations, using the hospital industry as a case of analysis.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted a quantitative content analysis of 240 US hospital websites, sampled from the 2016 American Hospital Association (AHA) database. Online Accountability Practices (OAP) instrument was utilized, and it included five dimensions as follows: accessibility, engagement, performance, governance and mission.

Findings

There were statistically significant differences in online accountability practices among the three sectors. Nonprofit organizations were leading the way in their overall online accountability practices. They were more likely to score higher on engagement, performance and mission dimensions. We explain this finding through the prism of multiple accountabilities, guided by the stakeholder theory. Private organizations had the lowest scores on every online accountability dimension, except for accessibility. Consistent with previous literature, private organizations were more likely to make information accessible in the online sphere, but not necessarily meaningful or reliable for evaluating organizational performance. Public organizations had the strongest scores within the governance dimension, placing importance on disclosing organizational leadership and sharing information on their governance structures.

Research limitations/implications

This project contributes to theory building on accountability in the online environment. It argues that the distinction between two forms of accountability (functional and holistic) is applicable in the online environment, while accessibility and performance dimensions of online accountability closely align with the functional (hierarchical) form of accountability, and a more holistic approach to accountability includes dimensions like engagement, governance and mission. In addition, this project is the first of its kind to apply the stakeholder theory to accountability practices in three sectors of the economy and how the stakeholder theory provides guidance as a basis of understanding the forms of accountability (functional and holistic) that are most likely aligned with organizations in three sectors of the economy.

Practical implications

The results of this study point to a number of implications for hospital patients, families, hospital administration, healthcare professionals and policymakers. These implications can be broadly divided into two groups as follows: policy implications and management implications. Policy implications pertain to the national dialog and interorganizational deliberations of sector-wide policy to enrich accountability practices; while management implications are concerned with local, intraorganizational discussions among administrators and organizational leaders on formulating specific strategies and tactics.

Originality/value

This research paper contributes to empirical studies on organizational accountability in the online environment. It enriches our understanding of how organizations in different sectors present themselves to the public.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 33 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 26 October 2010

Deepak Chawla and Himanshu Joshi

There is no single way of achieving business success. The concept of knowledge management (KM) builds on the existing management practices, integrating them into a

Downloads
3974

Abstract

Purpose

There is no single way of achieving business success. The concept of knowledge management (KM) builds on the existing management practices, integrating them into a philosophy for improving performance. This paper aims to understand the various dimensions of KM and how they differ in public and private sector organizations in India. It also attempts to identify the dimensions where one sector is better than the other and areas needing improvement.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses a sample comprising 16 private and public sector organizations. A convenient sampling scheme was used. The extent of KM practices was evaluated with respect to dimensions, namely process, leadership, technology, culture and measurement.

Findings

The paper empirically shows that private sector organizations fare better statistically on all dimensions compared to public sector organizations. Although the private sector is ahead of the public sector on the raw mean scores of various dimensions, it has still a long way to go as the scores are below four on a scale of five. The scores are just satisfactory and there is further scope for improvement.

Research limitations/implications

The study uses a sample of four public sector organizations and the findings may lack generalization. Therefore, it would be interesting to verify the findings using a larger sample size.

Practical implications

The paper can serve as a best practice document for public and private sector organizations interested in adopting KM for improving performance.

Originality/value

The paper tries to bring forth concern areas for KM in Indian public and private sector organizations.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 14 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 20 February 2009

Claudine Kearney, Robert D. Hisrich and Frank Roche

While the term “entrepreneurship” is not exclusively a private sector phenomenon, it is usually associated with private sector business activity and more specifically with…

Downloads
6180

Abstract

Purpose

While the term “entrepreneurship” is not exclusively a private sector phenomenon, it is usually associated with private sector business activity and more specifically with small to medium enterprises. However, over the last two decades it has appeared in the public administration literature with increasing frequency. The recent research in public sector entrepreneurial activity makes an exploratory comparative analysis of the key components that are applicable from private sector entrepreneurship timely as the topic is emerging as an area of academic inquiry and research. The purpose of this paper is to provide a comparative analysis of private and public sector entrepreneurship using an analytical model from private and public sector entrepreneurship.

Design/methodology/approach

A clear understanding of the research issues involved requires an appreciation of the nexus between private sector entrepreneurship and the more limited research field of public sector entrepreneurship. The paper identifies and examines the historical and evolutionary research on entrepreneurship as a basis for analysis of public and private sector entrepreneurship.

Findings

The paper provides a comprehensive analysis that highlights key similarities, differences or a combination between public and private sector entrepreneurship and develops an existing model and framework for a systematic approach to the public sector entrepreneurial process.

Originality/ value

Based on this exploration, new insights about public sector entrepreneurship are developed, practical implications for public sector entrepreneurs on how to approach public sector entrepreneurship more systematically and effectively are presented and opportunities for further research are identified.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 21 January 2022

Fayçal Boukamcha

The purpose of this paper is to shed light on the motivational process that leads to commitment development in the private and public sectors. It has been suggested that…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to shed light on the motivational process that leads to commitment development in the private and public sectors. It has been suggested that employee’s commitment is mainly predicted by job satisfaction and motivational factors such as internal communication, training, structural empowerment, incentive systems, transformational leadership and person–organization fit.

Design/methodology/approach

A comparative approach, between a set of private and public organizations, was undertaken. A survey was conducted on two random samples of workers belonging to both types of organizations.

Findings

The findings report a set of similarities and discrepancies between the private and the public organizations in terms of motivational factors that lead to job satisfaction and employees’ commitment.

Originality/value

This research brings additional value to the comparative literature on organizational analysis. It is one of the scarce comparative research in the North African context that deal with motivational factors at private and public workplaces.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 28 October 2021

Ana Yetano and Daniela Sorrentino

This paper aims to explore the financial and non-financial accountability disclosure patterns of state-owned enterprises (SOEs), as hybrid organizations.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the financial and non-financial accountability disclosure patterns of state-owned enterprises (SOEs), as hybrid organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

Adopting the hybridity concept and resorting to stakeholder theory, this paper works on a comparison between the accountability disclosure patterns of hybrid and private organizations operating in the same industry. European national news agencies are selected as units of analysis and an extensive web content analysis is performed on three categories of information.

Findings

SOEs are found to disclose a broader spectrum of information than private organizations, and differences between them have been found. Nevertheless, both financial and non-financial disclosures are underdeveloped in the two organizational types.

Research limitations/implications

This paper illustrates how hybridity explains SOEs’ accountability disclosure patterns. Results could not be complemented through information on disclosure through alternative channels. Future studies are encouraged to perform simultaneous comparisons among hybrid, public and private organizations, as well as considering industry specifics.

Practical implications

As web accountability disclosure helps to address the demands of distant stakeholders, efforts are needed to enhance SOEs’ web accountability disclosures and not to undermine democratic accountability relationships.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the ongoing debate on the accountability mechanisms and style of SOEs. Using a framework for hybrid organizations provides an understanding of how SOEs, as hybrid organizations, disclose information for accountability. In turn, this allows, and then promotes, the investigation of social phenomena by conceiving hybridity as a standalone institutional space.

Details

Meditari Accountancy Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-372X

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 10 August 2021

Tom A.E. Aben, Wendy van der Valk, Jens K. Roehrich and Kostas Selviaridis

Inter-organisational governance is an important enabler for information processing, particularly in relationships undergoing digital transformation (DT) where partners…

Downloads
1271

Abstract

Purpose

Inter-organisational governance is an important enabler for information processing, particularly in relationships undergoing digital transformation (DT) where partners depend on each other for information in decision-making. Based on information processing theory (IPT), the authors theoretically and empirically investigate how governance mechanisms address information asymmetry (uncertainty and equivocality) arising in capturing, sharing and interpreting information generated by digital technologies.

Design/methodology/approach

IPT is applied to four cases of public–private relationships in the Dutch infrastructure sector that aim to enhance the quantity and quality of information-based decision-making by implementing digital technologies. The investigated relationships are characterised by differing degrees and types of information uncertainty and equivocality. The authors build on rich data sets including archival data, observations, contract documents and interviews.

Findings

Addressing information uncertainty requires invoking contractual control and coordination. Contract clauses should be precise and incentive schemes functional in terms of information requirements. Information equivocality is best addressed by using relational governance. Identifying information requirements and reducing information uncertainty are a prerequisite for the transformation activities that organisations perform to reduce information equivocality.

Practical implications

The study offers insights into the roles of both governance mechanisms in managing information asymmetry in public–private relationships. The study uncovers key activities for gathering, sharing and transforming information when using digital technologies.

Originality/value

This study draws on IPT to study public–private relationships undergoing DT. The study links contractual control and coordination as well as relational governance mechanisms to information-processing activities that organisations deploy to reduce information uncertainty and equivocality.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 41 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 16 March 2021

Tomi Rajala and Petra Kokko

This study examines unexplored horizontal accountability types between public, private and third sector actors within a hybrid organization. The case organization was…

Abstract

Purpose

This study examines unexplored horizontal accountability types between public, private and third sector actors within a hybrid organization. The case organization was applying a novel alliance model to generate service paths for heterogeneous clientele consuming cultural, educational, health and social services. It was first to do so in Finland.

Design/methodology/approach

This research is on a case study that used documents and interviews to examine the design of the horizontal accountability. The descriptive analysis focused on identifying what type of formal accountability system was designed (i.e. who is the account holder, and who is accountable and for what and why).

Findings

An imbalanced accountability system was identified because accountability obligations were unevenly distributed between public, private and third sector actors. The private sector was the most accountable for performance, and the third sector (i.e. voluntary sector) was the least accountable. As account holders, the public, private and third sector actors were judging their conduct as account providers. This created a biased horizontal accountability system. The hybrid's accountability system was dynamic because the contracts made to establish the hybrid included opportunities to change horizontal accountability if future changes to the external environment affect too drastically the potential to achieve the hybrid's goals.

Originality/value

Three new concepts are proposed for studying dysfunctional accountability systems: dynamic, biased and horizontally imbalanced accountability.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 30 September 2014

Hee Jun Choi and Ji-Hye Park

The purpose of this paper is to examine the results of an empirical exploration of the relationship between learning transfer climates and organizational innovation…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the results of an empirical exploration of the relationship between learning transfer climates and organizational innovation. Additionally, factors associated with learning transfer climate that could account for innovation in Korean public and private organizations have been explored.

Design/methodology/approach

This study relies on quantitative data obtained from two survey questionnaires. The sample consists of 390 employees working for seven private and five public organizations; further, each employee has completed at least one training program within a one-year period.

Findings

Results of the study demonstrate that private, rather than public organizations, have significantly higher mean scores for all five learning transfer climate variables and for perceived organizational innovation. The results of multiple regression analyses reveal that openness to change and performance coaching have common and significant impacts on perceived innovation in both private and public organizations. However, the other three variables (i.e., transfer effort-performance expectations, performance-outcomes expectations, and performance self-efficacy) have varied effects on perceived innovation depending on organizational type. Specifically, transfer effort-performance expectations has a relatively meaningful impact on perceived innovation in public organizations. Performance-outcomes expectations and performance self-efficacy have relatively meaningful effects on perceived innovation in private organizations.

Research limitations/implications

The sample for this study consists of employees solely from Korean organizations. Therefore, further studies encompassing a greater sampling variety are required to determine the generalizability of these results. In addition, this study is limited to an investigation of the possible differences between public and private organizations with respect to their learning transfer climates and innovation. In studies to follow, researchers can further investigate these relationships in segmented organizations.

Originality/value

The results of this study will assist human resource practitioners to promote innovation effectively and efficiently based on organizational type.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 35 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 1 February 2004

Jacob K. Eskildsen, Kai Kristensen and Hans Jørn Juhl

This paper analyses the differences between private and public sector organisations in Denmark in relation to the penetration of holistic management models, how companies…

Downloads
5228

Abstract

This paper analyses the differences between private and public sector organisations in Denmark in relation to the penetration of holistic management models, how companies achieve excellent results and the empirical weight structure of the European Foundation for Quality Management (EFQM) excellence model. The results show that the penetration of holistic management models is greater among public organisations. Furthermore private and public organisations do not achieve excellent results in the same way. Private companies put higher emphasis on the systems dimension whereas public organisations put higher emphasis on the people dimension. In relation to the empirical weight structure of the EFQM excellence model two significant differences were found. Private companies put higher emphasis on the criteria “leadership” and “policy and strategy” than public organisations.

Details

The TQM Magazine, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-478X

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 99000