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Article

Jungsun (Sunny) Kim, Natasa Christodoulidou and Yunjeong (Clara) Choo

This study aims to explore: the impact of customers' previous experience on their likelihood of using kiosks at quick service restaurants (QSRs); a mediating role of…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore: the impact of customers' previous experience on their likelihood of using kiosks at quick service restaurants (QSRs); a mediating role of customer readiness (i.e. role clarity, ability, extrinsic motivation, intrinsic motivation) between customers' previous experience and their likelihood of using kiosks; and a moderating effect of gender in the relationships among customers' previous experience, readiness, and likelihood of using kiosks.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 614 complete responses were obtained through an online survey. Structural equation modeling was developed and tested.

Findings

The results demonstrated that extrinsic motivation in using SSTs directly influenced the likelihood of using kiosks, and previous experience with SSTs indirectly influenced the likelihood of using kiosks through customer readiness in both male and female groups. This study also revealed that both male and female respondents who perceived their roles in using SST more clearly were more likely to use kiosks at QSRs. However, their perceived ability and levels of intrinsic motivations did not significantly influence the likelihood of using kiosks in both groups. Overall, gender did not play a significant moderating role in the relationships among experience, readiness, and likelihood of using kiosks at QSR.

Originality/value

Since very few studies have investigated the kiosks adoption at QSR settings, the findings and suggestions from this study will provide practical insight for QSR operators. Future research could attempt to draw a comprehensive kiosk acceptance model by incorporating the current study's framework with other demographic variables or other antecedent variables.

Details

Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Technology, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-9880

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Article

Mbaye Fall Diallo and Jose Ribamar Siqueira Jr

Brand experience is a key factor that helps elucidate why consumers choose a given brand among others. The purpose this paper is to investigate how previous experience

Abstract

Purpose

Brand experience is a key factor that helps elucidate why consumers choose a given brand among others. The purpose this paper is to investigate how previous experience with store brands affects store brand purchase intention in two emerging markets and whether the cultural context moderates the relationships between store brand positive or negative cues and store brand purchase intention.

Design/methodology/approach

A store-intercept survey undertaken in the Latin American context generated 769 usable responses from consumers of two metropolitan cities (Brasilia and Bogota), respectively, in Brazil and Colombia. The questionnaires were collected in four well-established retail chains by professional investigators. Structural equation modelling was used to test a series of proposed hypotheses.

Findings

Overall, this paper reveals that consumers in Latin America do care about brand experience when shopping. More specifically, the results indicate that previous positive experience with store brands has a positive effect on consumer purchase intention in both countries investigated. In Brazil, store brand price perceptions mediate rather strongly the relationship between previous experience with store brands and purchase intention. In contrast, this effect is weak in Colombia. Store brand perceived risk has significant mediation effects in Brazil, but no mediation effects in Colombia. The authors also underline heterogeneous moderation effects of the cultural context, suggesting that common perceptions of Latin America as a culturally homogeneous region are stereotypical.

Research limitations/implications

Respondents were consumers of only two Latin American emerging countries (Brazil and Colombia) and shoppers of two retail chains in each country. Caution should therefore be exercised when generalising the results to other emerging markets.

Practical implications

The paper offers recommendations on how to standardise/adapt brand experience management in different Latin American markets. Overall, retailers should go beyond the transaction itself and establish true differentiation using different store brand ranges. However, due to differences in cultural contexts, marketing communication should adopt different approaches to each country: emphasise the price advantages of store brands in Brazil, but focus on other factors such as quality in Colombia. Because they are culturally bound, risk perceptions towards store brands should also be managed carefully. It would be possible to target premium consumer segments with standard store brands in Colombia while a more sophisticated approach is necessary in Brazil (e.g. co-branding or launching more premium store brands).

Originality/value

By employing three theoretical frameworks (learning theory, cue utilisation theory and culture theory), this research investigates the effect of previous experience with store brands on purchase intention in two emerging countries that are geographically close but culturally different. It highlights direct and indirect processes of brand experience and underlines significant structural path differences between the two Latin American countries investigated in terms of consumption behaviour towards store brands.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 34 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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Article

Pia Ulvenblad, Eva Berggren and Joakim Winborg

The aim of this study is to test the assumption that ability to handle communication and liability of newness (LoN) is enhanced by academic entrepreneurship education…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study is to test the assumption that ability to handle communication and liability of newness (LoN) is enhanced by academic entrepreneurship education and/or previous start‐up experience.

Design/methodology/approach

The data collection includes a questionnaire with a total sample of 392 responding entrepreneurs in Sweden. Statistical analyses are made between entrepreneurs with academic entrepreneurship education respectively previous start‐up experience.

Findings

The findings show that entrepreneurs with experience from entrepreneurship education report more developed communicative skills in the dimensions of openness as well as adaptation, whereas the dimension of other‐orientation is found to be learned by previous start‐up experience. When it comes to perceived problems related to LoN the differences between the groups were not as strong as assumed. However, the differences observed imply that also for handling LoN the authors identify a combined effect of possessing start‐up experience as well as experience from entrepreneurship education. Consequently, entrepreneurs with experience from both, show in total the most elaborated skills.

Practical implications

One way to improve future entrepreneurship educations is to make students more aware of the mutual profit in a business agreement and how to communicate this in a marketing situation. Another suggestion is to include starting business as a course work.

Originality/value

This study not only meets the call for actual outcome from entrepreneurship educations in terms of changed behaviour but also for interdisciplinary research in the entrepreneurship field in integrating leadership research with focus on communication.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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Article

Jihye Park and Leslie Stoel

The purpose of this study is to examine the effect of brand familiarity, the number of pieces of product information presented on a web site, and previous online apparel…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the effect of brand familiarity, the number of pieces of product information presented on a web site, and previous online apparel shopping experience on perceived risk and purchase intention.

Design/methodology/approach

The experiment was 2 (brand familiarity)×2 (information availability) factorial design and 166 students participated in this study.

Findings

Multivariate and univariate analyses found a significant effect of brand familiarity and previous experience on perceived risk and purchase intention, and no effect of amount of information on perceived risk and purchase intention.

Research limitations/implications

Participants may not have carefully considered the product information because the experiment was not an actual purchase situation, although a scenario was given. In future studies, creating an actual purchase situation may be necessary to investigate the effect of the amount of information available on the web sites on perceived risk and decision making.

Practical implications

The present study suggests that internet retailers should capitalize on the power of their brand names. Multi‐channel retailers may be able to derive significant advantages from brand familiarity among their customers.

Orginality/value

This study has added to the in‐home shopping literature by extending findings of previous research to internet shopping. Findings suggest that internal information, specifically familiarity with brands offered online and previous experience of shopping online, influence perceptions of risk associated with shopping online, as well as intentions to purchase online.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article

Jari Huovinen and Sanna Tihula

Previous research has predominantly focused on the meaning of prior entrepreneurial experience in the context of habitual entrepreneurship. To date, however, little is…

Abstract

Purpose

Previous research has predominantly focused on the meaning of prior entrepreneurial experience in the context of habitual entrepreneurship. To date, however, little is known about how previous experience affects the way in which several firms can be managed simultaneously. The purpose of this study is to examine entrepreneurial learning in the context of portfolio entrepreneurship and clarify how it is possible to manage several firms at the same time.

Design/methodology/approach

An exploratory study using a case method was conducted (Eisenhardt; Yin) by focusing on one portfolio entrepreneur. In this study, the case can be considered as unusual thus being suitable for a single‐case study. Data were collected through interviews and the entrepreneur also provided the researchers with a written description of the development and present situation of his entrepreneurial career.

Findings

This study proposes that failures may develop entrepreneurial knowledge as well as founding experiences. Development of entrepreneurial knowledge is viewed as leading to new ways of organizing and managing start‐up firms. Learning through previous experiences has strengthened entrepreneurial knowledge and contributed to the formation of the management team (MT). Without cooperation, delegation and sharing responsibilities, successful portfolio entrepreneurship would not have been realized. However, the results suggest that learning from failure is dependent on the entrepreneur's personal background.

Originality/value

This study seeks to bring new insight to portfolio entrepreneurship by concentrating on the entrepreneurial career of a well‐known Finnish entrepreneur by following the framework of Politis. In this case, a MT in each firm enabled effective control and management of the current firm portfolio. The study shows that in addition to the entrepreneurial team, the management teams can also have a significant role in the context of portfolio entrepreneurship although they have largely been ignored.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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Article

Florian Kirschenhofer and Christian Lechner

This paper aims to focus on the role of team and entrepreneurial experience for firm performance of serial entrepreneurs in the multi‐media industry.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to focus on the role of team and entrepreneurial experience for firm performance of serial entrepreneurs in the multi‐media industry.

Design/methodology/approach

The research assumes that serial entrepreneurs have certain advantages over novice entrepreneurs, such as the development of effective start‐up teams and entrepreneurial experience effects. Disadvantages, however, are also mentioned in the literature, and these are assumed to out‐balance the advantages, leading to mixed research findings. The hypotheses are tested on a sample of 52 European multimedia companies.

Findings

The results show a positive impact of relevant entrepreneurial experience and evidence both team advantages as well as disadvantages. Team diversity had a positive impact on performance while the extent of repeated partnerships (or relative team stability) had a negative impact on performance. Moreover, entrepreneurial experience helps to build better diverse teams but has no impact on repeated partnerships.

Research limitations/implications

The degree of experience of serial entrepreneurs in the same industry matters, and suggests that more experience is better. The findings challenge a general assumption about serial entrepreneurs: that the building of superior teams creates performance differences. Team diversity drives performance and the study could also show that habitual entrepreneurs are better in building diverse teams (through a positive moderation of team diversity by entrepreneurial experience). However, relying heavily on previous partners is counter‐productive. Limitations of this study are due to self‐reported data, small sample size and survivor bias.

Practical implications

Entrepreneurs need to focus on opportunities and resource needs linked to these opportunities, and use their experience to build stronger teams but to resist the temptation of replicating perceived past success formula by over‐relying on previous partners. The latter is also important for stakeholders in the entrepreneurial venture.

Originality/value

This paper tests various assumptions and propositions about serial entrepreneurship that are rarely based on sound evidence. The role of entrepreneurial experience to build better diverse teams and the role of repeated partnerships constitute an original contribution to habitual entrepreneurship research.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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Article

Beatriz Moliner Velázquez, María Fuentes Blasco, Irene Gil Saura and Gloria Berenguer Contrí

The purpose of this paper is to examine the main causes for complaining behaviour intentions expressed in three dimensions: private response, complaining response and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the main causes for complaining behaviour intentions expressed in three dimensions: private response, complaining response and complaining to third parties. The objectives are, first to study the direct influence of a set of antecedents and complaining behaviour intentions and second, to analyse the moderator effect of previous restaurant experience on subsequent relations.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative research method was used based on a self‐administered ad‐hoc questionnaire on a sample of 388 individuals who remembered an unsatisfactory experience in a restaurant.

Findings

The results show that the following variables have significant effects on intentions: attitudes towards complaining, level of information and complaining experience, level of dissatisfaction and likelihood of success with the complaint. An increased effect of attitudes towards complaining has been found in customers with no previous experience of the restaurant.

Originality/value

This work shows that the customer's previous experience is important in the formation of complaining behaviour intentions and therefore research is needed on new variables which may play a moderator role.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 24 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article

Keshav Kumar Sharma, D. Israel and Bhavna Bhalla

In view of the substantial gaps between desirable and actual competencies of project practitioners, there is a genuine and continual need to improve approaches towards…

Abstract

Purpose

In view of the substantial gaps between desirable and actual competencies of project practitioners, there is a genuine and continual need to improve approaches towards project management education. The purpose of this paper is to empirically examine whether previous work experience of students pursuing a master’s programme in project management plays a role in their understanding and learning from the programme.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data were collected from 282 respondents, who included working project professionals along with first-year (junior) and second-year (senior) students of a two-year postgraduate programme in project management. Considering the responses of working project professionals as the benchmark, the paper employs exploratory factor analysis and multiple comparisons to examine differences in the perceived importance given to factor groupings of critical success factors (CSFs) of construction projects by different respondent groups.

Findings

Results of the study suggest that irrespective of students’ seniority in the postgraduate programme, responses of students with previous project work experience more closely match the responses of project professionals, in contrast to students without such experience. The results indicate that students’ previous project work experience does play a role in their understanding and learning. In addition, the paper also identifies four factor groupings of CSFs and, diverging from past studies, conceptualises “alignment” as a new factor grouping.

Practical implications

Findings support the view that adequate previous work experience may be included as an essential qualifying requirement for pursuing higher education in project management.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is one of the first empirical studies that investigate the requirement of students’ previous work experience and reveals its significance in higher project management education.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Book part

Chun Kit Lok

Smart card-based E-payment systems are receiving increasing attention as the number of implementations is witnessed on the rise globally. Understanding of user adoption…

Abstract

Smart card-based E-payment systems are receiving increasing attention as the number of implementations is witnessed on the rise globally. Understanding of user adoption behavior of E-payment systems that employ smart card technology becomes a research area that is of particular value and interest to both IS researchers and professionals. However, research interest focuses mostly on why a smart card-based E-payment system results in a failure or how the system could have grown into a success. This signals the fact that researchers have not had much opportunity to critically review a smart card-based E-payment system that has gained wide support and overcome the hurdle of critical mass adoption. The Octopus in Hong Kong has provided a rare opportunity for investigating smart card-based E-payment system because of its unprecedented success. This research seeks to thoroughly analyze the Octopus from technology adoption behavior perspectives.

Cultural impacts on adoption behavior are one of the key areas that this research posits to investigate. Since the present research is conducted in Hong Kong where a majority of population is Chinese ethnicity and yet is westernized in a number of aspects, assuming that users in Hong Kong are characterized by eastern or western culture is less useful. Explicit cultural characteristics at individual level are tapped into here instead of applying generalization of cultural beliefs to users to more accurately reflect cultural bias. In this vein, the technology acceptance model (TAM) is adapted, extended, and tested for its applicability cross-culturally in Hong Kong on the Octopus. Four cultural dimensions developed by Hofstede are included in this study, namely uncertainty avoidance, masculinity, individualism, and Confucian Dynamism (long-term orientation), to explore their influence on usage behavior through the mediation of perceived usefulness.

TAM is also integrated with the innovation diffusion theory (IDT) to borrow two constructs in relation to innovative characteristics, namely relative advantage and compatibility, in order to enhance the explanatory power of the proposed research model. Besides, the normative accountability of the research model is strengthened by embracing two social influences, namely subjective norm and image. As the last antecedent to perceived usefulness, prior experience serves to bring in the time variation factor to allow level of prior experience to exert both direct and moderating effects on perceived usefulness.

The resulting research model is analyzed by partial least squares (PLS)-based Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) approach. The research findings reveal that all cultural dimensions demonstrate direct effect on perceived usefulness though the influence of uncertainty avoidance is found marginally significant. Other constructs on innovative characteristics and social influences are validated to be significant as hypothesized. Prior experience does indeed significantly moderate the two influences that perceived usefulness receives from relative advantage and compatibility, respectively. The research model has demonstrated convincing explanatory power and so may be employed for further studies in other contexts. In particular, cultural effects play a key role in contributing to the uniqueness of the model, enabling it to be an effective tool to help critically understand increasingly internationalized IS system development and implementation efforts. This research also suggests several practical implications in view of the findings that could better inform managerial decisions for designing, implementing, or promoting smart card-based E-payment system.

Details

E-services Adoption: Processes by Firms in Developing Nations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-709-7

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Article

Daniel Roque Gomes and José Gonçalves Neves

The paper aims to clarify some incongruence between theoretical established grounds, that assume that an applicants' assessment of organizations is constrained by…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to clarify some incongruence between theoretical established grounds, that assume that an applicants' assessment of organizations is constrained by individual contextual factors, and dubious empirical findings. It seeks to propose that previous work experience (PWE) and previous response to job advertisements experience (PRA) interact with the vacancy elements of job and organizational attributes (OA) for the prediction of organizational attractiveness.

Design/methodology/approach

An adapted employment advertisement describing a job and an organization was presented to 227 participants from the marketing area (72 professionals and 155 marketing undergraduates), who were asked to respond to a questionnaire containing the measures of the study variables. The hypotheses were tested using linear regression methodology.

Findings

Empirical evidence showed that the assessment of the vacancy is constrained by individual contextual factors. PWE and PRA moderated the relation between the OA and attractiveness. PRA moderated the relation between perceived knowledge of results (KR) of the job and attractiveness.

Practical implications

The results imply different job searching profiles according to the type of applicants' prior experiences. A more experienced profile of applicants appears to have a job‐searching strategy based on the KR of the job itself and on the type of OA. A more junior profile appears to have a job‐searching strategy focused on the organization, and less related with the job itself.

Originality/value

Theoretically, the paper discusses the influences of individual context factors in organizational attraction. Empirically, it provides evidence of the role of applicants' previous experiences when assessing organizations. In practical terms, it discusses directions towards employee attraction activities. 

Details

Management Research: Journal of the Iberoamerican Academy of Management, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1536-5433

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