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Article
Publication date: 15 February 2008

Shahneel Baray, Shafqat Hameed and Atta Badii

This paper's purpose is to examine the impact of ERP adoption in one of the most traditional sectors, namely the printing industry, within a case study of five typical…

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2700

Abstract

Purpose

This paper's purpose is to examine the impact of ERP adoption in one of the most traditional sectors, namely the printing industry, within a case study of five typical large‐scale printing organisations set in the developing economy context of Pakistan.

Design/methodology/approach

The research methodology and the analysis motivated an interpretive approach. The inductive reasoning approach has been used, since the aim was to find something new for the printing industry and to try to discover the advantages that ERP could bring about for the industry. In this research study, semi‐structured interviews were conducted along with a number of visits to the targeted printing firms selected as being prototypical of the sector in this business environment. The research questions focused on identifying and exploring the benefits related to ERP for the printing industry, and why it was needed.

Findings

The research shows that all the functional categories identified in the literature for ERP can be introduced in the printing industry. However, within each category, not all its modules can be adopted for this industry. The research has also shown that the benefits of some areas of ERP are still to be understood by the stakeholders.

Practical implications

The enterprises under study now have an opportunity to look into ERP solutions as the basis also for first‐mover advantage within their sector.

Originality/value

There has been one previous attempt in Pakistan to restructure the largest printing press by introducing SAP, which failed due to lack of technical expertise and training support. This paper draws on the successful approaches deployed in ERP implementations in other sectors and examines the extent to which they can be adapted for the printing industry, for example which modules should be prioritised for integration and how to optimise their impact.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

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Book part
Publication date: 27 August 2014

Thomas Mejtoft

For several hundreds of years printing has been the only effective channel for spreading mass communication. During the 1900s several new media channels have been invented…

Abstract

For several hundreds of years printing has been the only effective channel for spreading mass communication. During the 1900s several new media channels have been invented and, with the addition of the Internet, this has both changed the way media is consumed and has increased the competition between different channels. This qualitative case study of 37 firms reports on how relationships are used in the printing industry to relieve some of the impact of the competitive forces from new, and easily accessible, media as a means for marketing and, furthermore, on the impact on the printing industry as an industry. The results from the case study show that there are both internal and external effects of forming relationships and those vertical, as well as horizontal, relationships are of great importance to create a sustainable competitive situation for the printing industry. Relationships are used to increase both the strategic flexibility of the firm and the flexibility of the print media channel. Furthermore, the study illustrates that the printing industry, and print as a medium of communication, is drifting gradually away from the actual customer due to the new paradigm of value creation.

Details

Field Guide to Case Study Research in Business-to-business Marketing and Purchasing
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-080-3

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Article
Publication date: 8 January 2018

Chi On Chan and Huay Ling Tay

The purpose of this paper is to highlight the lessons learned from two kaizen events for productivity improvement in a printing company. The paper suggests how to organize…

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1724

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to highlight the lessons learned from two kaizen events for productivity improvement in a printing company. The paper suggests how to organize lean tools to improve productivity through the use of organized kaizen events in the printing industry to meet defined targets.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based on a field study involving participant observations. The relationships among the three specific tools, line balancing, standardized work and standardized layout that are used in a kaizen event of a printing factory, are examined.

Findings

Application of a mix of lean tools resulted in significant productivity improvements of 10-30 percent in the assembly area of the printing company. Based on the outcomes of the lean tools that are applied in various work areas, the best combinations of lean tools are identified and several key considerations are discussed.

Practical implications

This paper shows that a combined set of lean tools such as line balancing, standardized work and standardized layout can be applied to improve productivity in the printing operations, which is identifiable with a mix of processes that are both labor intensive and equipment flexible.

Originality/value

The paper fills the literature gap on the use of specific lean tools: line balancing, standardized work and standardized layout in the printing industry. The findings from this research can be applied to other assembly systems that are similar to the printing industry.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 67 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

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Article
Publication date: 20 September 2021

Galina Berjozkina and Rasoul Karami

The paper aims to explore the potential for using 3D printing technology as a more sustainable tool in various areas of the tourism and hospitality industry in Cyprus.

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to explore the potential for using 3D printing technology as a more sustainable tool in various areas of the tourism and hospitality industry in Cyprus.

Design/methodology/approach

For the purpose of this study, qualitative research was conducted to explore the potential for 3D printing technology deployment in Cyprus and specifically in tourism and hospitality settings. Interviews were conducted with industry professionals and practitioners using a snowball sampling method.

Findings

The tourism and hospitality industry currently uses 3D printing technology mainly to assist with the restoration of cultural heritage, sites but there is significant potential to implement 3D printing more widely in support of other building work, souvenirs and food items.

Originality/value

The paper explores current applications and the wider potential for using 3D technology in building, restoration of cultural heritage, souvenirs and food-related printing that together could contribute to a more sustainable tourism and hospitality industry in Cyprus.

Details

Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, vol. 13 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4217

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Article
Publication date: 22 February 2008

Sandra Rothenberg, Ron Hira and Zhi Tang

This paper aims to report on how US printers perceive offshoring trends in the printing industry, and explore how they are responding to its opportunities and challenges.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to report on how US printers perceive offshoring trends in the printing industry, and explore how they are responding to its opportunities and challenges.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors relied on data collection comprising three stages: exploratory interviews, an industry survey, and follow‐up interviews.

Findings

Many printers perceive offshoring as a threat, and some groups are being affected by it. Firms that offer quick and variable printing and/or non‐standard IT services (with the exception of data management) are less likely to suffer from job loss due to the offshoring. To respond to the threat of offshore outsourcing, printers are trying to either focus on “safe” products, introduce new services, or offshore themselves. Most US printers do not have a global footprint, so few have taken advantage of the opportunities opened up by globalization, by offshoring their supply chain or selling abroad.

Research limitations/implications

Due to a low response rate, performance data are not in the analysis. This limitation is common for researchers of the printing industry where little public data are available.

Practical implications

While many US printers are feeling the negative effects of offshoring, few are taking advantage of its benefits.

Originality/value

Most offshoring studies to date have relied on publicly available data, which has significant limitations. This study uses a mix of both survey and interview data to attain a more nuanced view of how the US printing industry is being affected by, and responding, to offshoring.

Details

Strategic Outsourcing: An International Journal, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8297

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Abstract

Details

3D Printing Cultures, Politics and Hackerspaces
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-665-0

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1997

Margaret Tan and Thompson Teo

Information technology (IT) is a powerful communication and computing tool in today’s business environment. The role of IT in shaping business operations is a crucial one…

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1551

Abstract

Information technology (IT) is a powerful communication and computing tool in today’s business environment. The role of IT in shaping business operations is a crucial one. IT can redesign and transform a low technology industry into a high technology industry. The printing and publishing industry is one such case. Two local printing companies in Singapore, namely Superskill Graphics and Xpress Print, had won the national IT awards in 1990 and 1994 respectively for their innovative use of IT. Aims to examine how both companies deploy IT to transform their printing processes from a low technology, labour‐intensive environment with local clientele in the 1970s to a high technology environment with global clientele in the 1990s.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1975

This article on training opportunities in the printing industry has been prepared by the British Printing Industries Federation.

Abstract

This article on training opportunities in the printing industry has been prepared by the British Printing Industries Federation.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 17 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 7 November 2016

Helen Rogers, Norbert Baricz and Kulwant S. Pawar

The purpose of this paper is to identify and classify the available types of 3D printing services, with the scope of determining the potential implications that such…

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6220

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify and classify the available types of 3D printing services, with the scope of determining the potential implications that such services could have on the supply chains of manufacturing firms and creating a research agenda for future studies.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors review the current literature on the potential supply chain impacts of 3D printing and evaluate the 3D printing services provided by 404 firms in selected European markets.

Findings

The results show that 3D printing services form a rapidly evolving industry, with new service providers entering the market on a regular basis. Evidence from the European markets investigated suggests that services can be classified into three distinct categories: generative, facilitative and selective services.

Research limitations/implications

This paper represents an attempt to take stock of a fast-moving and potentially paradigm-shifting market. The implications are dynamic as new applications, business models and techniques are continually being developed. Further studies are required to substantiate the findings.

Practical implications

Three categories of 3D printing services that could significantly impact supply chain configurations of the future are proposed. Several issues specific to 3D printing services raised in the research agenda require further scrutiny and substantiation before services can reach their full potential.

Originality/value

This paper provides an overview of the growing 3D printing services industry, highlighting how the market might change as additive manufacturing technology matures.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 46 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Jiang‐Liang Hou and Chih‐Hao Huang

Seeks to carry out an empirical study to reveal the business characteristics of the printing industry and to accomplish a quantitative analysis of costs and benefits for…

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6795

Abstract

Purpose

Seeks to carry out an empirical study to reveal the business characteristics of the printing industry and to accomplish a quantitative analysis of costs and benefits for RFID applications in different logistics activities.

Design/methodology/approach

The business operation requirements and RFID acceptance of distinct roles in the printing supply chain are explored via interviews and questionnaires. The printing supply chain is classified into six fundamental models and RFID application scenarios for the six models are also provided.

Findings

The ideal approach for RFID application in the printing supply chain is the item‐tagging mechanism.

Practical implications

The decision maker can refer to the cost and efficiency look‐up tables to quickly evaluate the feasibility for RFID implementation.

Originality/value

This paper provides useful reference information for enterprises to evaluate the RFID implementation in the supply chain.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 106 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

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