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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2003

Jon Katzenbach

Every great company is distinguished by special attitudes of its employees. For example, Microsoft, Southwest Airlines, Marriott and other leaders elicit superior…

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Abstract

Every great company is distinguished by special attitudes of its employees. For example, Microsoft, Southwest Airlines, Marriott and other leaders elicit superior commitment from their people, and use it to sustain innovation and overall excellence. Such companies have found that pride is more powerful than money. It is what motivates people to form emotional attachments. Intrinsic pride – the kind that comes from the emotional high of having done a job well – is the most lasting and powerful motivating force, especially at the front‐line of an organization. There are management approaches and disciplines that can create this kind of pride, and can be used to drive organizations to higher levels of performance. This article, by management thought leader Jon Katzenbach, formerly of McKinsey & Co. and now founder and senior partner of Katzenbach Partners LLC, provides a blueprint for how to make pride a strategic asset.

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 31 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 October 2022

Jinfeng (Jenny) Jiao, Catherine Cole and Gary Gaeth

Pride is an emotional response to success or achievement with two facets, AP and HP. This study aims to address an unanswered question: how does each type of pride affect…

Abstract

Purpose

Pride is an emotional response to success or achievement with two facets, AP and HP. This study aims to address an unanswered question: how does each type of pride affect indulgence when consumers engage in relatively thoughtful processing (System II) versus when they engage in rapid and more superficial processing (System I).

Design/methodology/approach

Using four experiments, this research investigates the effects of pride and cognitive resources on indulgence. This study also tests the mediating roles of deservedness and self-esteem using an ANOVA, a bootstrap analysis and a binary logistic-regression analysis.

Findings

The results show that cognitive resources moderate the effects of AP and HP on indulgence. When consumers have ample cognitive resources, AP leads to more indulgence than HP. When consumers have restricted cognitive resources and engage a quick, affective-based processing system, HP leads to greater indulgence than AP.

Research limitations/implications

This research enhances understanding of the impact of two kinds of pride on indulgence and advances the authors’ understanding in the broader area linking emotion and consumer decision-making.

Practical implications

Marketers and public policymakers need to understand the differences between AP and HP because they have potentially different impacts on consumer behavior. Depending on whether companies are trying to motivate consumers to indulge or to restrain from indulging, companies can successfully incorporate AP or HP into their marketing communications.

Originality/value

The key contribution of this research is that the authors show that both AP and HP can lead to indulgence, depending on the amount of cognitive attention that is allocated to the decision and, therefore, which system consumers deploy.

Book part
Publication date: 16 July 2018

Shane Connelly and Brett S. Torrence

Organizational behavior scholars have long recognized the importance of a variety of emotion-related phenomena in everyday work life. Indeed, after three decades, the span…

Abstract

Organizational behavior scholars have long recognized the importance of a variety of emotion-related phenomena in everyday work life. Indeed, after three decades, the span of research on emotions in the workplace encompasses a wide variety of affective variables such as emotional climate, emotional labor, emotion regulation, positive and negative affect, empathy, and more recently, specific emotions. Emotions operate in complex ways across multiple levels of analysis (i.e., within-person, between-person, interpersonal, group, and organizational) to exert influence on work behavior and outcomes, but their linkages to human resource management (HRM) policies and practices have not always been explicit or well understood. This chapter offers a review and integration of the bourgeoning research on discrete positive and negative emotions, offering insights about why these emotions are relevant to HRM policies and practices. We review some of the dominant theories that have emerged out of functionalist perspectives on emotions, connecting these to a strategic HRM framework. We then define and describe four discrete positive and negative emotions (fear, pride, guilt, and interest) highlighting how they relate to five HRM practices: (1) selection, (2) training/learning, (3) performance management, (4) incentives/rewards, and (5) employee voice. Following this, we discuss the emotion perception and regulation implications of these and other discrete emotions for leaders and HRM managers. We conclude with some challenges associated with understanding discrete emotions in organizations as well as some opportunities and future directions for improving our appreciation and understanding of the role of discrete emotional experiences in HRM.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-322-3

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Article
Publication date: 13 June 2022

Cecilia Souto Maior, Danielle Mantovani, Diego Costa Pinto and Mário Boto Ferreira

Earlier research indicates that brand choices may display different identity signals, such as altruism and benevolence for green brands or high status and exclusiveness…

Abstract

Purpose

Earlier research indicates that brand choices may display different identity signals, such as altruism and benevolence for green brands or high status and exclusiveness for premium brands. This research adds to the literature by exploring how opting for green (vs premium) brands leads consumers to feel authentic (vs hubristic) pride.

Design/methodology/approach

Three experimental studies were conducted to test the hypotheses related to green versus premium choices (Studies 1–3), public accountability (Study 2) and the underlying process of anticipated judgment (Study 3).

Findings

The findings reveal that choosing a green (vs premium) brand results in higher authentic pride and lower hubristic pride. However, the green pride effects were only observed when consumers' brand choices were publicly accountable. Finally, anticipated judgment mediates changes in authentic pride driven by green (vs premium) brands.

Originality/value

The study findings contribute preponderantly to the green consumer behavior literature and practice by providing primary evidence that green (vs premium) branding can trigger distinct patterns of pride in comparative decisions.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 40 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 5 July 2022

Harleen Kaur and Harsh V. Verma

The study aims to synthesize the state of research on pride in consumer behaviour and marketing. Specifically, this study aims to understand the emergent themes of…

Abstract

Purpose

The study aims to synthesize the state of research on pride in consumer behaviour and marketing. Specifically, this study aims to understand the emergent themes of literature, the key theories, analytical techniques and methodologies used, as well as key variables associated with pride in consumer behaviour and marketing.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a systematic literature review process, the study analyses 59 research articles and structures its findings by using the theory–context–characteristics–methodology framework.

Findings

The review proposes a taxonomical classification of the multiple conceptualizations of pride. It identifies that the phenomenon and regulation of pride is explained using theories from psychological self-related research. Pride has been experienced in sustainable, advertising, luxury and digital consumption contexts. Reviewed articles showed an over-reliance on the quantitative methodology and the experimental method. The review identifies that pride is associated with positive outcomes and has considerable influence on consumer behaviour. Building on this analysis, 12 research questions are developed to encourage future research.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this study is the first structured review on the emotion of pride in the domains of consumer behaviour and marketing.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

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Article
Publication date: 23 December 2021

Myat Su Han, Daniel Peter Hampson and Yonggui Wang

This study aims to investigate whether or not the two facets of pride, hubristic and authentic, are associated with knowledge hiding.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate whether or not the two facets of pride, hubristic and authentic, are associated with knowledge hiding.

Design/methodology/approach

This study collects survey data (N = 343) from one of the leading information technology (IT) companies in Myanmar at two stages with a two-month interval. This study uses multiple regression analyses to test this study’s hypotheses.

Findings

Results reveal that hubristic pride is positively related to knowledge hiding, whereas the relationship between authentic pride and knowledge hiding is negative. These relationships are contingent upon the level of employees’ self-efficacy.

Research limitations/implications

This study suggests that managers should include measures for moral emotions in their recruitment and selection criteria. Furthermore, the authors suggest that managers should design strategies to induce moral emotions at the workplace and enhance personal resources (e.g. self-efficacy), which have an instrumental effect in maximizing the prosocial facet of pride (i.e. authentic pride) as well as minimizing adverse experiences of the antisocial facet of pride (i.e. hubristic pride), thereby reducing knowledge hiding.

Originality/value

The findings shed light on the significance of the inclusion of emotional variables in understanding employees’ knowledge hiding. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this study is the first empirical study to examine the combined effect of emotive and cognitive variables in predicting knowledge hiding by demonstrating that hubristic pride only mitigates knowledge hiding behavior among high self-efficacious employees.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 26 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 January 2022

Fei Kang, Jiyu Li and Yuanyuan Hua

Many studies have examined the positive outcomes of humble leadership for employees. However, its impact on newcomers' well-being has been rarely investigated. In this…

Abstract

Purpose

Many studies have examined the positive outcomes of humble leadership for employees. However, its impact on newcomers' well-being has been rarely investigated. In this paper, based on affective events theory and the broaden-and-build theory of positive emotions, the authors proposed a moderated mediation model to explore the effect of humble leadership on newcomer well-being. In the model, we identified newcomers' pride as a mediating variable and newcomers' proactive personality as a moderating variable.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were from a two-wave sample containing 213 newcomers. The hypothesized model was tested using partial least squares structural equational modeling.

Findings

The results demonstrated that humble leadership was positively related to newcomers' well-being, and newcomers' pride medicated this relationship. Additionally, newcomers' proactive personality moderated the relationship between humble leadership and newcomers' pride.

Research limitations/implications

The authors adopted a cross-sectional research design, rendering it difficult to derive causal relationships between variables. In addition, all data were from self-reports of newcomers which would suffer from common method variance.

Originality/value

This research examined the role of humble leadership in promoting newcomers' pride and well-being.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 August 2021

Martin Yongho Hyun, Lisa Gao and Seoki Lee

This study aims to develop a theoretical framework that specifies how corporate social responsibility (CSR) and ethical climate (ETHIC) affect pride in membership (PRIDE)…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to develop a theoretical framework that specifies how corporate social responsibility (CSR) and ethical climate (ETHIC) affect pride in membership (PRIDE), and in turn, attitudinal responses (i.e. job satisfaction and turnover intention) among employees, solely focusing on dealers in the casino industry. In addition, the moderating role of customer orientation is examined for internally motivated enjoyment (ENJOY) and externally motivated needs (NEED).

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a non-probability convenience-sampling method by distributing 400 individual questionnaires to respondents. A total of 358 responses are used for data analysis using exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses. Furthermore, this study tests the proposed hypotheses using structural equation modeling.

Findings

This study finds the effect of CSR on ETHIC and the effect of ETHIC on PRIDE along with the subsequent effect on attitudinal responses. Findings also reveal a significant moderating role of ENJOY (NEED) on the relationship between ETHIC (CSR) and PRIDE (PRIDE).

Research limitations/implications

This study provides meaningful contributions to extant casino CSR literature, as well as opportunities for future research. The topic may be further explored from cross-cultural perspectives and adapt a methodology to enhance the generalizability and applicability of the findings.

Originality/value

This study attempts to explore the CSR effectiveness on casino dealers, in whom past empirical examination has found little interest. Moreover, according to the multi-experience model, this study investigates the relationships among CSR, ethical climate and pride in membership that have been rarely verified in the past literature. Finally, this study reveals a significant moderating role of ENJOY and NEED that has not been explored, particularly among casino dealers.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 33 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 August 2021

Hee-Kyung Ahn, Seung-Hwa Kim and Wen Ying Ke

This study examines the impact of incidental pride on consumer preference for attention-grabbing products. This effect is mediated by the desire to gain attention. This…

Abstract

Purpose

This study examines the impact of incidental pride on consumer preference for attention-grabbing products. This effect is mediated by the desire to gain attention. This study also shows that the effect of incidental pride is qualified by visibility of consumption.

Design/methodology/approach

Using two studies with between-subjects designs, this research examines the difference in preferences for attention-grabbing products between hubristic and authentic pride.

Findings

Individuals who experience hubristic pride (vs authentic pride) show greater preference for attention-grabbing products and have a strong desire to gain attention from others. However, when consumption is perceived as private (vs public), preferences for attention-grabbing products weaken for those who experience hubristic pride.

Research limitations/implications

This research studies the effect of incidental pride on consumer preference. By examining dispositional pride effects, future research may expand these findings, which enrich the literature on emotion. Future research can identify the potential mechanism for the relationship between authentic pride and preference for attention-grabbing products in the context of private consumption.

Practical implications

Marketers and salespersons can guide and recommend products with attention-grabbing features to customers celebrating a friend’s success in recognition of their innate ability. Second, marketers may encourage consumers to buy attention-grabbing products with targeted advertising or emotion-eliciting advertising (i.e., evoke a certain type of pride).

Originality/value

While prior studies focused on basic emotions, this research has investigated self-conscious emotions that are central to consumer behavior. This research contributes to the understanding of self-conscious emotions that affect consumers’ behavioral responses in unrelated situations. Investigating the two facets of pride, the findings show the impact of pride on the preference for attention-grabbing products and reveals that visibility of consumption moderates the effect of pride.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 55 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 May 2021

Yue Lu, Zhanqing Wang, Defeng Yang and Nakaya Kakuda

Brands are increasingly reflecting social values, and many brands have begun to embrace equality and inclusivity as a marketing strategy. Accordingly, consumers are…

Abstract

Purpose

Brands are increasingly reflecting social values, and many brands have begun to embrace equality and inclusivity as a marketing strategy. Accordingly, consumers are increasingly being exposed to brands associated with different social groups. This paper aims to examine how consumers who have experienced pride respond to brands associated with dissociative out-groups.

Design/methodology/approach

Four studies were conducted. Study 1 tested the basic effect of how the experience of different facets of pride affects consumers’ brand attitudes toward a brand associated with a dissociative out-group. Studies 2 and 3 examined the underlying mechanism of consumers’ psychological endorsement of egalitarianism using both mediation and moderation approaches. Study 4 derived implications of our findings for marketers.

Findings

The results show that consumers respond differently to a brand associated with a dissociative out-group based on the facets of pride they experience. When consumers experience authentic (vs hubristic) pride, they exhibit a more favorable attitude toward the brand associated with the dissociative out-group. This is because authentic (vs hubristic) pride increases consumers’ psychological endorsement of egalitarianism, which enhances consumers’ brand attitudes toward the brand associated with the dissociative out-group.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that brand managers should think about ways to elicit consumers’ authentic pride to minimize the potential backlash from consumers when promoting equality and inclusivity in their brand communications, particularly when such communications contain cues of dissociative out-groups.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the branding literature by identifying pride as an important determinant that can help brands overcome the negative impact of dissociative out-groups on consumers’ brand reactions, enriches the literature on pride by documenting a novel effect of the two facets of pride on consumer behavior and extends the literature of egalitarianism by demonstrating pride as a driver of consumers’ psychological endorsement of egalitarianism.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

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