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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2010

Anja Lorenz and Katrin Borcea‐Pfitzmann

Facing the dilemma between collaboration and privacy is a continual challenge for users. In this setting, the purpose of this paper is to discuss issues of a highly…

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340

Abstract

Purpose

Facing the dilemma between collaboration and privacy is a continual challenge for users. In this setting, the purpose of this paper is to discuss issues of a highly flexible role management integrated in a privacy‐enhanced collaborative environment (PECE).

Design/methodology/approach

The general framework was provided by former findings of several research projects, i.e. collaborative platform BluES and projects of privacy and identity management PRIME and PrimeLife. The role management concept bases on a literature survey and has been proofed by integration into the privacy‐enhanced environment BluES'n.

Findings

A three‐dimensional role management concept was developed describing users' rights, tasks, and positions. A discussion on how to fulfill privacy requirements yielded that a semi‐automated decision making regarding the use of roles with different identities is reasonable to support users' control of their privacy when interacting with others.

Research limitations/implications

The concept of flexible role management complies with the requirements of PECEs. However, a fully automated approach of rule‐based information disclosure is not possible as such decisions depend on personal and situational aspects.

Practical implications

Using the example of a flexible role management concept, research described in this paper demonstrates that privacy and interaction concerns can be balanced and should be considered in application design processes.

Social implications

Concepts of PECEs allow respecting privacy‐related attitudes and could improve the quality of service consumption.

Originality/value

The paper demonstrates contrasts between collaboration and privacy attitudes and presents solutions for the integration of role management to overcome this initially supposed contradiction.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2009

Maria Karyda, Stefanos Gritzalis, Jong Hyuk Park and Spyros Kokolakis

This paper aims to contribute to the ongoing discourse about the nature of privacy and its role in ubiquitous environments and provide insights for future research.

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1309

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to contribute to the ongoing discourse about the nature of privacy and its role in ubiquitous environments and provide insights for future research.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper analyses the privacy implications of particular characteristics of ubiquitous applications and discusses the fundamental principles and information practices used in digital environments for protecting individuals' private data.

Findings

A significant trend towards shifting privacy protection responsibility from government to the individuals is identified. Also, specific directions for future research are provided with a focus on interdisciplinary research.

Research limitations/implications

This paper identifies key research issues and provides directions for future research.

Originality/value

This study contributes by identifying major challenges that should be addressed, so that a set of “fair information principles” can be applied in the context of ubiquitous environments. It also discusses the limitations of these principles and provides recommendations for future research.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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Book part
Publication date: 4 December 2020

Abdelkebir Sahid, Yassine Maleh and Mustapha Belaissaoui

Abstract

Details

Strategic Information System Agility: From Theory to Practices
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-811-8

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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2015

Soraj Hongladarom

– The purpose of this study is to think ahead into the year 2035 and reflect on the ethical implications of brain-to-brain linking.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to think ahead into the year 2035 and reflect on the ethical implications of brain-to-brain linking.

Design/methodology/approach

Philosophical argument.

Findings

It is quite likely that the direction of technological research today is heading toward a closer integration of mind and machine in 2035. What is interesting is that the integration also makes mind-mind or brain-brain integration possible too. There is nothing in principle that would prevent hooking up more than one brain to a machine, or connecting two or more brains together to harness their processing power to tackle a very complicated task. If that happens, the whole notion of what it is to be an individual and a self will have to be rethought. I have offered a way in which that can be done: Instead of viewing the self as being contained in a closed space traditionally defined by the skin, the self can expand outside of the skin and merge temporarily with other selves too. This also has profound implications on the notion of privacy, especially on how it is conceptualized and justified.

Research limitations/implications

This research is limited to theoretical argumentation only. It relies on the current empirical and scientific investigations that are going on at the moment and provide ethical reflections on them.

Practical implications

We need to anticipate technological innovations to be more proactive in deliberating and formulating policy and ethical guidelines; otherwise, ethicists will just muse after the fact, implying that there is nothing further to be done.

Social implications

Brain-to-brain linking has tremendous social implications, so is the ethical reflection on the issue.

Originality/value

Argument purporting to show the specific content in ethical guidelines on brain-to-brain interlinking based on the metaphysics of the self that is directly implicated by the technology has not been done before, according to the author’s best knowledge.

Details

Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, vol. 13 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-996X

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2015

Wilson Abel Alberto Torres, Nandita Bhattacharjee and Bala Srinivasan

The purpose of this paper is to determine the effectiveness of using fully homomorphic encryption (FHE) to preserve the privacy of biometric data in an authentication…

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1096

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine the effectiveness of using fully homomorphic encryption (FHE) to preserve the privacy of biometric data in an authentication system. Biometrics offers higher accuracy for personal recognition than traditional methods because of its properties. Biometric data are permanently linked with an individual and cannot be revoked or cancelled, especially when biometric data are compromised, leading to privacy issues.

Design/methodology/approach

By reviewing current approaches, FHE is considered as a promising solution for the privacy issue because of its ability to perform computations in the encrypted domain. The authors studied the effectiveness of FHE in biometric authentication systems. In doing so, the authors undertake the study by implementing a protocol for biometric authentication system using iris.

Findings

The security analysis of the implementation scheme demonstrates the effectiveness of FHE to protect the privacy of biometric data, as unlimited operations can be performed in the encrypted domain, and the FHE secret key is not shared with any other party during the authentication protocol.

Research limitations/implications

The use of malicious model in the design of the authentication protocol to improve the privacy, packing methods and use of low-level programming language to enhance performance of the system needs to be further investigated.

Originality/value

The main contributions of this paper are the implementation of a privacy-preserving iris biometric authentication protocol adapted to lattice-based FHE and a sound security analysis of authentication and privacy.

Details

International Journal of Pervasive Computing and Communications, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1742-7371

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Article
Publication date: 18 December 2019

David A. Makin and Leanna Ireland

The purpose of this paper is to explore to what extent the legal environment influences a user’s choice to employ privacy-enhancing technologies (PETs). Drawing upon…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore to what extent the legal environment influences a user’s choice to employ privacy-enhancing technologies (PETs). Drawing upon existing theoretical frames specific to arbitrariness and uncertainty, this research examines whether interest in PETs is influenced by the legal environment of a country.

Design/methodology/approach

Using data from Google Trends, the International Property Rights Index, Freedom House and the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, the research analyzes interest in Tor, VPN technology and pretty good privacy (PGP) in 153 countries between 2012 and 2016.

Findings

Findings suggest both countries with both higher and lower arbitrariness and uncertainty of law are associated with an increased interest in Tor and PGP. However, interest in VPN technology does not appear influenced by the legal environment and, instead, is influenced by freedom within the press.

Research limitations/implications

The dual use nature of Tor and PGP is influenced by law enforcement and judiciary effectiveness and transparency and arbitrariness contributing to the public’s interest in decentralized technological protections.

Practical implications

Law enforcement should continue to police via the technologies rather than shutting them down to protect the identities of those needing to use these technologies for legitimate purposes. Only by embracing the technologies, as opposed to seeing them as hurdles to be banned, may law enforcement agencies remain vigilant to the threats posted by nefarious actors.

Originality/value

In this study, the authors introduce a more robust measure of interest in PETs, and do so with a larger, more substantive sample. By situating this interest within the context of policing, the authors can document the dual use nature of the technology, which can be useful in guiding future research, specifically in the area of policy development and officer training.

Details

Policing: An International Journal, vol. 43 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

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Article
Publication date: 23 November 2017

Christian Fuchs and Daniel Trottier

This paper aims to present results of a study that focused on the question of how computer and data experts think about Internet and social media surveillance after Edward…

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2154

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present results of a study that focused on the question of how computer and data experts think about Internet and social media surveillance after Edward Snowden’s revelations about the existence of mass-surveillance systems of the Internet such as Prism, XKeyscore and Tempora. Computer and data experts’ views are of particular relevance because they are confronted day by day with questions about the processing of personal data, privacy and data protection.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted two focus groups with a total of ten experts based in London. As London is considered by some as the surveillance capital of the world, and has a thriving Internet industry, it provided a well-suited context.

Findings

The focus group discussions featured three topics that are of crucial importance for understanding Internet and social media surveillance: the political economy surveillance in general; surveillance in the context of the Snowden revelations; and the question what the best political reactions are to the existence of a surveillance-industrial complex that results in political and economic control of the Internet and social media. The focus groups provided indications that computer and data experts are pre-eminently informed on how Internet surveillance works, are capable of critically assessing its implications for society and have ideas about on what should be done politically.

Originality/value

Studies of privacy and surveillance after Edward Snowden’s revelations have taken on a new dimension: Large-scale covert surveillance is conducted in a collaborative endeavour of secret services, private communications corporations and security companies. It has become evident that a surveillance-industrial Internet surveillance complex exists, in which capitalist communications and security corporations and state institutions collaborate.

Details

Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-996X

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Article
Publication date: 21 March 2008

Vasilios Katos and Ahmed Patel

This paper aims to propose a tool to help policy makers understand the dynamic relationships between security and privacy on a strategic (macro) level.

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1456

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to propose a tool to help policy makers understand the dynamic relationships between security and privacy on a strategic (macro) level.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology is ported from the discipline of Macroeconomics, and applied to the information security and privacy domain. The methodology adopted is the so‐called “cross methodology” which claims ownership of the well‐known supply/demand market equilibrium exercise.

Findings

Early evaluation reveals that this is a potentially very effective tool in understanding societal behaviour and position towards information security and privacy and therefore makes this a suitable tool for investigating and exploring scenarios that can assist in policy making.

Originality/value

Up to date, research on the economics of security and privacy has been primarily focusing on a micro level. The main contribution of this paper is a methodology for investigating privacy and security on a macro level. We believe that our approach in undertaking this research is new and looking at the issues and relationships between security and privacy at a macro level, gives a better understanding of the problems at hand and how to resolve them.

Practical implications

The proposed tool may increase the efficiency of policy making and planning as it enables the policy makers on a governmental and strategic level to run scenarios in order to investigate the effect of their decisions (for example, an introduction of a stricter law relating to computer misuse) to the delicate balance of security and privacy.

Details

Information Management & Computer Security, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-5227

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Hein S. Venter, Martin S. Olivier and Jan H.P. Eloff

It is well‐known that the primary threat against misuse of private data about individuals is present within the organisation; proposes a system that uses intrusion…

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1034

Abstract

It is well‐known that the primary threat against misuse of private data about individuals is present within the organisation; proposes a system that uses intrusion detection system (IDS) technologies to help safeguard such private information. Current IDSs attempt to detect intrusions on a low level whereas the proposed privacy IDS (PIDS) attempts to detect intrusions on a higher level. Contains information about information privacy and privacy‐enhancing technologies, the role that a current IDS could play in a privacy system, and a framework for a privacy IDS. The system works by identifying anomalous behaviour and reacts by throttling access to the data and/or issuing reports. It is assumed that the private information is stored in a central networked repository. Uses the proposed PIDS on the border between this repository and the rest of the organisation to identify attempts to misuse such information. A practical prototype of the system needs to be implemented in order to determine and test the practical feasibility of the system. Provides a source of information and guidelines on how to implement a privacy IDS based on existing IDSs.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 14 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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Article
Publication date: 14 August 2007

Jochen Wirtz, May O. Lwin and Jerome D. Williams

Past research on internet privacy has examined various aspects of privacy regulation and consumer privacy concerns. The purpose of this paper is to develop a conceptual…

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8051

Abstract

Purpose

Past research on internet privacy has examined various aspects of privacy regulation and consumer privacy concerns. The purpose of this paper is to develop a conceptual model that links anteceding environmental factors with the resulting consumer responses using the power‐responsibility equilibrium perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey of 182 net shoppers was conducted whereby respondents were asked to recall a recent web site registration that required them to provide personal information online.

Findings

The results indicate that robust perceived business policies and governmental regulation reduce consumer privacy concern. More interestingly, the data show that a perceived lack of business policy or governmental regulation will result in consumers attempting to regain power balance through a variety of responses. As predicted, increased concern resulted in higher power‐enhancing responses such as the fabrication of personal information, use of privacy‐enhancing technologies and refusal to purchase.

Practical implications

To reduce consumer privacy concern and subsequent negative responses, organizations need to pay close attention to their privacy policies through greater self‐regulation, third‐party accreditation and to ensure the presence of compliance mechanisms that support and check the marketing and collection activities of their organization and related parties. Regulators can reduce consumer concern by further defining and improving the legal framework for protecting consumer privacy on the internet. In addition, governments should consider overseeing third‐party privacy accreditation as well as firm and industry self‐regulation. Finally, to improve consumer perceptions of privacy protection, enhanced regulatory privacy protection should be communicated to the public along with a response outlet for privacy concerns so that consumers know that they should report privacy‐related complaints to a regulatory agency.

Originality/value

The paper examines how business policies and regulation influence consumer online privacy concern, and the resulting consequences on internet user behavior.

Details

International Journal of Service Industry Management, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-4233

Keywords

1 – 10 of 293