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Article
Publication date: 20 April 2010

Prisana Suwannaporn and Mark W. Speece

The aim of this paper is to measure new product development (NPD) success factors in the Thai food industry.

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3783

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to measure new product development (NPD) success factors in the Thai food industry.

Design/methodology/approach

The quantitative research was designed based upon previous qualitative analysis by Suwannaporn and Speece. A total of 114 questionnaires sent to medium and large food companies were returned (17.5 percent of companies).

Findings

Managers' perceptions of the important success factors differ by job function, so that data about what is important cannot distinguish higher vs lower success rates. Manager perceptions of what factors are important do not match actual practice very closely, but they do report what is actually done in the NPD process consistently. Reported practices can distinguish success rates. Discriminant analysis shows that the use of marketing research is most critical in this industry. Internal communication in the NPD process and supplier linkages are also predictors of success rate, and strategy and planning plays a weak role.

Practical implications

NPD is context‐specific. The food industry is strongly market‐driven, so rapid adaptation to customers is critical. Strategy and planning is less important than an ability to remain flexible and move quickly in response changing consumer tastes. Most local companies have strong business secrecy, which is likely to inhibit collaborative research and development (R&D). However, supplier linkages do contribute in distinguishing companies with higher vs lower success rates.

Originality/value

This paper demonstrates that what managers involved in the NPD process believe to be the important success factors cannot always predict NP success rates.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 112 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 13 June 2008

Prisana Suwannaporn, Anita Linnemann and Ravipim Chaveesuk

Rice consumption per capita in many Asian countries is decreasing constantly, but American and European citizens are eating more rice nowadays. A preference study among…

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2956

Abstract

Purpose

Rice consumption per capita in many Asian countries is decreasing constantly, but American and European citizens are eating more rice nowadays. A preference study among consumers was carried out with the aim of determining new rice product characteristics in order to support export of Thai rice. This paper aims to report the results

Design/methodology/approach

The research was based on both secondary and primary data collection. The secondary data included exploratory surveys of rice and its products which were conducted in some of Thailand's potential rice export markets. Exploratory primary data were collected through qualitative focus group research. A quantitative questionnaire with 1,128 consumers of target nationalities was conducted to access consumer attitudes and preferences with respect to rice and rice products.

Findings

Rice products were grouped with factor analysis and could be characterized by convenience (explained variance 33.9 per cent), grain variety (21.2 per cent), and tradition/naturalness (12.8 per cent). Rotated factor score plot of the preference for rice products among different nationalities showed a similarity in the preference for the tradition/natural products. Convenient products were preferred in higher income Asian countries and the non‐rice eating countries. These three product categories were correlated with consumers' ideas concerning the health‐supporting character of processed food.

Originality/value

Consumers' rice preferences differed greatly among nationalities. Rice exporters have to understand these different preferences in order to offer the right products to their customers. Assuming consumer preferences to be comparable to one's own country's preference can cause new product failure. This paper confirms existing differences and presents details and backgrounds of these differences.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 110 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 13 July 2015

Prisana Suwannaporn, Richard Frank Tester, Farage H. Al-Ghazzewi and Paponpat Artitdit

– This paper aims to evaluate the effect of depolymerised glucomannan in regulating blood lipid and glucose concentrations.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to evaluate the effect of depolymerised glucomannan in regulating blood lipid and glucose concentrations.

Design/methodology/approach

Twenty adult volunteers were recruited. Blood samples were taken at Day 0. The volunteers consumed drinks containing 3.0 g active glucomannan hydrolysates (AMH) for 14 days, after which time blood samples were retaken (Day 15). Blood samples were analysed to determine the blood lipid and glucose concentrations.

Findings

The average fasting blood glucose at the start of the trial was 2.54 mmol/L but reduced slightly to 2.49 mmol/L after consumption of the glucomannan. The total average cholesterol at the start of the trial was higher (6.69 mmol/L) than desirable ( < 5.0 mmol/L). This was reduced after consuming the glucomannan to 6.44 mmol/L (3.74 per cent). The triglyceride content was also higher initially than recommended (2.88 mmol/L) but was reduced by 11.5 per cent. The high-density lipoprotein (HDL) was within the desirable range before and after consumption (1.57 and 1.52 mmol/L, respectively), while the average low-density lipoprotein (LDL) was higher than recommended ( < 3.0 mmol/L), representing 4.55 mmol/L and 4.40 mmol/L before and after consumption, respectively. Both parameters were reduced by over 3.0 per cent. The consumption of the glucomannan hydrolysates also reduced the total cholesterol/HDL and LDL/HDL ratios.

Originality/value

The AMH was effective in lowering blood cholesterol and glucose concentrations. Consumption of such carbohydrates could prove useful for these physiological disorders. Further studies are desirable to characterise the exact mechanism.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 45 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2000

Prisana Suwannaporn and Mark Speece

New product development (NPD) in food‐processing industries is often one element which determines whether companies are able to remain competitive in rapidly changing…

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3076

Abstract

New product development (NPD) in food‐processing industries is often one element which determines whether companies are able to remain competitive in rapidly changing consumer markets. Current research suggests that well‐managed NPD should be organized as a continuous learning process. It should have strong information linkage across functions and outside the company to suppliers and customers. We examine NPD in Thailand’s food‐processing industry to determine how much it conforms (or not) to current thinking. Generally, only some multinationals and a few larger Thai companies make some attempt to integrate information from a wide knowledge base into their NPD. Even the ones that do it well by Thai standards still have some problems. Existing models of NPD are not very explicit on how information flows should be structured. From our examination of NPD in Thailand, we propose a model based on the continuous learning process in NPD. It suggests how to accumulate and integrate learning (about customers, technology, and NPD itself) across key internal functions (marketing, R&D and manufacturing).

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 102 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 22 March 2013

Phornsinee Sakchareonkeat, Tzou‐Chi Huang, Prisana Suwannaporn, Yu Hsuan Chiang, Jue Liang Hsu and Yong Han Hong

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of alginate as a vehicle to protect coenzyme Q10 in liposomes.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of alginate as a vehicle to protect coenzyme Q10 in liposomes.

Design/methodology/approach

Encapsulation efficiency and stability were conducted at varying temperatures (20, 30, 40°C) for 5 d and at exposure to simulated gastric conditions (pH 2) for 2 h. The content of coenzyme Q10 was determined using HPLC (LC/MS). Cytotoxicity and phagocytosis of mouse macrophages (RAW264.7) was determined.

Findings

Results showed that thermostability was strongly improved by alginate complex formation with liposomes. Moreover, alginate could maintain coenzyme Q10 at a significantly higher level in simulated gastric pH for at least 2 h (p<0.00).

Practical implications

This allowed a higher amount of coenzyme Q10 remaining to be absorbed in the small intestine. Alginate not only showed no toxic effect on mouse macrophages but also activated their proliferation and phagocytosis ability.

Originality/value

As a consequence, alginate could be applied as an aid to encapsulation stability and immunostimulating potency.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 43 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 5 January 2015

Tunyarut Jinkarn and Prisana Suwannaporn

– The purpose of this paper is to understand consumer perspectives and trade-offs on packaging convenience attributes of various food and drink packages vs increased cost.

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2790

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand consumer perspectives and trade-offs on packaging convenience attributes of various food and drink packages vs increased cost.

Design/methodology/approach

The research utilized structured interviews to collect pertinent data. Personal interviews were conducted at major supermarkets within Bangkok and the vicinity. During data collection, 600 interviews were concluded. Target groups were composed of those who are major shoppers of particular food and drink products. In total, three packages for food products and two packages for drink products were selected for the study, including snack pouches, tuna cans, ready-to-eat plastic trays, laminated juice cartons, and plastic bottles for drinking water. Packaging attributes that were taken into consideration were structure, body style, opening mechanism, reseal features, and tamper-evident characteristics. Part worth analysis and importance level of increased price factors compared with packaging attributes were discussed. Conjoint analysis was used for importance score calculation and data analysis.

Findings

The most important packaging attributes for all packages were the opening characteristics. Tamper-evident characteristics were also perceived as very important for drinking water bottles. However, for all packages, the importance score level for the price factor accounted for only 10-19 percent. As a result, opening characteristics of the packages seemed to influence consumer purchasing decisions for food and drink products; most consumers were happy to trade-off on a slight increase in price for additional convenience or tamper-evident features of a package.

Originality/value

The findings of this study can be used in making strategic packaging decisions to improve customer satisfaction and increase sales.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 117 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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