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Article
Publication date: 24 July 2020

Jeffrey P. Kaleta and Lakshman Mahadevan

Research of people’s perceptions of trust, privacy and risk on the internet has generally neglected the impact of the variety of channels used to access the internet…

Abstract

Purpose

Research of people’s perceptions of trust, privacy and risk on the internet has generally neglected the impact of the variety of channels used to access the internet. People primarily access the internet using internet channels at home, work, public Wi-Fi (hotspots) or through their mobile data network. The technology infrastructure of each of these channels combined with the vulnerabilities of the environment may form different perceptions, as it relates to trust, privacy and risk. The purpose of this study is to understand how people perceive the home and public Wi-Fi channel from a trust, privacy and risk perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

Adapting existing trust, privacy and risk scales, the authors conducted a survey of people’s perceptions, as it relates to home and public Wi-Fi internet channels.

Findings

The results of this study suggest significant differences in people’s perception of trust and risk depending on an internet channel. However, with regard to privacy, the results of this study provide non-conclusive, yet intriguing, outcomes motivating the need for future studies.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study that parses out people’s perceptions of trust, privacy and risk, as it pertains to specific internet channels. The authors expect future research to benefit from their findings of how different channel perceptions influence people’s online activities.

Details

Journal of Systems and Information Technology, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1328-7265

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Article
Publication date: 4 September 2019

Konstantina Vemou and Maria Karyda

This paper aims to practically guide privacy impact assessment (PIA) implementation by proposing a PIA process incorporating best practices from existing PIA guidelines…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to practically guide privacy impact assessment (PIA) implementation by proposing a PIA process incorporating best practices from existing PIA guidelines and privacy research.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper critically reviews and assesses generic PIA methods proposed by related research, data protection authorities and standard’s organizations, to identify best practices and practically support PIA practitioners. To address identified gaps, best practices from privacy literature are proposed.

Findings

This paper proposes a PIA process based on best practices, as well as an evaluation framework for existing PIA guidelines, focusing on practical support to PIA practitioners.

Practical implications

The proposed PIA process facilitates PIA practitioners in organizing and implementing PIA projects. This paper also provides an evaluation framework, comprising a comprehensive set of 17 criteria, for PIA practitioners to assess whether PIA methods/guidelines can adequately support requirements of their PIA projects (e.g. special legal framework and needs for PIA project organization guidance).

Originality/value

This research extends PIA guidelines (e.g. ISO 29134) by providing comprehensive and practical guidance to PIA practitioners. The proposed PIA process is based on best practices identified from evaluation of nine commonly used PIA methods, enriched with guidelines from privacy literature, to accommodate gaps and support tasks that were found to be inadequately described or lacking practical guidance.

Details

Information & Computer Security, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4961

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Article
Publication date: 10 October 2016

Anil Gurung and M.K. Raja

Privacy and security concerns of consumers have been touted as one of the hindrances to the growth of e-commerce. These concerns increase the risk perception of consumers…

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Abstract

Purpose

Privacy and security concerns of consumers have been touted as one of the hindrances to the growth of e-commerce. These concerns increase the risk perception of consumers. Understanding the consequences of privacy and security concerns and their relationship to risk perceptions may provide a solution. The relationship between privacy and security is investigated using the theory of planned behavior. The study aims to examine the relationship of trust, privacy and security concerns to the risk perception adoption of e-commerce. The results from a survey validate the model.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected using survey from undergraduate business students. The respondents were requested to select a specific product that they plan to purchase in the next six months. After selecting a product, the respondents were requested to report an online company that they have recently visited which offers the selected product. The respondents were requested to fill out the survey with regard to their selected online company. Time given was approximately 20 min.

Findings

The results suggest that privacy and security concerns and trust beliefs had effects on risk perception. Among these effects, trust had the largest effect followed by privacy and security concerns. Furthermore, risk perception and trust beliefs had effects on attitude. The effect of trust beliefs on attitude was larger than the effect of risk perception on attitude. Similarly, subjective norm, perceived behavioral control and attitude had a positive and direct effect on intention to be involved in e-commerce.

Research limitations/implications

The first limitation of this study is the use of student subjects. Because this study took place in an educational setting, its generalizability to the general population of consumers lacks to some degree. The second limitation of this study is mono-method bias.

Practical implications

The effect of privacy concerns on risk perception was larger than that of security concerns. Because the consumers get more experienced and sophisticated using the Web, the security concerns that they may have had at the beginning are not reflected in their risk perceptions. It is likely that they have adopted protective measures on their own to defend their privacy online. An example of such a measure would be providing false information to online companies when asked to submit personal information.

Originality/value

The major contributions of this study are developing and validating an integrative framework of e-commerce adoption at the individual level. The model includes privacy and security concerns, risk perception and trust beliefs. This study also highlighted the distinction of constructs of privacy and security concerns and showed their differential effects on other related constructs in the research model.

Details

Information & Computer Security, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4961

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Article
Publication date: 20 January 2022

Yongqiang Sun, Fei Zhang and Yafei Feng

This paper aimed to explain why individuals still tend to disclose their privacy information even when privacy risks are high and whether individuals disclose or withhold…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aimed to explain why individuals still tend to disclose their privacy information even when privacy risks are high and whether individuals disclose or withhold information following the same logic.

Design/methodology/approach

This study develops a configurational decision tree model (CDTM) for precisely understanding individuals' decision-making process of privacy disclosure. A survey of location-based social network service (LBSNS) users was conducted to collect data, and fuzzy-set qualitative comparative analysis (fsQCA) was adopted to validate the hypotheses.

Findings

This paper identified two configurations for high and low disclosure, respectively, and found that the benefits and the risks did not function independently but interdependently, and the justice would play a crucial role when both the benefits and the risks were high. Furthermore, the authors found that there were asymmetric mechanisms for high disclosure and low disclosure, and males focused more on perceived usefulness, while females concerned more about perceived enjoyment, privacy risks and perceived justice.

Originality/value

This paper further extends privacy calculus model (PCM) and deepens the understanding of the privacy calculus process from a configurational perspective. In addition, this study also provides guidance for future research on how to adopt the configurational approach with qualitative comparative analysis (QCA) to revise and improve relevant theories for information systems (IS) behavioral research.

Details

Aslib Journal of Information Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-3806

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Article
Publication date: 16 July 2021

Hyunjin Kang, Wonsun Shin and Junru Huang

This study investigates how different parental mediation strategies (active versus restrictive) and teen Douyin users' privacy risk perceptions are associated with their…

Abstract

Purpose

This study investigates how different parental mediation strategies (active versus restrictive) and teen Douyin users' privacy risk perceptions are associated with their privacy management behaviors.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey with teen Douyin users (N = 500) was administered in mainland China.

Findings

Perceived privacy risk leads teenagers to implement stricter privacy management strategies. However, different types of parental mediation have different impacts on teens' privacy management behaviors. Discussion-based active mediation is positively correlated with privacy disclosure and privacy boundary linkage, while rule-based restrictive mediation is positively associated with privacy boundary control. In addition, active mediation encourages teens to use their own judgment about privacy risks when deciding how much personal information to disclose and with whom they want to share their information. Conversely, restrictive mediation results in teens making decisions about disclosing private information without taking their own risk assessments into account.

Originality/value

Video-sharing social media platforms like TikTok and Douyin have become a cultural trend among teen social media users. However, loss of privacy is a potentially serious downside of using such platforms. Despite the platforms' popularity among this age group, little is known about the ways teens manage their privacy on such social media platforms. By examining how teens' privacy risk perception and parental intervention shape three different aspects of privacy boundary management (i.e. privacy disclosure, privacy boundary linkage, and privacy boundary control), this study provides a comprehensive understanding of teen Douyin users' privacy management.

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Article
Publication date: 18 May 2020

Eleni-Laskarina Makri, Zafeiroula Georgiopoulou and Costas Lambrinoudakis

This study aims to assist organizations to protect the privacy of their users and the security of the data that they store and process. Users may be the customers of the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to assist organizations to protect the privacy of their users and the security of the data that they store and process. Users may be the customers of the organization (people using the offered services) or the employees (users who operate the systems of the organization). To be more specific, this paper proposes a privacy impact assessment (PIA) method that explicitly takes into account the organizational characteristics and employs a list of well-defined metrics as input, demonstrating its applicability to two hospital information systems with different characteristics.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents a PIA method that employs metrics and takes into account the peculiarities and other characteristics of the organization. The applicability of the method has been demonstrated on two Hospital Information Systems with different characteristics. The aim is to assist the organizations to estimate the criticality of potential privacy breaches and, thus, to select the appropriate security measures for the protection of the data that they collect, process and store.

Findings

The results of the proposed PIA method highlight the criticality of each privacy principle for every data set maintained by the organization. The method employed for the calculation of the criticality level, takes into account the consequences that the organization may experience in case of a security or privacy violation incident on a specific data set, the weighting of each privacy principle and the unique characteristics of each organization. So, the results of the proposed PIA method offer a strong indication of the security measures and privacy enforcement mechanisms that the organization should adopt to effectively protect its data.

Originality/value

The novelty of the method is that it handles security and privacy requirements simultaneously, as it uses the results of risk analysis together with those of a PIA. A further novelty of the method is that it introduces metrics for the quantification of the requirements and also that it takes into account the specific characteristics of the organization.

Details

Information & Computer Security, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4961

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Article
Publication date: 25 May 2010

Mauricio S. Featherman, Anthony D. Miyazaki and David E. Sprott

The paper aims to examine ways to reduce privacy risk and its effects so that adoption of e‐services can be enhanced.

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7264

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to examine ways to reduce privacy risk and its effects so that adoption of e‐services can be enhanced.

Design/methodology/approach

Consumers that form a viable target market for an e‐service are presented with the task of experiencing the e‐service and expressing their attitudes and intentions toward it. Structural equation modeling is used to analyze the responses.

Findings

The paper finds that consumer beliefs that the e‐service will be easy to use and that the e‐service provider is credible and capable reduce privacy risk and its effects, thus enhancing adoption likelihood.

Research limitations/implications

The focus on a financial services product (online bill paying) suggests that similar research should be conducted with other high‐risk e‐services (such as those dealing with healthcare) and lower‐risk e‐services (such as subscription services and social networks).

Practical implications

In addition to addressing consumers' privacy risk directly, e‐service providers can also reduce privacy risk and its effects by enhancing corporate credibility and perceived ease of use of the service. Increased assessments of privacy risk perceptions and efforts to reduce those perceptions will likely yield higher usage rates for e‐services.

Originality/value

The use of the technology acceptance model from information systems research, combined with a multi‐faceted conceptualization of privacy risk, moves the examination of privacy risk to a higher level, particularly in light of the examination of the additional factors of perceived ease of use and corporate credibility.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 27 March 2020

Alisa Frik and Alexia Gaudeul

Many online transactions and digital services depend on consumers’ willingness to take privacy risks, such as when shopping online, joining social networks, using online…

Abstract

Purpose

Many online transactions and digital services depend on consumers’ willingness to take privacy risks, such as when shopping online, joining social networks, using online banking or interacting with e-health platforms. Their decisions depend on not only how much they would suffer if their data were revealed but also how uncomfortable they feel about taking such a risk. Such an aversion to risk is a neglected factor when evaluating the value of privacy. The aim of this paper is to propose an empirical method to measure both privacy risk aversion and privacy worth and how those affect privacy decisions.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors let individuals play privacy lotteries and derive a measure of the value of privacy under risk (VPR) and empirically test the validity of this measure in a laboratory experiment with 148 participants. Individuals were asked to make a series of incentivized decisions on whether to incur the risk of revealing private information to other participants.

Findings

The results confirm that the willingness to incur a privacy risk is driven by a complex array of factors, including risk aversion, self-reported value for private information and general attitudes to privacy (derived from surveys). The VPR does not depend on whether there is a preexisting threat to privacy. The authors find qualified support for the existence of an order effect, whereby presenting financial choices prior to privacy ones leads to less concern for privacy.

Practical implications

Attitude to risk in the domain of privacy decisions is largely understudied. In this paper, the authors take a first step toward closing this empirical and methodological gap by offering (and validating) a method for the incentivized elicitation of the implicit VPR and proposing a robust and meaningful monetary measure of the level of aversion to privacy risks. This measure is a crucial step in designing and implementing the practical strategies for evaluating privacy as a competitive advantage and designing markets for privacy risk regulations (e.g. through cyber insurances).

Social implications

The present study advances research on the economics of consumer privacy – one of the most controversial topics in the digital age. In light of the proliferation of privacy regulations, the mentioned method for measuring the VPR provides an important instrument for policymakers’ informed decisions regarding what tradeoffs consumers consider beneficial and fair and where to draw the line for violations of consumers’ expectations, preferences and welfare.

Originality/value

The authors present a novel method to measure the VPR that takes account of both the value of private information to consumers and their tolerance for privacy risks. The authors explain how this method can be used more generally to elicit attitudes to a wide range of privacy risks involving exposure of various types of private information.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 37 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 22 June 2021

Behnood Momenzadeh, Shakthidhar Gopavaram, Sanchari Das and L. Jean Camp

The purpose of this paper is to propose practical and usable interactions that will allow more informed, risk-aware comparisons for individuals during app selections. The…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose practical and usable interactions that will allow more informed, risk-aware comparisons for individuals during app selections. The authors include an explicit argument for the role of human decision-making during app selection and close with a discussion of the strengths of a Bayesian approach to evaluating privacy and security interventions.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors focused on the risk communication in mobile marketplace’s realm, examining how risk indicators can help people choose more secure and privacy-preserving apps. Combining canonical findings in risk perception with previous work in usable security, the authors designed indicators for each app to enable decisions that prioritize risk avoidance. Specifically, the authors performed a natural experiment with N = 60 participants, where they asked them to select applications on Android tablets with accurate real-time marketplace data.

Findings

In the aggregate, the authors found that app selections changed to be more risk-averse in the presence of a user-centered multi-level warning system using visual indicators that enabled a click-thru to the more detailed risk and permissions information.

Originality/value

Privacy research in the laboratory is often in conflict with privacy decision-making in the marketplace, resulting in a privacy paradox. To better understand this, the authors implemented a research design based on clinical experimental approaches, testing the interaction in a noisy, confounded field environment.

Details

Information & Computer Security, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4961

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Article
Publication date: 6 July 2020

Jengchung Victor Chen, Sorawit Biamukda and Sinh Thi Thu Tran

This study aims at investigating the effects of two-way review system and how reach and richness of information influence the perceptions of risks and benefits among…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims at investigating the effects of two-way review system and how reach and richness of information influence the perceptions of risks and benefits among service providers and their intention to continue sharing their property on sharing economy.

Design/methodology/approach

To generate the variance, a 2 × 2 × 2 full factorial experiment was conducted to collect data. The research model was then tested using the structural equation model technique.

Findings

The study finds that reach of information predicts the social and economic benefits among service providers, while richness of information negatively relates to perceived informational privacy risks, which, in turn, significantly influence the decision of the service providers to continue sharing. The results also suggest that the existence of the two-way review system weakens the effects of reach on perceived social benefits and of richness on perceived informational privacy risks.

Originality/value

The present study investigates the two-way review system as the intervention of platforms to protect the service providers. Also, the emphasis is on the service providers rather than on consumers on sharing economy platforms to investigate their behavioral intention as customers on such platforms.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 120 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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