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Article
Publication date: 25 May 2021

Jakob Wirth, Christian Maier, Sven Laumer and Tim Weitzel

“Smart devices think you're “too lazy” to opt out of privacy defaults” was the headline of a recent news report indicating that individuals might be too lazy to stop…

Abstract

Purpose

“Smart devices think you're “too lazy” to opt out of privacy defaults” was the headline of a recent news report indicating that individuals might be too lazy to stop disclosing their private information and therefore to protect their information privacy. In current privacy research, privacy concerns and self-disclosure are central constructs regarding protecting privacy. One might assume that being concerned about protecting privacy would lead individuals to disclose less personal information. However, past research has shown that individuals continue to disclose personal information despite high privacy concerns, which is commonly referred to as the privacy paradox. This study introduces laziness as a personality trait in the privacy context, asking to what degree individual laziness influences privacy issues.

Design/methodology/approach

After conceptualizing, defining and operationalizing laziness, the authors analyzed information collected in a longitudinal empirical study and evaluated the results through structural equation modeling.

Findings

The findings show that the privacy paradox holds true, yet the level of laziness influences it. In particular, the privacy paradox applies to very lazy individuals but not to less lazy individuals.

Research limitations/implications

With these results one can better explain the privacy paradox and self-disclosure behavior.

Practical implications

The state might want to introduce laws that not only bring organizations to handle information in a private manner but also make it as easy as possible for individuals to protect their privacy.

Originality/value

Based on a literature review, a clear research gap has been identified, filled by this research study.

Details

Internet Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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Article
Publication date: 14 May 2020

Gajendra Liyanaarachchi

This paper aims to demonstrate how building competency in privacy can be used to transform the corporate strategy to generate a sustainable competitive advantage. A novel…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to demonstrate how building competency in privacy can be used to transform the corporate strategy to generate a sustainable competitive advantage. A novel framework is presented as a guide to redesigning strategy by striking a balance between customer expectation and organizational objectives. In doing so, the paper offers four possible outcomes of accommodation, accumulation, association and affiliation, providing illustrations to each scenario for strategy formulation.

Design/methodology/approach

The relationship between privacy paradox and corporate strategy was examined through a qualitative research study. The author conducted 30 in-depth interviews on grounded theory methodology investigating customer insights on the nature and extent of privacy protection associated with e-commerce and organizational approach.

Findings

The customers are dissatisfied with existing data security strategies adopted by firms in protecting privacy. The over-reliance on systems has negatively influenced the communication between the organization and customers, leading to a possible competitive disadvantage. The firms need to redesign privacy strategy shifting from a system-driven approach to providing personalized service.

Originality/value

This paper presents a novel framework the privacy strategy matrix (PSM), introducing privacy as a strategic expedient in transforming corporate strategy facilitating privacy protection as a metaphor for differentiation. PSM framework provides a standard to evaluate the effectiveness of the corporate strategy in managing privacy manifesting a path toward deriving a sustainable competitive advantage.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 41 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

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Article
Publication date: 13 March 2020

Tim Schürmann, Nina Gerber and Paul Gerber

Online privacy research has seen a focus on user behavior over the last decade, partly to understand and explain user decision-making and seeming inconsistencies regarding…

Abstract

Purpose

Online privacy research has seen a focus on user behavior over the last decade, partly to understand and explain user decision-making and seeming inconsistencies regarding users' stated preferences. This article investigates the level of modeling that contemporary approaches rely on to explain said inconsistencies and whether drawn conclusions are justified by the applied modeling methodology. Additionally, it provides resources for researchers interested in using computational modeling.

Design/methodology/approach

The article uses data from a pre-existing literature review on the privacy paradox (N = 179 articles) to identify three characteristics of prior research: (1) the frequency of references to computational-level theories of human decision-making and perception in the literature, (2) the frequency of interpretations of human decision-making based on computational-level theories, and (3) the frequency of actual computational-level modeling implementations.

Findings

After excluding unrelated articles, 44.1 percent of investigated articles reference at least one theory that has been traditionally interpreted on a computational level. 33.1 percent of all relevant articles make statements regarding computational properties of human cognition in online privacy scenarios. Meanwhile, 5.1 percent of all relevant articles apply formalized computational-level modeling to substantiate their claims.

Originality/value

The findings highlight the importance of formal, computational-level modeling in online privacy research, which has so far drawn computational-level conclusions without utilizing appropriate modeling techniques. Furthermore, this article provides an overview of said modeling techniques and their benefits to researchers, as well as references for model theories and resources for practical implementation.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

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Article
Publication date: 11 December 2020

Aylin Ilhan and Kaja J. Fietkiewicz

This investigation aims to examine the differences and similarities between activity tracking technology users from two regions (the USA and Germany) in their intended…

Abstract

Purpose

This investigation aims to examine the differences and similarities between activity tracking technology users from two regions (the USA and Germany) in their intended privacy-related behavior. The focus lies on data handling after hypothetical discontinuance of use, data protection and privacy policy seeking, and privacy concerns.

Design/methodology/approach

The data was collected through an online survey in 2019. In order to identify significant differences between participants from Germany and the USA, the chi-squared test and the Mann–Whitney U test were applied.

Findings

The intensity of several privacy-related concerns was significantly different between the two groups. The majority of the participants did not inform themselves about the respective data privacy policies or terms and conditions before installing an activity tracking application. The majority of the German participants knew that they could request the deletion of all their collected data. In contrast, only 35% out of 68 participants from the US knew about this option.

Research limitations/implications

This study intends to raise awareness about managing the collected health and fitness data after stopping to use activity tracking technologies. Furthermore, to reduce privacy and security concerns, the involvement of the government, companies and users is necessary to handle and share data more considerably and in a sustainable way.

Originality/value

This study sheds light on users of activity tracking technologies from a broad perspective (here, participants from the USA and Germany). It incorporates not only concerns and the privacy paradox but (intended) user behavior, including seeking information on data protection and privacy policy and handling data after hypothetical discontinuance of use of the technology.

Details

Aslib Journal of Information Management, vol. 73 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-3806

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Article
Publication date: 13 September 2018

Ching-Hsuan Yeh, Yi-Shun Wang, Shin-Jeng Lin, Timmy H. Tseng, Hsin-Hui Lin, Ying-Wei Shih and Yi-Hsuan Lai

Considering that users’ information privacy concerns may affect the development of e-commerce, the purpose of this paper is to explore what drives internet users…

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Abstract

Purpose

Considering that users’ information privacy concerns may affect the development of e-commerce, the purpose of this paper is to explore what drives internet users’ willingness to provide personal information; further, the paper examines how extrinsic rewards moderate the relationship between users’ information privacy concerns and willingness to provide personal information.

Design/methodology/approach

Data collected from 345 valid internet users in the context of electronic commerce were analyzed using the partial least squares approach.

Findings

The result showed that agreeableness, risk-taking propensity and experience of privacy invasion were three main antecedents of information privacy concerns among the seven individual factors. Additionally, information privacy concerns did not significantly affect users’ willingness to provide personal information in the privacy calculation mechanism; however, extrinsic rewards directly affected users’ disclosure intention. The authors found that extrinsic rewards had not moderated the relationship between users’ information privacy concerns and their willingness to provide personal information.

Originality/value

This study is an exploratory effort to develop and validate a model for explaining why internet users were willing to provide personal information. The results of this study are helpful to researchers in developing theories of information privacy concerns and to practitioners in promoting internet users’ willingness to provide personal information in an e-commerce context.

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Article
Publication date: 26 November 2019

Le Wang, Hai-Hua Hu, Jie Yan and Maggie Qiuzhu Mei

The purpose of this paper is to explore the antecedents of self-disclosure intention on mobile social applications. This study integrates privacy calculus model and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the antecedents of self-disclosure intention on mobile social applications. This study integrates privacy calculus model and elaboration likelihood theory to reconcile the rational and heuristic views of privacy decision making.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a “random dialing” sampling method, an empirical survey with 913 respondents was conducted. A series of regression models were employed to test the proposed relationships. Robust checks with sub-group analysis were conducted.

Findings

Self-disclosure intention develops along a dual route including the central route and the peripheral route. When the central route predominates, social media users form their attitudes toward self-disclosure based on a rational calculus of the privacy concern and perceived rewards. When the peripheral route predominates, users perform a more heuristic evaluation of relevant informational cues (information about privacy harms, the extent of information asymmetry between users and operators) and contextual cues (flow experience, privacy disclosure of friends). Peripheral cues moderate the relationships between central cues and self-disclosure intention.

Originality/value

This paper extends the Elaboration Likelihood Model by investigating the interaction between the central route and peripheral route. The results provide alternative explanations on the renowned “privacy paradox” phenomenon.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

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Article
Publication date: 9 July 2018

Dirk P. Snyman, Hennie Kruger and Wayne D. Kearney

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the lemming effect as a possible cause for the privacy paradox in information security.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the lemming effect as a possible cause for the privacy paradox in information security.

Design/methodology/approach

Behavioural threshold analysis is used to test for the presence of the lemming effect in information security behaviour. Paradoxical behaviour may be caused by the influential nature of the lemming effect. The lemming effect is presented as a possible cause of the privacy paradox.

Findings

The behavioural threshold analysis indicates that the lemming effect is indeed present in information security behaviour and may lead to paradoxical information security behaviour.

Practical implications

The analysis of the lemming effect can be used to assist companies in understanding the way employees influence each other in their behaviour in terms of security. By identifying possible problem areas, this approach can also assist in directing their information security education endeavours towards the most relevant topics.

Originality/value

This research describes the first investigation of the lemming effect in information security by means of behavioural threshold analysis in practice.

Details

Information & Computer Security, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4961

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Article
Publication date: 8 August 2016

Don Heath, Ali Ardestani and Hamid Nemati

Human genomic research (HGR) demands very large pools of data to generate meaningful inference. Yet, the sharing of one’s genetic data for research is a voluntary act. The…

Abstract

Purpose

Human genomic research (HGR) demands very large pools of data to generate meaningful inference. Yet, the sharing of one’s genetic data for research is a voluntary act. The collection of data sufficient to fuel rapid advancement is contingent on individuals’ willingness to share. Privacy risks associated with sharing this unique and intensely personal data are significant. Genetic data are an unambiguous identifier. Public linkage of donor to their genetic data could reveal predisposition to diseases, behaviors, paternity, heredity, intelligence, etc. The purpose of this paper is to understand individuals’ willingness to volunteer their private information in this high-risk/high-reward context.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors collect survey data from 273 respondents and use structural equation modeling techniques to analyze responses.

Findings

The authors find statistical support for our theorization. They find that while heightened awareness of the benefits and risks of sharing correlates with increased privacy concerns, the net impact is an increase in intention to share.

Social implications

The findings suggest that prescriptive awareness might be an effective tool with which policy-makers can gain the sufficient voluntary participation from individuals necessary to drive large-scale medical research.

Originality/value

This study contributes a theoretically and empirically informed model which demonstrates the impact of awareness and privacy concern on individuals’ willingness to share their genetic data for large-scale HGR. It helps inform a rising class of data sufficiency problems related to large-scale medical research.

Details

Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-996X

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Book part
Publication date: 1 February 2021

Natalia Kucirkova

Abstract

Details

The Future of the Self: Understanding Personalization in Childhood and Beyond
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-945-0

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Article
Publication date: 4 September 2019

Ibrahim M. Al-Jabri, Mustafa I. Eid and Amer Abed

Customer privacy and security are major concerns. Online firms worldwide collect customer data for various reasons. This study aims to investigate factors that motivate…

Abstract

Purpose

Customer privacy and security are major concerns. Online firms worldwide collect customer data for various reasons. This study aims to investigate factors that motivate and hinder a customer’s willingness to disclose personal information (WTD) to online firms on e-commerce websites.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on an extensive literature review, three sets of factors have been identified. These sets of factors are privacy concern, perceived disclosure benefits and privacy assurances. It is hypothesized that privacy concerns negatively affect the disclosure of personal information, while the perceived benefits of disclosure have positive effects. Privacy assurances would positively affect information disclosure and attenuate the negative effect of privacy concerns on the disclosure of personal information. The authors gathered data from 253 online customers in Saudi Arabia.

Findings

The results indicate that perceived disclosure benefits and privacy concerns have a significant positive and negative relationship, respectively, with WTD online. Privacy assurances had neither a direct nor a moderating effect on information disclosure.

Research limitations/implications

The findings will inform online firms about the factors that prevent or motivate customers to disclose personal information.

Originality/value

The effect of privacy concerns and benefits on personal information disclosure are not fully understood in Saudi Arabia. This study reveals more insights into the specific factors that make online customers reluctant or motivated to disclose their personal information.

Details

Information & Computer Security, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4961

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