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Article
Publication date: 6 June 2019

Glenn Costin, Akari Nakai Kidd, Timothy Simon and David John Edwards

Framed as a pilot study, the purpose of this paper is to study the perceived appropriateness of an existing collaborative procurement procedure (CPP) framework from the…

Abstract

Purpose

Framed as a pilot study, the purpose of this paper is to study the perceived appropriateness of an existing collaborative procurement procedure (CPP) framework from the housebuilder’s perspective, seeking to improve its utility and stimulate further exploration.

Design/methodology/approach

Informed by an existing CPP framework and conducted by a UK-based development professional, four in-depth semi-structured interviews were undertaken with senior housebuilding practitioners from London and surrounding counties. A qualitative analysis was then conducted for this sociological study.

Findings

Perceived appropriateness of the framework was high; however, a number of procedural improvements were identified, along with limitations. Future studies are recommended including the influence upon project performance of groundworker integration at the design stage.

Research limitations/implications

Limited to four interviews from one regional area, the study provides an initial insight into the appropriateness of an existing CPP framework. Insights into why CP uptake is marginal within housebuilding were also gained. The research purpose was achieved but by offering a self-reflection upon practice (vis-à-vis wider generalisations), the findings provide a springboard for further studies.

Practical implications

The research identifies with current practice, industry perceptions and paths towards improving the utility of the CPP framework.

Social implications

This study offers insights into the perceptions of private housebuilding practitioners of their own practices and the factors they find challenging within the social constructs of their industry.

Originality/value

This research constitutes one of the first studies in the UK to examine the CPP framework from the perspective of the private housebuilder and is undertaken with the express purpose of furthering that framework’s utility.

Details

International Journal of Building Pathology and Adaptation, vol. 37 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-4708

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 August 2020

Nigel Craig, Nick Pilcher, Rebecca MacKenzie and Chris Boothman

The UK private housebuilding sector is the key supplier of new-build homes for customers, constituting a fifth of the entire UK construction industry. Yet, despite the…

Abstract

Purpose

The UK private housebuilding sector is the key supplier of new-build homes for customers, constituting a fifth of the entire UK construction industry. Yet, despite the high average cost of houses, and official reports advocating improvement, the sector remains blighted by criticism and a negative image of its quality. However, social media now offers customers new sources of advice and information. In this context, the purpose of this paper is to analyse social media forum posts from new-build homebuyers to reveal perceptions of the industry and illustrate the value of such data for others.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents and thematically analyses 147 comment posts from nine online Facebook forums under the themes of safety; standards; quality; workmanship; customer service; finance and money; advice; National House Building Council; ombudsman; and page closures.

Findings

Customers express frustration, anger, feelings of neglect and of an abdication of responsibility by the sector. Fundamentally, change is suggested at a systemic level, and it is urged this occurs through powerful and independent bodies.

Originality/value

To date, social media data has not been analysed in the context of the housebuilding sector. Yet, such data is key not only for its open and wide-reaching nature but also because it can be incorporated into government reports. It is hoped such data will be used by the new home ombudsman the UK Government hopes to establish in 2020 and help rectify many of the performance issues experienced and protect homebuyers.

Details

International Journal of Housing Markets and Analysis, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8270

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1980

Laurence Copeland

This article stresses the importance of investment to the firm and the economy. The author argues that the level of investment is largely determined by the balance between…

Abstract

This article stresses the importance of investment to the firm and the economy. The author argues that the level of investment is largely determined by the balance between the expected rate of return and the cost of capital.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

Content available
Article
Publication date: 15 June 2021

Richard Reed

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Abstract

Details

International Journal of Housing Markets and Analysis, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8270

Article
Publication date: 20 October 2020

Peter Jones and Daphne Comfort

The sustainable development goals (SDGs) agreed at a United Nations General Assembly in 2015 embrace an ambitious and wide ranging set of global environmental, social and…

Abstract

Purpose

The sustainable development goals (SDGs) agreed at a United Nations General Assembly in 2015 embrace an ambitious and wide ranging set of global environmental, social and economic issues designed to effect a transition to a more sustainable future. The United Nations called on all governments to pursue these ambitious goals but also acknowledged the important role of the private sector in addressing the SDGs. This paper offers an exploratory review of how some of the UK's largest volume housebuilders publicly claim to be committed to addressing the SDGs.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper provides an outline of the characteristics of sustainable development, of the SDGs and of the frame of reference and method of enquiry employed in the study, prior to reviewing the findings from the largest UK housebuilders.

Findings

The findings revealed that seven of the largest housebuilding companies claimed to be committed to contributing to the SDGs, though the scale and the extent of their claimed commitments varied. In reviewing the housebuilders approach to the SDGs, the authors drew attention to three challenges the housebuilders may face in pursuing their claimed commitment to the SDGs, namely, concentrating on specific goals, measurement and reporting.

Originality/value

The paper offers an accessible review of how seven of the UK's largest housebuilders claimed to be committed to addressing the SDGs.

Details

Property Management, vol. 39 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 June 2019

Antonia Layard

This paper aims to analyse the extent to which privatising – or denationalising land – has legal and policy effects.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to analyse the extent to which privatising – or denationalising land – has legal and policy effects.

Design/methodology/approach

It applies the law in context scholarship to the question of land privatisation.

Findings

Of all the recent privatisations in England, the most valuable, and yet least recorded, is of land. According to one estimate, two million hectares or 10 per cent of the Britain landmass, left the public sector for private ownership between 1979 and 2018. Privatisations include land that is sold, leased or where a public body changes its status. This paper aims to explore these privatisations, considering them as denationalisations, concluding that the effects are most significant in housing where the differences between social and private renting in relation to rents, the security of tenure and housing quality are striking. Moreover, although other public law restraints on the state-owned property are often limited, they are also still significant, facilitating scrutiny, particularly in combination with the public sector equality duty or site-specific duties for libraries, allotments or playing fields. All the sites disposed of to private developers, landlords and companies have lost these protections.

Originality/value

This is the first time this question has been considered in this way from a legal perspective.

Details

Journal of Property, Planning and Environmental Law, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9407

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 November 2020

Wolfgang Grenzfurtner and Manfred Gronalt

This paper aims to identify those factors, which will improve the collaboration between industrialised housebuilding (IHB) companies and their subcontractors within…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to identify those factors, which will improve the collaboration between industrialised housebuilding (IHB) companies and their subcontractors within continuous improvement (CI) programmes. These factors will enhance the supply chain (SC) efficiency and productivity, eliminating obstacles when designing, implementing and managing CI programmes within IHB SC.

Design/methodology/approach

An explorative case study with a mixed-method approach was conducted within an IHB SC. To collect data, participant observation and guided interviews were applied. A stakeholder analysis was conducted to structure their guiding principles. A causal loop diagram (CLD) analysis was used to model the effects on and relationships within a SC and their impact on the involvement of subcontractors.

Findings

The influences on the stakeholders and the guidelines under which they work are defined. Potential conflicts of interest between stakeholders are identified. A CLD is used to model a better understanding of system behaviour impacting on the relationships within the SC and on subcontractor involvement. The results provide a number of factors that need to be considered when designing, implementing and managing a CI programme.

Research limitations/implications

The research suggests better ways to use subcontractors’ specific knowledge of on-site processes such that productivity and efficiency are enhanced. Improvements within the construction supply chain (CSC) will, in the future, not be limited to small improvement gains at company level.

Originality/value

This paper extends the body of knowledge in CSC management by revealing factors important for designing, implementing and managing CI programmes, which enables the successful involvement of subcontractors in CI on SC level.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 March 2022

Adekunle Sabitu Oyegoke, Saheed Ajayi, Muhammad Azeem Abbas and Stephen Ogunlana

The problem of long delay and waiting time in Disabled Facilities Grants (DFG) housing adaptation has been ongoing for years. This study aimed at constructing an…

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Abstract

Purpose

The problem of long delay and waiting time in Disabled Facilities Grants (DFG) housing adaptation has been ongoing for years. This study aimed at constructing an innovative smart solution to streamline the housing adaptation process to prevent lengthy delays for disabled and elderly people.

Design/methodology/approach

The Adapt-ABLE approach is suggested based on a constructive research approach, where extensive theoretical development of the Adapt-ABLE concept is developed. It consists of four integrated platforms that undergo theoretical and analogical development and validations through applicable theories, a workshop, four brainstorming sessions and a focus group.

Findings

The proposed Adapt-ABLE approach utilises process optimisation techniques through an IT system for streamlining the process. The merits of the semi-automated system include the development of a preventive measure that allows measurement of suitability index of homes for the occupants, indicative assessment that shorten the application duration, procurement and contracting platform that utilises principles based on framework agreement and call-off contract, and a platform that standardised performance management for continuous improvement.

Originality/value

The Adapt-ABLE solution will cut the application journey of non-qualified applicants and suggest where help can be sought. The qualified applicants' application journey will also be shortened through an online indicative assessment regime and early online resources (means) testing. Overall, the proposed system reduces the waiting time, and timely delivery improves the applicant's quality of life by living independently. It will potentially save the NHS billions of pounds used to replace hips and residential care costs due to lengthy delays in the housing adaptations process.

Details

International Journal of Building Pathology and Adaptation, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-4708

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 November 2006

Tim Dixon, Yasmin Pocock and Mike Waters

This study aims to provide a review of brownfield policy and the emerging sustainable development agenda in the UK, and to examine the development industry's (both…

4184

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to provide a review of brownfield policy and the emerging sustainable development agenda in the UK, and to examine the development industry's (both commercial and residential) role and attitudes towards brownfield regeneration and contaminated land.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper analyses results from a two‐stage survey of commercial and residential developers carried out in mid‐2004, underpinned by structured interviews with 11 developers.

Findings

The results suggest that housebuilding on brownfield is no longer the preserve of specialists, and is now widespread throughout the industry in the UK. The redevelopment of contaminated sites for residential use could be threatened by the impact of the EU Landfill Directive. The findings also suggest that developers are not averse to developing on contaminated sites, although post‐remediation stigma remains an issue. The market for warranties and insurance continues to evolve.

Research limitations/implications

The survey is based on a sample which represents nearly 30 per cent of UK volume housebuilding. Although the response in the smaller developer groups was relatively under‐represented, non‐response bias was not found to be a significant issue. More research is needed to assess the way in which developers approach brownfield regeneration at a local level.

Practical implications

The research suggests that clearer Government guidance in the UK is needed on how to integrate concepts of sustainability in brownfield development and that EU policy, which has been introduced for laudable aims, is creating tensions within the development industry. There may be an emphasis towards greenfield development in the future, as the implications of the Barker review are felt.

Originality/value

This is a national survey of developers' attitudes towards brownfield development in the UK, following the Barker Review, and highlights key issues in UK and EU policy layers.

Details

Journal of Property Investment & Finance, vol. 24 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-578X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 1972

This year has seen a jump in orders for new factories. Roger Eglin, of The Observer, talks to IDC chairman Howard Hicks, pictured in his pre‐cast concrete plant, and…

Abstract

This year has seen a jump in orders for new factories. Roger Eglin, of The Observer, talks to IDC chairman Howard Hicks, pictured in his pre‐cast concrete plant, and others about the market for expansion‐minded firms.

Details

Industrial Management, vol. 72 no. 7-8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-6929

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