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Article
Publication date: 7 March 2016

Khaldoun I. Ababneh and Mohammed A. Al-Waqfi

Building on organizational justice and privacy literatures, the purpose of this paper is to test a model capturing the impacts of potentially inappropriate/discriminatory…

Abstract

Purpose

Building on organizational justice and privacy literatures, the purpose of this paper is to test a model capturing the impacts of potentially inappropriate/discriminatory interview questions on job applicant perceptions and behavioral intentions in a developing economy context with a multicultural workforce.

Design/methodology/approach

An experimental design using senior undergraduate students (n=221) seeking or about to seek jobs in the United Arab Emirates was used to examine interviewees’ reactions to inappropriate/discriminatory interview questions. A questionnaire was used to collect the data. Structural equation modeling and bootstrapping were used for data analysis and hypothesis testing.

Findings

This study demonstrates that inappropriate/discriminatory interview questions influence privacy invasion perceptions, which in turn influence job applicants’ fairness perceptions and behavioral intentions. This study also demonstrates that privacy invasion perceptions fully mediate the effect of inappropriate/discriminatory employment interview questions on fairness perceptions. Moreover, the findings show that privacy invasion directly and indirectly, via fairness perceptions, influence litigation intentions. On the other hand, findings of this study indicate that privacy invasion influence organizational attractiveness and recommendation intentions only indirectly, via fairness perceptions.

Originality/value

This is the first study to examine the impact of inappropriate/discriminatory interview questions on applicant reactions in a developing economy context with social, cultural, and legal environment that is different from those prevailing in developed Western societies. This study demonstrates that privacy invasion is an important mechanism to understand job applicant reactions to inappropriate interview questions.

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Article
Publication date: 2 August 2019

Le Wang, Zao Sun, Xiaoyong Dai, Yixin Zhang and Hai-hua Hu

The purpose of this paper is to facilitate understanding of how to mitigate the privacy concerns of users who have experienced privacy invasions.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to facilitate understanding of how to mitigate the privacy concerns of users who have experienced privacy invasions.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on the communication privacy management theory, the authors developed a model suggesting that privacy concerns form through a cognitive process involving threat-coping appraisals, institutional privacy assurances and privacy experiences. The model was tested using data from an empirical survey with 913 randomly selected social media users.

Findings

Privacy concerns are jointly determined by perceived privacy risks and privacy self-efficacy. The perceived effectiveness of institutional privacy assurances in terms of established privacy policies and privacy protection technology influences the perceptions of privacy risks and privacy self-efficacy. More specifically, privacy invasion experiences are negatively associated with the perceived effectiveness of institutional privacy assurances.

Research limitations/implications

Privacy concerns are conceptualized as general concerns that reflect an individual’s worry about the possible loss of private information. The specific types of private information were not differentiated.

Originality/value

This paper is among the first to clarify the specific mechanisms through which privacy invasion experiences influence privacy concerns. Privacy concerns have long been viewed as resulting from individual actions. The study contributes to literature by linking privacy concerns with institutional privacy practice.

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Article
Publication date: 18 July 2019

Pablo Zoghbi-Manrique-de-Lara and Maryamsadat Sharifiatashgah

The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, the relationship between crowding perceptions (i.e. employees’ perceptions of insufficient personal space due to offices…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, the relationship between crowding perceptions (i.e. employees’ perceptions of insufficient personal space due to offices’ physical constraints) and deviant workplace behaviors (DWBs) directed at both the organization as a whole (DWB-O) and individuals (DWB-I); and second, privacy invasion from supervisors and peers as a mediator.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 299 respondents working in open-plan offices at four medium-to-large sized IT-based companies. Drawing on conservation of resources theory, the paper suggests that under crowding conditions employees can perceive the physical workspace as a space-related resource that is threatened leading them to engage in DWBs out of a conservation strategy.

Findings

Structural equation modeling results significantly supported main effects of employees’ crowding perceptions on the two types of DWBs, with privacy invasion from supervisors and peers as full mediator.

Research limitations/implications

The study could suffer from mono-method/source bias, and specificities of the studied IT-based companies and their work can raise concerns about the generalizability of the results.

Practical implications

The findings indicate that a proper physical office arrangement can be a useful tool for managers in combating employee DWB.

Originality/value

To date, the origin of workplace deviance has mainly been investigated in terms of the psychosocial work environment; however, the physical labor conditions (i.e. the layout of buildings, furniture, workspace, air conditioning, workplace density, etc.) have received little systematic attention.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 40 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 4 June 2021

Kristen Thomasen and Suzie Dunn

Perpetrators of Technology-Facilitated gender-based violence are taking advantage of increasingly automated and sophisticated privacy-invasive tools to carry out their…

Abstract

Perpetrators of Technology-Facilitated gender-based violence are taking advantage of increasingly automated and sophisticated privacy-invasive tools to carry out their abuse. Whether this be monitoring movements through stalkerware, using drones to nonconsensually film or harass, or manipulating and distributing intimate images online such as deepfakes and creepshots, invasions of privacy have become a significant form of gender-based violence. Accordingly, our normative and legal concepts of privacy must evolve to counter the harms arising from this misuse of new technology. Canada's Supreme Court recently addressed Technology-Facilitated violations of privacy in the context of voyeurism in R v Jarvis (2019) . The discussion of privacy in this decision appears to be a good first step toward a more equitable conceptualization of privacy protection. Building on existing privacy theories, this chapter examines what the reasoning in Jarvis might mean for “reasonable expectations of privacy” in other areas of law, and how this concept might be interpreted in response to gender-based Technology-Facilitated violence. The authors argue the courts in Canada and elsewhere must take the analysis in Jarvis further to fully realize a notion of privacy that protects the autonomy, dignity, and liberty of all.

Details

The Emerald International Handbook of Technology Facilitated Violence and Abuse
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-849-2

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

Drones and the Law
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-249-9

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2016

Kai Li, Xiaowen Wang, Kunrong Li and Jianguo Che

As social network sites (SNS) have increasingly become one of the most important channels for communication, the related privacy issues gain more and more attention in…

Abstract

Purpose

As social network sites (SNS) have increasingly become one of the most important channels for communication, the related privacy issues gain more and more attention in both industry and academic research fields. This study aims to connect the antecedents of information privacy disclosure on SNS.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on exchange theory, this study tries to investigate the decision-making process for information privacy disclosure on SNS. Factors from both user’s and website’s perspectives are taken into account in the proposed model.

Findings

The results suggest that an individual’s perceived benefits will increase their willingness to disclose information privacy on SNS, but perceived risks decrease this kind of willingness. The authors also find social network size, personal innovativeness and incentive provision positively affect people’s perceived benefits.

Originality/value

Moreover, privacy invasion experience enhances perceived personal risks, but website reputation helps to reduce perceived risks.

Details

Nankai Business Review International, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8749

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 September 2018

Ching-Hsuan Yeh, Yi-Shun Wang, Shin-Jeng Lin, Timmy H. Tseng, Hsin-Hui Lin, Ying-Wei Shih and Yi-Hsuan Lai

Considering that users’ information privacy concerns may affect the development of e-commerce, the purpose of this paper is to explore what drives internet users…

Abstract

Purpose

Considering that users’ information privacy concerns may affect the development of e-commerce, the purpose of this paper is to explore what drives internet users’ willingness to provide personal information; further, the paper examines how extrinsic rewards moderate the relationship between users’ information privacy concerns and willingness to provide personal information.

Design/methodology/approach

Data collected from 345 valid internet users in the context of electronic commerce were analyzed using the partial least squares approach.

Findings

The result showed that agreeableness, risk-taking propensity and experience of privacy invasion were three main antecedents of information privacy concerns among the seven individual factors. Additionally, information privacy concerns did not significantly affect users’ willingness to provide personal information in the privacy calculation mechanism; however, extrinsic rewards directly affected users’ disclosure intention. The authors found that extrinsic rewards had not moderated the relationship between users’ information privacy concerns and their willingness to provide personal information.

Originality/value

This study is an exploratory effort to develop and validate a model for explaining why internet users were willing to provide personal information. The results of this study are helpful to researchers in developing theories of information privacy concerns and to practitioners in promoting internet users’ willingness to provide personal information in an e-commerce context.

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Book part
Publication date: 11 June 2021

Sven Laumer and Christian Maier

Social media usage, especially social networking sites (SNSs), such as Facebook, Instagram, TikTok, Twitter, WhatsApp, YouTube, and LinkedIn provide lots of benefits to…

Abstract

Social media usage, especially social networking sites (SNSs), such as Facebook, Instagram, TikTok, Twitter, WhatsApp, YouTube, and LinkedIn provide lots of benefits to their users, including fun, information from significant others, and a distraction from real-life problems. In parallel, the authors see that there are also negative consequences, such as stress when using SNS. In 2012, research started to talk about SNS-use stress as a specific form of technostress. Since that early study, 62 articles have been published in peer-reviewed outlets that explain why SNS-users perceive stress. Our literature review uses the transactional model of stress to integrate these articles to propose a transactional model of SNS-use stress. The model indicates social and technical SNS-stressors that trigger psychological, physiological, and behavioural reactions, named SNS-strains. Our findings suggest there are more social SNS-stressors than technical ones. In terms of SNS-strain, research has mainly focussed on psychological, e.g. exhaustion or dissatisfaction, and behavioural, e.g. discontinuous usage intention or distraction, SNS-strains. Based on those results, the authors identify research gaps and provide implications for research, SNS-users, SNS-providers, organisations, and parents. With that, the authors aim to provide a conceptual summary of the past and, simultaneously, a starting point for further research.

Details

Information Technology in Organisations and Societies: Multidisciplinary Perspectives from AI to Technostress
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-812-3

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1994

Philip E. Agre and Christine A. Harbs

Broad coalitions of companies, governments, and research institutions inseveral countries are currently designing massive electronicinfrastructures for their roadways…

Abstract

Broad coalitions of companies, governments, and research institutions in several countries are currently designing massive electronic infrastructures for their roadways. Known collectively as intelligent vehicle‐highway systems (IVHS), these technologies are intended to ease toll collection and commercial vehicle regulation, provide drivers with route and traffic information, improve safety and ultimately support fully automated vehicles. Although many aspects of IVHS are uncertain, some proposed designs require the system to collect vast amounts of data on individuals′ travel patterns, thus raising the potential for severe invasions of privacy. To make social choices about IVHS, it is necessary to reason about potentials for authoritarian uses of an IVHS infrastructure in the hypothetical future. Yet such reasoning is difficult, often veering towards Utopian or dystopian extremes. To help anchor the privacy debate, places IVHS privacy concerns in an institutional context, offering conceptual frameworks to discuss the potential interactions between IVHS technologies and the computer design profession, standards‐setting bodies, marketing organizations, the legal system and government administrative agencies.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 August 2007

J. Alberto Castañeda, Francisco J. Montoso and Teodoro Luque

This study attempts to carry out an approximation both to the conceptual delimitation and to the measuring of customer concern for privacy on the electronic market.

Abstract

Purpose

This study attempts to carry out an approximation both to the conceptual delimitation and to the measuring of customer concern for privacy on the electronic market.

Design/methodology/approach

To complete the objective of this research, an overview of the literature is made in an attempt to summarise the main proposals as regards dimensions of the construct analysed. Furthermore, two studies were carried out with the aim of evaluating the instruments to measure concern for privacy on the internet and which support the conclusion concerning the construct's dimensionality, reached following the aforementioned literature overview.

Findings

From the main results reached, we can highlight that the concern for privacy on the internet construct has a structure consisting of two dimensions, which are confirmed through the scales evaluated for different contexts of use of the internet. These dimensions are: concern for control over the collecting of personal information, and its use on the electronic market.

Originality/value

The paper's main contributions are threefold: a conceptual revision of the construct; a proposal of the dimensions for the construct; and an evaluation of two scales to measure the construct in different situations.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 31 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

Keywords

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