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Book part

Sarah Jo Sandefur, Amye R. Warren and Anne Gamble

Project REEL (Resources for Early Educator Learning) was a quasi-experimental, delayed-treatment professional development (PD) design to provide training, coaching, and…

Abstract

Project REEL (Resources for Early Educator Learning) was a quasi-experimental, delayed-treatment professional development (PD) design to provide training, coaching, and materials to 220 early childhood educators (ECEs) in 85 diverse, high-needs settings (family, group, and center-based) across Tennessee. Its two primary goals were to (1) increase the frequency of research-based classroom learning experiences that promote language/literacy, numeracy, and social/emotional development among diverse early learners through training and coaching to ECEs and (2) improve the language/literacy, numeracy, and social/emotional readiness of children in low-income areas through research-based training of ECEs and parents. Even with differences in ECEs’ educational backgrounds and diverse settings, teachers in both treatment groups improved and maintained their knowledge and skills in response to the intervention. Preschool children in two cohorts showed significant improvements in most language and literacy measures over the course of an academic year, and improvements were often beyond that due to maturation (using age-controlled measures). Given the amount of improvement seen across a wide array of measures, there is substantial convergent evidence that the Project REEL PD approach was successful in promoting long-lasting improvements in the practices of ECEs in diverse settings and from diverse backgrounds. This chapter follows the development, implementation, and results of two literacy-related modules (“Print Awareness” and “Book Strategies”) for directors and teachers of three- and four-year-olds. These modules are representative of our training design, with its intensive focus on coaching in the diverse settings, and will provide the most beneficial model for other ECE professional developers to follow.

Details

The Early Childhood Educator Professional Development Grant: Research and Practice
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-280-8

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Article

Raneem AlMindeel and Jorge Tiago Martins

The purpose of this paper is to increase understanding of employee information security awareness in a government sector setting and illuminate the problems that public…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to increase understanding of employee information security awareness in a government sector setting and illuminate the problems that public sector organisations in a developing context face when seeking to establish an information security awareness programme.

Design/methodology/approach

An interpretive research design was followed to develop an empirically enriched understanding of information security awareness perceptions, aspirations, challenges and enablers in the context of Saudi Arabia as a developing country. The study adopts a single-case study approach, including face-to-face interviews with senior employees, as well as document analysis.

Findings

The paper theorises the importance of individual information security awareness, knowledge and behaviour and identifies a number of facilitating conditions: customisation to employee and organisational needs, interactivity, innovation, frequency, integration of both electronic and physical learning resources and rewarding the acquisition of in-depth security-related actionable knowledge.

Originality/value

This study is one of the first to examine information security awareness as a socio-technical process within a government sector organisation in a developing country context.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 34 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Book part

Emily Rodgers

Purpose – This chapter describes an assessment tool that not only contains all of the good qualities of formative assessments, in that it informs teaching and is based on…

Abstract

Purpose – This chapter describes an assessment tool that not only contains all of the good qualities of formative assessments, in that it informs teaching and is based on systematic observation of the learner engaged in reading and writing, but also possesses the same good qualities as standardized assessments, in that a student's performance can be compared to other students over time.

Methodology/approach – The chapter begins with an overview of Clay's interactive literacy processing theory. The value of using observation is discussed and a case is made that when observations are conducted in a systematic way, the assessment can possess all the same qualities of a good standardized instrument. Two first-grade students' assessment data from the Observation Survey (OS), one a struggling reader and the other working at low-average level, are shared in order to demonstrate how to interpret the assessment data using Clay's literacy processing theory and how to use those interpretations to inform teaching.

Practical implications – Systematic observation of children engaged in reading, and writing continuous text, allows the teacher to observe behaviors that can be used to infer what a reader is using and doing while reading.

Value – This assessment information can be used to effectively scaffold literacy instruction and a child's reading performance.

Details

Using Informative Assessments towards Effective Literacy Instruction
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-630-0

Keywords

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Article

Cathy Nutbrown, Julia Bishop and Helen Wheeler

– The purpose of this paper is to report on how early years practitioners worked with the ORIM Framework to support work with parents to promote early literacy experiences.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report on how early years practitioners worked with the ORIM Framework to support work with parents to promote early literacy experiences.

Design/methodology/approach

Co-produced Knowledge Exchange (KE) was used to develop and evaluate work with parents to facilitate their young children’s literacy. Information was gathered in discussion groups, interviews with parents and practitioners and feedback from all the parties involved.

Findings

Practitioners and families engaged with each other in the further development of an established literacy programme, and families demonstrated “ownership” of the co-produced knowledge after the end of the project.

Research limitations/implications

Project design in co-produced research and KE is necessarily flexible. The focus is on practitioners’ knowledge and ownership of the process, sharing knowledge with parents and enhancing children’s experiences.

Practical implications

Practices that can enhance parental engagement in their children’s early literacy are varied and multiple and ORIM can be used flexibly to plan, develop and evaluate innovative and community – (and family –) specific practices.

Social implications

Where parents have more knowledge of children’s early literacy development they are in a better position to support them; for learning communities there are implications in terms of future development of work with families to support early literacy development.

Originality/value

This paper contributes an original approach to the co-production of research with early years practitioners. It also identifies specific issues around the ethics of ownership in co-produced research.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

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Book part

Michael L. Kamil

This chapter reviews some of the important factors in the professional development of teachers of young children. It discusses how important teacher quality is for student…

Abstract

This chapter reviews some of the important factors in the professional development of teachers of young children. It discusses how important teacher quality is for student outcomes. The chapter also discusses the many factors that go into the development of quality teachers. This chapter also introduces the history of the Early Childhood Educator Professional Development program financed through grants from the United States Department of Education. This program has focused on creating state of the art professional development programs across many U.S. contexts.

Details

The Early Childhood Educator Professional Development Grant: Research and Practice
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-280-8

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Article

Stephanie Ellis, Stephann Makri and Simon Attfield

The authors wanted to provide an enriched understanding of how lawyers keep up-to-date with legal developments. Maintaining awareness of developments in an area (known as…

Abstract

Purpose

The authors wanted to provide an enriched understanding of how lawyers keep up-to-date with legal developments. Maintaining awareness of developments in an area (known as “monitoring”) is an important aspect of professional’s information work. This is particularly true for lawyers, who are expected to keep up-to-date with legal developments on an ongoing basis.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted semi-structured interviews with a group of lawyers who authored and published current awareness content for LexisNexis – a large publishing organisation. The interviews focused on identifying the types of electronic, printed and people-based current awareness resources the lawyers used to keep up-to-date with legal developments and the reasons for their choices.

Findings

The lawyers mostly used electronic resources (particularly e-mail alerts and an electronic tool that alerted them to changes in website content), alongside interpersonal sources, such as colleagues, customers and professional contacts. Printed media, such as journals and newspapers, were used more rarely and usually to complement electronic and person-based resources. A number of factors were found to influence choice. These included situational relevance, presentation, utility and trustworthiness, the speed of content acquisition and interpretation facilitated by the resource.

Originality/value

The authors' findings enrich their understanding of lawyers’ monitoring behaviour, which has so far received little direct research attention. Their design suggestions have the potential to feed into the design of new and improvement of existing digital current awareness resources. Their findings have the potential to act as “success criteria” by which these resources can be evaluated from a user-centred perspective.

Details

New Library World, vol. 115 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article

Trang Thi Huynh and Cuc Hong Lam

This study aims to investigate the rate of print material deterioration at the Learning Resource Center – a university at the Mekong Delta and identify users’ behaviors…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the rate of print material deterioration at the Learning Resource Center – a university at the Mekong Delta and identify users’ behaviors that may harm library materials, thereby presenting some potential solutions to enhance librarianship students’ awareness of preservation.

Design/methodology/approach

The research is based on Walker’s (2003) conceptual framework of preservation and that of education and propaganda from awareness development. Using a quantitative approach, 25-item questionnaire was delivered to 133 sophomores and seniors and analyzed by SPSS software. Qualitative data from the open-ended question were recorded and analyzed by themes.

Findings

The findings from this study show that the rate of print material deterioration at the Learning Resource Center was relatively low compared to that of other libraries in the nation and in the world. In addition, students’ knowledge about how to make the photocopies, as well as how much to open the book, is limited. The most important reason is because of lack of education from school and the library. The research also proposed some effective and realizable solutions to enhance librarianship students’ awareness of preservation of the materials at Learning Resource Center of a Mekong Delta university, Vietnam.

Practical implications

This research provides library staff and users, especially librarianship students, with an awareness of the important role of book preservation, human behavior of library collections and potential preventive ways of book damage. This study also specifies evidence that library lecturers should include ethical issues in their lectures because librarianship students still have limited knowledge of book preservation. By doing so, these actions may motivate librarianship students to continue to learn and apply their knowledge of preservation into library materials and their own documents. Furthermore, the finding of the library work punishment contributes to better understanding of library labor force and students’ personality education. The findings can serve as a reference to educating other users in Vietnam and globally.

Originality/value

The level of print material deterioration at the Learning Resource Center of a Mekong Delta university, Vietnam and library work punishment were observed to be the most important findings with regard to library preservation in a particular library in Southeast Asian country. These findings provide insights into students’ awareness of preservation, not yet discussed in the literature.

Details

Information and Learning Science, vol. 119 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-5348

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Article

Douglas Aghimien, Clinton Aigbavboa, Lerato Aghimien, Wellington D. Thwala and Lebu Ndlovu

Considering the need for standard and cost-effective housing delivery in South Africa, this study aims to make a case for three-dimensional (3D) printing in housing…

Abstract

Purpose

Considering the need for standard and cost-effective housing delivery in South Africa, this study aims to make a case for three-dimensional (3D) printing in housing delivery through an assessment of the inherent benefits and the factors that could acts as barriers to its adoption.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used a survey of construction professionals currently actively involved in a construction project in the country. Analysis of data gathered was done using a four-step analysis approach and relevant descriptive and inferential statistics were adopted.

Findings

The study revealed through factor analysis that 3D printing in housing delivery promises better cost delivery, increased productivity and stakeholder satisfaction, socio-economic benefits, improved quality and faster housing delivery. While these benefits exist, factors such as technical and operational issues of the 3D printing itself, organizational and personnel issues as well as lack of awareness of the inherent benefits and understanding of the technology among stakeholders can prove to be barriers to the adoption of the technology.

Practical implications

In the quest to achieve standard and affordable housing which is part of its National Development Plan 2030, the government can adopt 3D printing which promises significant benefits in terms of cost, time, quality, productivity and stakeholders’ satisfaction. Property developers can also adopt the technology to improve their housing delivery, competitive advantage and the economic value of their properties.

Originality/value

The study contributes significantly to the body of knowledge as it reveals the benefits and barriers of adopting 3D printing in housing delivery in South Africa – an aspect that has not gained significant attention in the fourth industrial revolution and housing delivery discuss in the country.

Details

International Journal of Housing Markets and Analysis, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8270

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Book part

Evan Ortlieb, Earl H. Cheek, Erica Bowers and Gerlinde Grandstaff-Beckers

Purpose – To provide classroom teachers with an overview of a range of assessments that can be administered either individually or to a group.Design/methodology/approach …

Abstract

Purpose – To provide classroom teachers with an overview of a range of assessments that can be administered either individually or to a group.

Design/methodology/approach – The chapter is organized from early literacy skill assessments (both individual and group based) to comprehension and standardized tests.

Findings – Provides detailed information on skills required for each element of reading, design of assessment, intended purpose, and process of administration.

Research limitations/implications – This is not an exhaustive list, the authors strove to highlight the most reliable and practical assessments from a large body of possible choices.

Practical implications – This is a valuable source for classroom teachers who are provided with a wide-range of assessment choices covering the breadth of reading skills with extensive details on each.

Originality/value of paper – Teachers need a range of assessments to choose from to make decisions at the individual, class and school level.

Details

Using Informative Assessments towards Effective Literacy Instruction
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-630-0

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Article

Samuel C. Avemaria Utulu and Omolara Bolarinwa

The purpose of this paper is to examine Nigerian academics' adoption of open access initiatives as authors and readers of scholarly resources. The study was necessitated…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine Nigerian academics' adoption of open access initiatives as authors and readers of scholarly resources. The study was necessitated by the growing need to have the number of Nigerian scholarly publications increased on the internet and accessible to scholars around the world through the use of open access initiatives.

Design/methodology/approach

Academics of two first generation Nigerian universities selected using convenient sampling technique were surveyed using the questionnaire to find out the extent of their awareness and use of open access initiatives as authors and readers of scholarly works. Two hundred and fifty questionnaire copies were distributed in the two universities out of which 189 copies were returned, while 180 copies were found to be useable for the study.

Findings

It was revealed that the respondents were aware of the pre‐print and open access journal initiatives than the post‐print initiative. In terms of the use of open access initiatives, although the study revealed insignificant use among the academics, academics in sciences showed more promise of adopting open access initiative as authors and readers of scholarly resources than their counterparts in the humanities.

Research limitations/implications

Unlike studies that assessed specific subject based and institutional repositories that allowed for the search and extraction of depositors' names and characteristics, this particular study relied on respondents' responses as a source of their actual use of open access repositories.

Originality/value

This paper reveals that academics' perception and publishing culture, and not awareness, determines the extent of their use of open access initiatives in Nigeria.

Details

Library Review, vol. 58 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

Keywords

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